SMUGGLED? At least 15 dead Pangolins are found in Bacolod City, Negros Occidental on March 18, 2017.
Photo: John Dale Salazar

Philippines: Dead Pangolins found in Negros Occidental
At least 15 frozen Pangolins with no internal organs are found at the roadside in Bacolod City
By Marchel P. Espina, 18th March 2017;

Residents of a reclaimed area in Bacolod City, Negros Occidental discovered a sack of dead Pangolins (Manis sp.) on Friday, March 17.

Pangolins, or Scaly Anteaters, are considered endangered species that are found in Palawan and other parts of the world.

They are said to be the most illegally traded animal in the world. The Independent reported that there are 8 species of Pangolin that are still in existence in India, China, Southeast Asia, and parts of Africa.

The residents, who are not familiar with the mammals that usually inhabit forests and woodlands, claimed that the 15 Pangolins were frozen and had no internal organs when they were found at the roadside.

Al Orolfo, director of Department of Environment and Natural Resources in Negros Island Region, said the tissue of the Pangolins will be forwarded to DENR’s Biodiversity Management Bureau for DNA testing to determine if they came from Palawan or Malaysia.

In January, the Philippine Coast Guard intercepted a truck onboard MV St. Francis Xavier of 2GO, that carried smuggled marine species at Pier 4, North Harbor in Manila.

At least 7 boxes containing 60 Pangolins, 13 sacks of Seahorses (Hippocampus sp.), and one box of Sea Dragons (Pipefish) (SubF. Syngnathinae) were recovered in the 10-wheeler truck from Bacolod City.

Authorities, however, suspected that the truck originally came from Palawan.

Meanwhile, in Cauayan town, which is more than 3 hours away from Bacolod City, a dead Sea Turtle was washed ashore in Sitio Mabua in Barangay Poblacion on Thursday, March 16.

The Sea Turtle was already in a state of decomposition when it was discovered by the residents. It also had big cuts on its head and flippers.

Source: Rappler

These are likely to be Philippine Pangolins (Manis culionensis) from Palawan, although they could also be Sunda Pangolin (Manis javanica), a species not native to the Philippines.

Photos: Bombo Radyo Bacolod Facebook

Philippines: Dead Pangolins found
18th March 2017;

Dead Pangolins (F. Manidae) were found on a roadside at the reclamation area in Bacolod City Friday, March 17.

Pangolins, also known as “Scaly Anteaters,” are burrowing mammals covered in tough, overlapping scales. They quickly roll themselves up into a tight ball to any potential predator.

They are victims of illegal wildlife crime mainly in Asia and in growing amounts in Africa and are considered one of the most endangered groups of mammals in the world.

Around 5 p.m. Friday, residents found the Pangolins with no internal organs wrapped in plastic bags and placed inside a sack.

Before the report reached the authorities, the Pangolins were frozen when found by a scrap-gatherer Thursday afternoon.

Due to fear, residents failed to report the incident immediately to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR).

Al Orolfo, regional director of DENR in Negros Island Region (NIR), said in a radio interview that he already directed his personnel to proceed to the area and check the report for investigation.

Source: Sun.Star

These are likely to be Philippine Pangolins (Manis culionensis) from Palawan, although they could also be Sunda Pangolin (Manis javanica), a species not native to the Philippines.

The dead Porpoise and other marine life washed ashore at Luak.

Malaysia: Dead Dolphin, fish and crustaceans washed ashore, cause unknown
18th March 2017;

A Dolphin Porpoise believed to be an adult male Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) locally known as Lumba-lumba was among dead marine creatures washed ashore since last Monday.

Oswald Braken Tisen from Sarawak Marine Mammal Stranding Network (SMMSN) said a staff of a club house – Beach Republic at Luak – found the carcass of the 1.39 metre Dolphin Porpoise at the beach between the club house and the nearby Luak Esplanade.

“Swift action was taken by the Department of Forestry, Miri and Sarawak Forestry Corporation, SFC Miri and other members of the Network upon knowing about the incidence this morning,” he said when contacted by the Borneo Post yesterday.

He said the carcass had been brought to SFC Miri for examination and was later buried at Piasau Nature Reserve.

Braken, who is also SFC’s deputy general manager said currently the cause of death of the Dolphin Porpoise, fish and crustaceans has not been ascertained.

“It is hard to determine and it could that the Dolphin Porpoise is injured or is old and sick. We are still investigating,” he said.

Asked why fish, cockles and crustaceans also died along that stretch of the sea, Braken said he had yet to receive further reports, adding that the case was the first one to occur here this year.

Last year, three dead Dolphins were washed ashore here.

Meanwhile, the staff of Beach Republic said that he had sensed something unusual when he detected a stench blown from the sea and many dead clams and cockles were washed ashore since Monday.

Source: The Borneo Post

The shells appear to be those of Button Snails (Umbonium vestiarium), while the Ray is likely to be a Long-nosed Eagle Ray (Aetobatus flagellum) and the fishes are a species of Puffer (Lagocephalus sp.).