Dead fish were found in a portion of Binalbagan River in Barangay Quintin Remo in Moises Padilla town.
Photo: Jed Jabonete Gumban

Philippines: Fish kill hits river in southern Negros
By Erwin P. Nicavera, 25th May 2016;

Two barangays in Isabela town, situated along Binalbagan River in southern Negros Occidental, reported a fish kill possibly caused by sulfur contamination following heavy rains that washed out ash fall emitted by Mt. Kanlaon.

Arturo Calma, municipal agriculture officer of Isabela, told Sun.Star Bacolod on Tuesday, May 24, that fish kill incidents were recorded in Barangays Tinongan and Panaquiao starting Monday afternoon, May 23.

Calma said that sacks of dead fishes, particularly Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), Mudfish (Common Snakehead) (Channa striata), and Eel (F. Anguillidae and F. Synbranchidae), were found floating on the river, some covered with mud.

“We have learned that some residents are even collecting dead fish for consumption,” Calma said, adding that monitoring and assessment is being conducted by the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office and the Municipal Agriculture Office.

The Office of the Provincial Agriculturist (OPA) through its Fisheries Division took water and mud samples from the two affected barangays on Tuesday.

Aquaculture technician Constancio Española Jr. said they will subject the samples to laboratory analysis to determine the actual cause of the fish die-off.

Aside from Isabela, fish kill incidents were also reported in some areas of Binalbagan, La Castellana, and Moises Padilla located along the Binalbagan River.

But Española said there is no confirmation yet from Binalbagan and Isabela.

“The last positive fish kill incident in La Castellana was last April this year, but for now, there is no confirmed reports from the area,” he said.

The Provincial Disaster Management Program Division (PDMPD) is also validating reports on fish kill, said its head Zephard Gerhart Caelian.

Caelian said heavy rains over the weekend washed out the ashfall from Mt. Kanlaon toward nearby bodies of water, including Binalbagan River.

“The high contamination of sulfur in the river might have resulted from the pyroclastic material flow brought by the recent ash fall emission of the volcano,” Caelian said, adding that according to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), “it is a normal occurrence.”

Last May 11, a sulfurous odor that lasted for almost 10 hours was smelled in portions of La Carlota City and La Castellana town, particularly those living near Mt. Kanlaon.

For areas with confirmed fish kill incidents, PDMPD warned residents to avoid consuming dead fish, or even swimming in the affected-portions of the river.

“Exposure and intake of contaminated water pose health hazards, including poisoning and skin diseases,” Caelian said.

Source: Sun.Star

Thousands of dead fishes at Pasir Ris
By Ria Tan, 28th February 2015;

Thousand of dead fishes washed up at Pasir Ris beach today. Sean Yap also shared photos of dead fishes found on the same stretch of western Pasir Ris that I surveyed.

What is causing this mass fish death? Is it harmful to humans?

There was a line of dead fishes along the area I surveyed. Some had a thinner line.

In the part of the shore outside Pasir Ris Park proper, there was a bigger build up of dead fishes. But even here, the cleaners were trying hard to clear up the fishes. I also met Dixon who was cycling in the area and went down to the shore. I asked for his help to go down the entire length of Pasir Ris Park to see how widespread the dead fishes are. Thank you Dixon!

Read More

Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

Casualties include eels, pufferfish and frogfish (which I’m seeing for the first time – sad it has to be this way). Cephalopods were not spared either.

Source: Sean Yap Instagram

Some tentative identifications:
Left: Estuarine Moray Eel (Gymnothorax tile), with Striped Eeltail Catfishes (Plotosus lineatus), Kops’ Glass Perchlets (Ambassis kopsii) and Telkara Glass Perchlets (Ambassis vachellii), and possibly a Threespot Damselfish (Pomacentrus tripunctatus).
Right (Top): Cuttlefish (Sepia sp.) with Telkara Glass Perchlets.
Right (Centre): Spotted-tail Frogfish (Lophiocharon trisignatus).
Right (Bottom): Spotted Green Puffer (Tetraodon nigroviridis).

