Daily Decay (31st July 2015): Unidentified Snapper (Lutjanus sp.) @ Pulau Sekudu

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Malaysia: Orangutan dies from injuries
28th July 2015;

The 20-year-old male Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) that was attacked by an Indonesian oil palm plantation worker died nearly two weeks after undergoing intensive medical treatment at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic facility in Sandakan on Sunday.

Veterinarians and other medical experts did everything they could to save the Orangutan named by wildlife officials as Gedau after Ladang Gedau, Beluran, about 65km from Sandakan, where it was found lying near an oil palm tree by plantation workers on July 13.

“(But) I regret to say that we have lost the poor injured Orangutan due to severe complication, initially caused by the savage attack by the plantation worker,” said a sad State Wildlife Director, William Baya.

Gedau was found with a long slash wound on his back caused by a parang (machete) as well as several smaller wounds on his head.

Baya said Gedau seemed to be improving after receiving medical treatment for the first few days and was reported to have been able to eat a banana.

Unfortunately, he said when Gedau was further observed and monitored it became obvious that the parang wound to the back was so deep that it had punctured the air sac, causing a severe infection.

The air sac is a loose pouch located around the throat of the Orangutan for vocalising.

“Even with all our expert care and medical treatment the results of the post mortem confirmed that the Orangutan died of an acute and severe septicaemia caused by the initial parang wound and also the smaller secondary wounds that were probably caused by the same parang,” said Baya.

With the death of the Orangutan, he said the case has now escalated to “a killing (murder) of a fully protected species.”

“I have directed my Prosecution Officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment to be meted out to the Orangutan killer,” said Baya.

Last Friday, an Indonesian, Syam bin Sul, aged 38, was sentenced to 12 months behind bars by the Sandakan Magistrate’s Court after admitting to wounding the Orangutan with a machete because he claimed the Orangutan tried to chase him while he was on his way back to his kongsi from work.

The charge was framed under Section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997, which provides for a penalty of a fine of RM20,000 or imprisonment for two years or both for causing reckless injury to protected animals.

The maximum penalty for killing a fully protected species under Schedule One of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment is five years’ jail or a RM50,000 fine or both upon conviction.

Source: Daily Express

Rescuers attending to Gedau after it was found severely wounded at a plantation in Beluran.

Malaysia: Abused Orangutan dies, Wildlife department wants tougher penalties
By Awang Ali Omar, 28th July 2015;

The State Wildlife department will consider appealing to the court to impose a stiffer penalty against a plantation worker who was jailed for injuring an Orangutan.

The male Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) affectionately called Gedau by his rescuers died at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic here on Sunday, about two weeks after it was found with several slash and stab wounds at an oil palm plantation in Beluran on July 13.

State Wildlife director William Baya said the department is now mulling a stiffer penalty against the culprit, Syam Sul, a 38-year-old Indonesian.

Syam was sentenced to 12 months jail by the Magistrate Court here for the offence of hurting a protected animal under section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997 which provides a penalty of a fine of RM20,000 or imprisonment for two years or both.

“Now since this case has escalated to a killing of a fully protected species and not just injuring it, I have directed my Prosecution Officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment to be meted out to the Orangutan killer,” he stressed.

Source: New Straits Times

Philippines: Fishkill traced to rain, flood, sewage

By Tonette Orejas, 28th July 2015;

Rain, floodwater and sewage draining into the Pampanga River caused oxygen in water to drop to extremely low levels, killing thousands of fish downstream in Candaba, Masantol and Macabebe towns last week, according to a report of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR).

A water quality assessment conducted by BFAR revealed that dissolved oxygen (DO) in portions of the river fell between 1.28 milligram per liter and 1.41 mg/l, said Gonzalo Coloma Jr., the bureau’s fish health officer in Central Luzon.

The ideal level so fish can process oxygen and breathe is 5 mg/l.

High nutrient content

“The extremely low DO level obtained from Pampanga River may be due to the high nutrient content of water coming from the Upper Pampanga River, which originates from Nueva Ecija, Tarlac and Bulacan,” Coloma said in the report.

“This was evident by the presence of gray to brownish color of the water during the time of the sampling,” he added.

“This, together with the decaying organic materials like garbage and dead plants (particularly water lilies) at the bottom of the river, aggravated the condition of the water.”

Other possible contributors to the low dissolved oxygen level were sewage discharges from houses, commercial establishments, and poultry and swine farms along the tributaries of the Pampanga River, the report said.

Dead fish floating

Former Masantol Vice Mayor Marcelo Lacap Jr., who alerted the BFAR on the incident, said fishermen reported seeing dead fish floating as early as 5 a.m. on Thursday.

This was the first massive fishkill incident here since the 1990s when thousands of fish went belly-up due to wastes discharged into the river.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

Philippines: Fishkill traced to rain, flood, sewage