Weaver Ant

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Weaver Ant (Oecophylla smaragdina)
Lorong Halus, 31st May 2017

This particular individual Weaver Ant was a gyne or queen (female reproductive) – she would have left her colony as an alate (winged reproductive), flown for some distance, mated and shed her wings, and then searched for a site to establish her own colony. Unfortunately, it appears that something had stepped on her, or she had gotten run over by a passing vehicle.

 

 

Weaver Ant (Oecophylla smaragdina) being scavenged by Carpenter Ants (Camponotus auriventris) (?)
Chek Jawa, 14th March 2015

This particular individual Weaver Ant was a gyne or queen (female reproductive) – she would have left her colony as an alate (winged reproductive), flown for some distance, mated and shed her wings, and then searched for a site to establish her own colony. Unfortunately, it appears that something had stepped on her. The only colony she would ever sustain would be that of the Carpenter Ants scavenging on her remains.

Assorted insects found in Singapore, representing several major groups:

  • Butterflies & Moths (Lepidoptera)
  • Beetles (Coleoptera)
  • Bees, Wasps & Ants (Hymenoptera)
  • Flies (Diptera)
  • Dragonflies & Damselflies (Odonata)
  • Earwigs (Dermaptera)
  • Cockroaches & Termites (Blattodea)
  • Mantises (Mantodea)
  • Stick & Leaf Insects (Phasmatodea)
  • Grasshoppers, Crickets & Katydids (Orthoptera)
  • True Bugs (Hemiptera)

Insects are among the most diverse groups of animals, with more than a million species described (and counting), representing more than half of all known organisms! Despite their small size, the sheer number of insects and the countless niches they occupy mean that they actually play critical roles in various ecosystems. Butterflies and dragonflies are colourful and often highly visible, whereas many other groups are poorly studied in the tropics. Singapore is home to an extremely rich and diverse insect fauna that occupies all sorts of habitats, and we are still discovering new species of insects all the time.

These were some of the many specimens featured at the recently concluded Festival of Biodiversity 2014, which was held at VivoCity last weekend.