Photos: Liputan6, Okezone, Kompas

Indonesia: Giant man-sized Amazonian fish washes up on Ciliwung River in Bogor
30th November 2015;

Yesterday, citizens in Bogor were shocked to find an enormous dead fish, as large as a full-grown man, washed up on the banks of the Ciliwung River under the Jalan Baru Bridge in North Bogor.

The fish was identified as an Arapaima (Araipama gigas), native to the Amazon rainforests.

No, the fish didn’t swim half the world to end up in the Ciliwung. It was later revealed that the fish lived in an aquarium in Sumber Karya Indah (SKI) tourism attraction in Tajur, Bogor, and had only recently died.

“Yesterday (Saturday), a fish died at around 7:30AM,” said SKI informations officer M Sholeh, as quoted by Kompas on Sunday.

Sholeh added that they haven’t determined the fish’s cause of death.

Because of the lack of burial rites for fish – however magnificent they may be – the dead Araipama was simply tossed into the river, presumably to become fish food.

Fate would have it that the dead fish resurfaced in Bogor for a final send off. It was reported that it took seven adult males to lift the fish and toss it back into the river.

We certainly hope it doesn’t wash up anywhere else downstream so it can rest peacefully in its watery grave.

Source: Coconuts Jakarta

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Photo: Detik

Indonesia: “Millions” of dead fish wash up ashore in Ancol, stinking up the area
30th November 2015;

It’s been a bad few days for fish in Jakarta.

Scores of small dead fish washed up along the Ancol coastline in North Jakarta this morning.

“The dead fish are found along Ancol beach, from Jimbaran all the way to the other end. Maybe there are millions [of dead fish],” said Police Commissioner Edi Guritno, head of the Law Enforcement Sub-Directorate at the Jakarta Maritime Police, as quoted by Detik today.

Residents are reporting horrid, foul smells coming from the area.

Authorities have not figured out what killed the fish. Samples of the fish were taken to a lab to investigate this extremely strange occurrence.

While the waters around North Jakarta’s coastline aren’t known for being the cleanest, this is a pretty alarming sign that there may be some seriously toxic contaminants in the water. Hopefully authorities will figure out the cause quickly before it affects the capital’s water or food supplies.

Source: Coconuts Jakarta

Thick-edged Sand Dollar (Jacksonaster depressum)
Coney Island (Pulau Serangoon), 27th November 2015

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead

28th November 2015;

Fish farmers in Kina­batangan ,the site of Malaysi’’s biggest Ramsar site, were stunned to find that all their fish, reared in cages, were dead.

“We noticed something amiss earlier. When dawn came the next day (last Friday), our worst fears were confirmed when we found all of them belly up,” said Kampung Mumiang Village Development and Security Committee head Mada Hussin.

The fish were reared in 50 cages.

Kampung Mumiang is located at the estuary of the Kinabatangan River and is about an hour away by speedboat from Sandakan.

The Convention on Wetlands of Inter­national Importance, better known as the Ramsar Convention, is an inter-governmental treaty that looks into conservation wetlands and their resources. There are six Ramsar sites in Malaysia.

Mada said the farmers lost Grouper (SubF. Epinephelinae), Snapper (F. Lutjanidae) and other types of fish, adding that the cost could come up to RM100,000.

This would impact about 50 families, he said.

“We want answers from the authorities. We want to know the cause. We want compensation from whoever is responsible for our losses,” Mada said.

The villagers, he said, would usually keep some fish for their own consumption and sell the rest.

“We have lost everything now,” he added.

He said the farmers were in a dilemma as they could not depend on catching fish at the nearby river due to dwindling numbers.

“The villagers are now waiting for test results on samples taken by the Fisheries Department.”

Mada said pollutants from a plantation could have flowed into the Malangking River, a tributary of the Kinabatangan.

“The last time we lost fish on this scale was about four years ago,” he said.

Cynthia Ong, the director of Forever Sabah which works towards an equitable and green economy, said such tragic events were typically associated with oxygen depletion in dead zones caused by fertiliser, palm oil mill effluents or disturbed peat soil.

“Studies in Malaysia and around the world showed that fisheries sustained by healthy mangroves are worth hundreds of dollars per hectare to the Sabah economy,” Ong said.

Source: The Star

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead

28th November 2015;

Fish farmers in Kinabatangan, the site of Malaysia’s biggest Ramsar site, were stunned to find that all their fish, reared in cages, were dead.

“We noticed something amiss earlier. When dawn came the next day (last Friday), our worst fears were confirmed when we found all of them belly up,” said Kampung Mumiang Village Development and Security Committee head Mada Hussin.

The fish were reared in 50 cages.

Kampung Mumiang is located at the estuary of the Kinabatangan River and is about an hour away by speedboat from Sandakan.

The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, better known as the Ramsar Convention, is an inter-governmental treaty that looks into conservation wetlands and their resources. There are six Ramsar sites in Malaysia.

Mada said the farmers lost Grouper (SubF. Epinephelinae), Snapper (F. Lutjanidae) and other types of fish, adding that the cost could come up to RM100,000.

This would impact about 50 families, he said.

“We want answers from the authorities. We want to know the cause. We want compensation from whoever is responsible for our losses,” Mada said.

The villagers, he said, would usually keep some fish for their own consumption and sell the rest.

“We have lost everything now,” he added.

He said the farmers were in a dilemma as they could not depend on catching fish at the nearby river due to dwindling numbers.

“The villagers are now waiting for test results on samples taken by the Fisheries Department.”

Mada said pollutants from a plantation could have flowed into the Malangking River, a tributary of the Kinabatangan.

“The last time we lost fish on this scale was about four years ago,” he said.

Cynthia Ong, the director of Forever Sabah which works towards an equitable and green economy, said such tragic events were typically associated with oxygen depletion in dead zones caused by fertiliser, palm oil mill effluents or disturbed peat soil.

“Studies in Malaysia and around the world showed that fisheries sustained by healthy mangroves are worth hundreds of dollars per hectare to the Sabah economy,” Ong said.

Source: The Star

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead