Daily Decay (28th February 2018)

Daily Decay (28th February 2018): Eeltail Catfish (F. Plotosidae) @ Changi

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in February 2014, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor. Three species of Eeltail Catfish are present in Singapore waters – the Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus), Black Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus canius), and White-lipped Eeltail Catfish (Paraplotosus albilabris). Due to the decomposed state of this carcass, it’s not clear which species it is.

Daily Decay (27th February 2018)

Daily Decay (27th February 2018): Unidentified Blow Fly (F. Calliphoridae) @ Lorong Halus

Several squashed Blow Flies were seen around a Changeable Lizard (Calotes versicolor) roadkill. It’s likely that the flies had been attracted to the carcass, only to fall victim as well to another vehicle.

Mangrove Horseshoe Crab

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Moult of Mangrove Horseshoe Crab (Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda)
Coney Island (Pulau Serangoon), 31st May 2017

Daily Decay (25th February 2018)




Daily Decay (25th February 2018): Moult of Unidentified Cicada (F. Cicadidae) @ Sentosa

Daily Decay (24th February 2018)


Daily Decay (24th February 2018): Hard Coral (F. Merulinidae) @ Sentosa

A boulder with an encrusting hard coral still attached to it was found along a footpath. This is likely to be a species of Coelastrea, Platygyra, or Favites.

Daily Decay (23rd February 2018)

 
Daily Decay (23rd February 2018): Giant Honeybees (Apis dorsata) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

There was a large colony located next to a trail, and due to safety reasons, the hive had to be removed. Pest control was called in, and these were among the many casualties.
 

Source: Hilbert Montell Facebook

Some of the dead fishes seen in Sungai Oya in Sarawak, presumably casualties of a recent mass mortality event. Two of the fishes in these photos are identifiable as Fire Eel (Mastacembelus erythrotaenia), while the other two are of unidentifiable Catfishes (Siluriformes).

 

Daily Decay (22nd February 2018)

Daily Decay (22nd February 2018): Spotted Scat (Scatophagus argus) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in late February and March 2015, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor.

Malaysia: No reason found yet on why lobsters, fish in Oya River died


Source: Berita Harian

22nd February 2018;

The mass surfacing and and subsequent dying of aquatic life, particularly lobsters prawns and fish, in Oya River, Dalat that went viral on social media could have been caused by many factors, including poisoning.

Nanoplankton specialist Musa Musbah said 20 to 30 years ago, such phenomenon occurred not only in Dalat river but also in other rivers in Sarawak including in Niah and Sibuti areas in Miri, with varying degrees.

He was asked to comment on the so-called ‘drunken phenomenon’ of aquatic life in Oya River, which drew many comments on his Facebook page.

Musa reminded those who doubted the safety of such prawns or fish sold in the market to temporarily avoid eating them until the authorities come up with their findings and give assurance that whatever is caught from the river is safe to consume.

He did not deny that there might be some individuals who used poison to catch fish and prawns due to ignorance on its impact on health, while there might be others who did it for quick profit.

Meanwhile, Natural Resources and Environment Minister Dato Sri Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar was reported in the local media as saying that the Department of Environment (DoE) would investigate and study the causes of the phenomenon.

Source: The Borneo Post

Those are not lobsters, but Giant River Prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), while the fish in the photo appears to be a Helicopter Catfish (Wallagonia leerii).

 

Daily Decay (21st February 2018)

Daily Decay (21st February 2018): Red Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Red Tilapia are hybrids, typically between Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), although other species have also been involved. They are commonly raised in fish farms for human consumption, and escapees are regularly seen in some parts of Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve.