Malaysia: Orangutan dies from injuries
28th July 2015;

The 20-year-old male Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) that was attacked by an Indonesian oil palm plantation worker died nearly two weeks after undergoing intensive medical treatment at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic facility in Sandakan on Sunday.

Veterinarians and other medical experts did everything they could to save the Orangutan named by wildlife officials as Gedau after Ladang Gedau, Beluran, about 65km from Sandakan, where it was found lying near an oil palm tree by plantation workers on July 13.

“(But) I regret to say that we have lost the poor injured Orangutan due to severe complication, initially caused by the savage attack by the plantation worker,” said a sad State Wildlife Director, William Baya.

Gedau was found with a long slash wound on his back caused by a parang (machete) as well as several smaller wounds on his head.

Baya said Gedau seemed to be improving after receiving medical treatment for the first few days and was reported to have been able to eat a banana.

Unfortunately, he said when Gedau was further observed and monitored it became obvious that the parang wound to the back was so deep that it had punctured the air sac, causing a severe infection.

The air sac is a loose pouch located around the throat of the Orangutan for vocalising.

“Even with all our expert care and medical treatment the results of the post mortem confirmed that the Orangutan died of an acute and severe septicaemia caused by the initial parang wound and also the smaller secondary wounds that were probably caused by the same parang,” said Baya.

With the death of the Orangutan, he said the case has now escalated to “a killing (murder) of a fully protected species.”

“I have directed my Prosecution Officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment to be meted out to the Orangutan killer,” said Baya.

Last Friday, an Indonesian, Syam bin Sul, aged 38, was sentenced to 12 months behind bars by the Sandakan Magistrate’s Court after admitting to wounding the Orangutan with a machete because he claimed the Orangutan tried to chase him while he was on his way back to his kongsi from work.

The charge was framed under Section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997, which provides for a penalty of a fine of RM20,000 or imprisonment for two years or both for causing reckless injury to protected animals.

The maximum penalty for killing a fully protected species under Schedule One of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment is five years’ jail or a RM50,000 fine or both upon conviction.

Source: Daily Express

Rescuers attending to Gedau after it was found severely wounded at a plantation in Beluran.

Malaysia: Abused Orangutan dies, Wildlife department wants tougher penalties
By Awang Ali Omar, 28th July 2015;

The State Wildlife department will consider appealing to the court to impose a stiffer penalty against a plantation worker who was jailed for injuring an Orangutan.

The male Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) affectionately called Gedau by his rescuers died at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic here on Sunday, about two weeks after it was found with several slash and stab wounds at an oil palm plantation in Beluran on July 13.

State Wildlife director William Baya said the department is now mulling a stiffer penalty against the culprit, Syam Sul, a 38-year-old Indonesian.

Syam was sentenced to 12 months jail by the Magistrate Court here for the offence of hurting a protected animal under section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997 which provides a penalty of a fine of RM20,000 or imprisonment for two years or both.

“Now since this case has escalated to a killing of a fully protected species and not just injuring it, I have directed my Prosecution Officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment to be meted out to the Orangutan killer,” he stressed.

Source: New Straits Times

Philippines: Fishkill traced to rain, flood, sewage

By Tonette Orejas, 28th July 2015;

Rain, floodwater and sewage draining into the Pampanga River caused oxygen in water to drop to extremely low levels, killing thousands of fish downstream in Candaba, Masantol and Macabebe towns last week, according to a report of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR).

A water quality assessment conducted by BFAR revealed that dissolved oxygen (DO) in portions of the river fell between 1.28 milligram per liter and 1.41 mg/l, said Gonzalo Coloma Jr., the bureau’s fish health officer in Central Luzon.

The ideal level so fish can process oxygen and breathe is 5 mg/l.

High nutrient content

“The extremely low DO level obtained from Pampanga River may be due to the high nutrient content of water coming from the Upper Pampanga River, which originates from Nueva Ecija, Tarlac and Bulacan,” Coloma said in the report.

“This was evident by the presence of gray to brownish color of the water during the time of the sampling,” he added.

“This, together with the decaying organic materials like garbage and dead plants (particularly water lilies) at the bottom of the river, aggravated the condition of the water.”

Other possible contributors to the low dissolved oxygen level were sewage discharges from houses, commercial establishments, and poultry and swine farms along the tributaries of the Pampanga River, the report said.

Dead fish floating

Former Masantol Vice Mayor Marcelo Lacap Jr., who alerted the BFAR on the incident, said fishermen reported seeing dead fish floating as early as 5 a.m. on Thursday.

This was the first massive fishkill incident here since the 1990s when thousands of fish went belly-up due to wastes discharged into the river.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

Philippines: Fishkill traced to rain, flood, sewage

Gedau when he was found at the oil palm estate.

