Indochinese Glass-perchlet

 

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Indochinese Glass-perchlet (Parambassis siamensis)
Kranji Marshes, 29th June 2017

Mass Marine Mortality at Pasir Ris
By Sean Yap, 28th February 2015;

For the past few years around this time of the year there have been occurrences of mass fish deaths on our northern shores. This year is no exception. Ria was here earlier as well, and has done a comprehensive blog post about the situation. I’m just posting photos of cool dead things. I know I don’t sound sad but I am, kay 😦

So Chinse New Year is over, and the food guilt finally set in so I decided to try and run to work some of the sin off. As soon as I hit the path however, my nose was immediately assaulted by a foul stench. I had seen some of my friends posting about fish deaths on Facebook, so I decided to go see for myself what the situation was like (totally not an excuse).

The first stop was a breakwater, and LO AND BEHOLD, I was greeted with a friggin mass grave.

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Source: Nature in a Concrete Jungle

Thousands of dead fishes at Pasir Ris
By Ria Tan, 28th February 2015;

Thousand of dead fishes washed up at Pasir Ris beach today. Sean Yap also shared photos of dead fishes found on the same stretch of western Pasir Ris that I surveyed.

What is causing this mass fish death? Is it harmful to humans?

There was a line of dead fishes along the area I surveyed. Some had a thinner line.

In the part of the shore outside Pasir Ris Park proper, there was a bigger build up of dead fishes. But even here, the cleaners were trying hard to clear up the fishes. I also met Dixon who was cycling in the area and went down to the shore. I asked for his help to go down the entire length of Pasir Ris Park to see how widespread the dead fishes are. Thank you Dixon!

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Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

Casualties include eels, pufferfish and frogfish (which I’m seeing for the first time – sad it has to be this way). Cephalopods were not spared either.

Source: Sean Yap Instagram

Some tentative identifications:
Left: Estuarine Moray Eel (Gymnothorax tile), with Striped Eeltail Catfishes (Plotosus lineatus), Kops’ Glass Perchlets (Ambassis kopsii) and Telkara Glass Perchlets (Ambassis vachellii), and possibly a Threespot Damselfish (Pomacentrus tripunctatus).
Right (Top): Cuttlefish (Sepia sp.) with Telkara Glass Perchlets.
Right (Centre): Spotted-tail Frogfish (Lophiocharon trisignatus).
Right (Bottom): Spotted Green Puffer (Tetraodon nigroviridis).

Dead fish update: Pasir Ris, Seletar Dam, Sembawang
By Ria Tan, 27th February 2015;

Today I had a quick look at the western shores of Pasir Ris. There were a few large dead fishes and many smaller ones. All appeared to be wild fishes. Also, dead cuttlefishes and horseshoe crabs. I didn’t see any dead farm fishes. Sightings of dead fishes at Seletar Dam (Benjamin Li) and Sembawang (Tan Sijie) were also shared recently.

Timothy Hromatka, a fish farmer off Ubin also shared more about the recent fish deaths on the farms.

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Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

Tentative identifications:

  1. Telkara Glass Perchlet (Ambassis vachellii), Peanut Worm (Sipuncula)
  2. Mangrove Whipray (Himantura walga), Grouper (Epinephelus sp.)
  3. Grouper
  4. Mangrove Whipray
  5. Mangrove Whipray
  6. Green Chromide (Etroplus suratensis)
  7. Green Chromide
  8. Sole (F. Soleidae)
  9. Spotted Scat (Scatophagus argus)
  10. Green Chromide

Reporting from Seletar Dam facing Johor side. Unusually strong pungent smell from the sea got my curiosity as I was riding past this stretch.

Along the shores was a zone of 2 metres with dead horseshoe crabs (F. Limulidae), Mangrove Whiprays (Himantura walga), Flower Crab (Portunus pelagicus), Grouper (Epinephelus sp.), Sand Whiting (Sillago sp.), Green Chromide (Etroplus suratensis), Spotted Scat (Scatophagus argus), Barramundi (Lates calcarifer), Toadfish (F. Batrachoididae), shrimps and huge colonies of marine bristleworms (Polychaeta).

Source: Benjamin Li Facebook

(This is Part 2 of a 3-part photo set)

Fishes dying at Pasir Ris?
By Ria Tan, 22nd February 2015;

I heard the water was not quite right at Pasir Ris. So I had a quick look there yesterday.

I saw white powdery insoluble stuff deposited at most recent mid-tide line. Dead fishes of various kinds large and small every 20 steps or so. More below about why it is important for human health, to find out what is killing the fishes.

I saw dead fishes of various kinds large and small, wild and farmed, every 20 steps or so. Thanks to IDs provided by friends on my early Facebook post, here’s some tentative IDs.

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Source: Wild Shores of Singapore