What is killing fishes at Pasir Ris?
By Ria Tan, 25th February 2015;

I headed out in the afternoon to see if dead fishes were washing up at Pasir Ris Park beach.

There was a huge dead barracuda, and a few other large dead fishes. I didn’t see many dead farm fishes. Dead wild fishes were also reported over the last two days at Sembawang and Changi. The risks of fish deaths are rising in the weeks ahead as there will be no good spring tide to flush the waters around Pasir Ris and Pulau Ubin until April.

I checked out the western side of Pasir Ris today, the same stretch I checked three days ago on 22 Feb (Sat). Alas, today I came too late and the cleaner had already cleaned the high water tide line for the day. So I only checked the low water line of the most recent tide.

I also surveyed a stretch of beach wasn’t cleaned yet. So I could check the high water tide line for today. Here, I saw a few very crispy large dead fishes.

I also surveyed the western stretch of shoreline that is outside the Pasir Ris Park proper and thus is not cleaned at all. Here, I saw some really large dead fishes.

Read More

Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

Dead fishes found by divers near Koh Racha Yai.
Photos: Joe Blasy

Thailand: Phuket mystery: Autopsies yield no results for reef fish deaths
By Chutharat Plerin, 15th October 2014;

Autopsy results of dead fish collected at Koh Racha Yai off the southern coast of Phuket have yielded no clues as to why scores of reef fish are being found dead in the area (story here).

“We have yet to determine the cause of death. Experts conducted autopsies, but the results were inconclusive,” Phuket Marine Biological Center (PMBC) Director Ukkrit Satapoomin told the Phuket Gazette yesterday.

“Also, we checked the water conditions thinking that perhaps an influx of cold, less-oxygenated water transferred with more oxygenated water in the reef areas. However, that was not the case”

The other possibility is humans, Mr Ukkrit said.

“We have contacted people within our network and asked them to keep an eye out for any possible illegal fishing that might have caused the deaths. At this point, however, we do not want to make any unsubstantiated allegations,“ he explained.

“I have also contacted the Phuket Office of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) for additional ideas on what could be done to prevent the deaths from continuing.”

After the reports concerning the dead fish off Koh Racha Yai, reports of dozens of dead fish found along Nai Harn Beach surfaced.

“We cannot do this alone. People must not be afraid to contact us if they are able to document illegal fishing,” said Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) Region 5 Chief Tanet Munnoy.

“I am available 24-7, so call me on my mobile if you witness fishermen fishing in restricted areas or using illegal fishing practices. My number is 081 636-8099.”

Source: Phuket Gazette

Tentative identifications of the fish species pictured:

  1. Viper Moray Eel (Enchelynassa canina)
  2. Yellowfin Goatfish (Mulloidichthys vanicolensis)
  3. Checkered Snapper (Lutjanus decussatus)
  4. Streaked Rabbitfish (Siganus javus)
  5. Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus)
  6. Unknown
  7. Yellowfin Goatfish (Mulloidichthys vanicolensis)
  8. Streaked Rabbitfish (Siganus javus)
  9. Streaked Rabbitfish (Siganus javus)
  10. Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus)

Eel


Eel (Anguilliformes)
East Coast Park, 21st February 2010

This dessicated and sand-encrusted eel was found on the beach along East Coast Park. I presume that it was caught by an angler and then left to die on the shore. I personally have an axe to grind with people who do such things. Even if the fishes that are caught are unwanted, surely it’s not too difficult to empathise with them and release them back into the water? Why make a fish die so unnecessarily?

I didn’t look too closely to conclusively identify it, though I would think that it’s either a moray eel (F. Muraenidae) or snake eel (F. Ophichthidae).There are 2 species which I think are among the more likely candidates:

Estuarine Moray Eel (Gymnothorax tile)

Burrowing Snake Eel (Pisodonophis cancrivorus)