Malaysia: Gedau, the rescued Orangutan, dies of injuries
By Stephanie Lee, 27th July 2015;

After two weeks fighting for his life, 20-year-old male Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Gedau has succumbed to his injuries.

Gedau, who was found on July 13 in an oil palm estate in Gedau, Beluran, died at 4.30pm on Sunday due possibly to blood poisoning from the infections to his wounds on his body.

Sabah Wildlife Department director William Baya said in a statement that Gedau died due to severe complications initially caused by the savage attack by an Indonesian plantation worker.

“Our veterinary and medical team at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic facility tried their best to save it, and for the first few days the Orangutan seemed to be improving,” he said.

“Unfortunately when the Orangutan was further observed and monitored it became obvious that the parang wound to the back was so deep that it punctured into the air sac (a loose pouch located around the throat used for vocalising), causing severe infection,” William said.

“Even with all our expert care and medical treatment the results of the post mortem confirmed that the Orangutan died of acute and severe septicaemia (commonly known as blood poisoning) caused by the initial parang wound and also the smaller secondary wounds that was probably caused by the same weapon,” he added.

Gedau was discovered by plantation workers at the estate not far from east coast Sandakan district and was handed over to wildlife officials the next day after the workers noticed wounds on its body.

Syam Sul, 38, claimed that he attacked the Orangutan after it chased him and has been jailed for a year.

William said they would be appealing for a heavier sentence to be imposed on Syam Sul now that Gedau has died.

“Since this case has escalated to a killing of a fully protected species and not just injuring it, I have directed my prosecution officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment for the Orangutan killer,” he said.

Source: The Star

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE FROM THE SABAH WILDIFE DEPARTMENT

SEVERELY INJURED ORANGUTAN DIES AFTER 13 DAYS OF FIGHTING FOR HIS LIFE

The severely injured male adult Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) that was brutally attacked by a worker from an oil palm estate located 65 kilometers from Sandakan has sadly succumbed to its injuries yesterday at 4.30pm at Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic facility.

The Director of Sabah Wildlife Department, Mr. William Baya said “I sincerely regret to say that we have lost the poor injured Orangutan due to severe complication, initially caused by the savage attack by the plantation worker. Our veterinary and medical team tried their utmost best to save it, and even for the first few days the Orangutan seemed to be improving for the better. Unfortunately when the Orangutan was further observed and monitored it became obvious that the parang wound to the back was so deep that it had punctured into the air sac, causing a severe infection. The air sac is a loose pouch located around the throat of the Orangutan that he uses for vocalizing. Even with all our expert care and medical treatment the results of the post mortem confirmed that the Orangutan died of an acute and severe septicemia caused by the initial parang wound and also the smaller secondary wounds that was probably caused by the same parang,” added William.

An Indonesian estate worker Syam bin Sul aged 38 was sentenced to 12 months jail by Sandakan Magistrate Court for the above offence. He was charged under section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997 which provides a penalty of a fine of 20,000 ringgit or imprisonment for two years or both for causing reckless injury to protected animal. “Now since this case has escalated to a killing (murder) of a fully protected species and not just injuring it, I have directed my Prosecution Officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment to be meted out to the Orangutan killer,” concluded William Baya.

Source: Sen Nathan Facebook

Philippines: Mayor: Waste, water lilies caused Masantol fishkill

By Leslie Anne Mahusay and Chris Navarro, 27th July 2015;

The lack of oxygen at the Pampanga River due to waste and water lilies are the possible causes of the fishkill in the municipality recently, Masantol Mayor Dan Guintu said on Monday.

“The test results on the water sample from Pampanga River last Friday showed that various types of fish lacked oxygen because of wastes and water lilies, not because of harmful chemicals dumped from factories,” Guintu said.

He said the recent rains in the country caused the waste and water lilies from different neighboring towns to gather in low areas of Masantol town.

Yung mga basura na dahil sa baha halos sa amin lahat napupunta,” Guintu added.

He said that some towns in the province like San Luis, Apalit and Macabebe also experienced the fishkill but Masantol was seriously hit as it is surrounded by Pampanga River and Manila Bay.

The mayor pointed out that almost 10 barangays in Masantol were affected by the fishkill.

“We are now looking into help we can give to fishermen and their families because we ordered them not to fish at the Pampanga River for three days to avoid other incidents,” Guintu noted.

Guintu said that Governor Lilia Pineda also told the mayor that if there are other forms of assistance the provincial Capitol can give.

“Our governor told us to report on the total computation of the damages caused by the fishkill,” he said.

Meanwhile, Bajun Lacap, Pampanga coastal emergency response officer, said that Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), Burasi (Common Carp) (Cyprinus carpio), Imelda (Bighead Carp) (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and Gloria (Black-chinned Tilapia) (Sarotherodon melanotheron) are some of the types of fish affected by the fishkill.

Source:

Philippines: Mayor: Waste, water lilies caused Masantol fishkill