A rare and unusual species of shark called the Megamouth Shark (Megachasma pelagios), a deepwater filter-feeding shark, was beached early Wednesday morning at Barangay Marigondon, Pioduran, Albay.

The shark is the 66th recorded specimen in the world, 15th in the Philippines and the 2nd in Bicol Region. It is a male shark that measures up to 4.6 meters in length and weighs approximately 1 ton.

Currently, the shark is now kept frozen in a storage room at an ice plant in Daraga, Albay awaiting necropsy procedures to be performed by the veterinarians from the Provincial Veterinary Services.

The Authorities plan to preserve the shark through Taxidermy and place it at Albay Parks and Wildlife in Legaspi City.

Source: BFAR Bikol Facebook

(This is Part 2 of a 4-part photo set)

A rare and unusual species of shark called the Megamouth Shark (Megachasma pelagios), a deepwater filter-feeding shark, was beached early Wednesday morning at Barangay Marigondon, Pioduran, Albay.

The shark is the 66th recorded specimen in the world, 15th in the Philippines and the 2nd in Bicol Region. It is a male shark that measures up to 4.6 meters in length and weighs approximately 1 ton.

Currently, the shark is now kept frozen in a storage room at an ice plant in Daraga, Albay awaiting necropsy procedures to be performed by the veterinarians from the Provincial Veterinary Services.

The Authorities plan to preserve the shark through Taxidermy and place it at Albay Parks and Wildlife in Legaspi City.

Source: BFAR Bikol Facebook

(This is Part 1 of a 4-part photo set)

Today’s bird casualty consists of a female Daurian Starling (Agropsar sturninus) that broke her neck after flying headlong into a 2nd floor window.

Daurian Starlings are very common winter migrants to Singapore and can often be seen moving around in large flocks between the months of October to March.

Source: David Tan Instagram

Photo by Martin Alayban

A total of 26 dolphins stranded in 13 different barangay/towns in La Union and Pangasinan on January 26 and 27. 13 were immediately released, 12 died, and 1 is currently being rehabilitated by PMMSN headed by BFAR 1.

Source: Friends of PMMSN – Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network Facebook

This carcass of an adult male was found along Kranji Dam last Sunday (25 Jan) thanks to a member of the public. His cause of death is still unknown and we await an autopsy to find out.

It is sad, but in his death, we obtain valuable information such as physical measurements, DNA and gut contents for diet analysis among many other things.

If you have seen any animal carcasses, please contact the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum at +65 6516 5082, or contact this page with information on the species, exact location and condition of animal.

Thanks to Ivan Kwan and his colleagues for the retrieval and delivery of the carcass!

(Photos by Foo Maosheng)

Source: OtterWatch

Yesterday afternoon I received word about a White-bellied Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) carcass outside the 28th floor window of Centennial Towers at Millenia Walk.

Unfortunately, due to the inconvenient location of the bird, we had to wait till today for the building management to kindly retrieve the carcass by gondola. This meant that the Eagle was emitting a right proper pong by the time I brought it back to the lab, not helped by the fact that fish-eating birds are also naturally smelly.

Based on what I could tell, the bird had a thoroughly broken neck, which suggests that it may have died after flying into the glass window. Now this is very unusual since White-bellied Sea Eagles are very well-adapted to urban living and shouldn’t have any problems with glass windows at all. The building manager did mention, however, that another Sea Eagle was found at the same time on the roof of the building, injured and unable to fly. It might be that the two birds could have been fighting and one of them, disoriented and dazed, could’ve lost its bearings and flown directly into the window and died. The other bird is now reportedly at the zoo being treated for its injuries.

Photos courtesy of Anuj Jain. Thanks to Wong Ley Kun for informing me about the bird.

Source: David Tan Facebook