A Tapir found dead at Jalan Jeli- Dabong, near Kampung Renyuk, Kuala Krai. Up to 2,130 wild animals – most of them members of endangered species – were killed in traffic accidents over the past five years.
Photo: Perhilitan

Malaysia: Over 2,000 endangered animals killed on Malaysian roads since 2012
22nd November 2017;

Up to 2,130 wild animals – most of them members of endangered species – were killed in traffic accidents over the past five years, Deputy Natural Resources and Environment Minister Datuk Dr Hamim Samuri revealed on Tuesday.

He said that for the first nine months of this year, the Department of Wildlife and National Parks Peninsular Malaysia (Perhilitan) recorded the deaths of 212 wild animals.

“Most of the wildlife killed (belong to) endangered species, such as Tapirs (Tapirus indicus), Sun Bears (Helarctos malayanus), Elephants (Elephas maximus), Mountain Goats (Sumatran Serow) (Capricornis sumatraensis) and Tigers (Panthera tigris).

"I was told that Tapirs are (the number one) victims in roadkill incidents. Perhilitan records show that 43 Tapirs were killed in road accidents in the last five years.

"Most of the accidents occurred because the animals were trying to cross roads or highways to find shelter, food, mates and habitats,” Dr Hamim said in his opening speech at the Biodiversity Seminar 2017 here.

He advised motorists to be careful and pay attention while driving near forests, and especially at wildlife crossings.

Source: New Straits Times

Malaysia: Tapir found mutilated to death in Hulu Langat after footage of its capture raises suspicion
26th October 2017;

Social media was abuzz after the mutilated remains of a Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus) was found at Taman Desa Saujana, Batu 14 Hulu Langat yesterday at 1:30am – triggering speculations that the endangered species may have died in a rescue mission gone wrong.

An earlier footage of a Tapir being subdued with ropes while it was wildly thrashing around with a Bomba vehicle spotted in the background has stirred speculation over what had happened.

The incident, which went viral, caught the attention of Channel News Asia (CNA) correspondent, Sumisha Naidu, who took to social media to express her concern and woe over the heart breaking incident.

“This is appalling and heartbreaking. I do not know what happened yet but official investigations are ongoing. I will also say I KNOW there are many good people at Perhilitan – but whatever happened here is just…” she wrote in a Facebook posting yesterday (Oct 25).

“Please remember that most of the time these animals are more afraid of you than you are of them. Tapirs are herbivores, they have bad eyesight, they’re usually harmless unless they feel threatened.”

However, investigations conducted by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks (PERHILITAN) unearthed that the Tapir wandered into a nearby residential area after escaping from a forest reserve, which prompted civilians to contact the Fire and Rescue department.

“The Tapir’s death will affect the population of the wildlife, and therefore we take this matter seriously,” PERHILITAN Director Datuk Abdul Kadir Abu Hashim criticised the incident, and reminded that the public should not take arbitrary measures to save endangered animals, Harian Metro reports.

“However, the cause of death will be determined once the post-mortem report is out,” he said.

Additionally, Abdul Kadir relayed that the investigations are currently underway and underlined that the perpetrators will be convicted under Section 68, which carries a fine of up to RM100,000 or imprisoned for up to three years.

Source: Malaysian Digest

Preliminary investigations found that the carcass of the Tapir had some parts of its body such as ears, front leg, trunk and skin, mutilated.
Photos: Khairul Azri Facebook

Malaysia: Mutilated Tapir may have been strangled to death
26th October 2017;

The Department of Wildlife and National Parks (Perhilitan) has initiated an investigation into an adult male Tapir’s death that happened yesterday.

Its director-general Abdul Kadir Abu Hashim said preliminary investigations by the department found that the carcass of the Malayan Tapir ( (Tapirus indicus) located at Taman Desa Saujana, Batu 14, Hulu Langat had some parts of its body such as ears, front leg, trunk and skin mutilated.

Abdul Kadir said based on interviews with residents of Taman Desa Saujana and the security guard on duty that night revealed the Tapir had initially wandered into the neighbourhood and later fell into a drain.

“In an effort to rescue the Tapir, the residents had contacted the Malaysian Civil Defence Force (APM), Fire and Rescue Department and the police.

"The rescue operation carried out by the APM and Fire and Rescue Department ended at 1am but had left the Tapir dead and its carcass was abandoned at the scene. Residents were present during the rescue operation,” he said in a statement.

Perhilitan had also voiced its concern over the death of an adult Tapir, as it has an impact on wildlife population in its habitat.

“The Tapir’s cause of death will be determined through a post-mortem.

"However, the initial observation of the Department has hinted that possible cause of death was due to stress and inappropriate rescue methods.

"From pictures sent to us by residents, it can be seen that three length of ropes were used and tied around the Tapir’s neck to pull it up,” he said adding it could have been strangled to death.

Abdul Kadir reminded the public to not take matters into their own hands and contact the nearest Perhilitan branch to seek wildlife rescue assistance especially if they encounter any large mammal or endangered species.

Ill treatment of wildlife is punishable under Section 86 of the Wildlife Conservation Act 2010 (Act 716) and if convicted, the offender can be fined of up to RM50,000 or imprisoned up to one year or both.

“In addition, Tapirs are a fully protected species under Act 716 where taking and keeping a fully protected wildlife is an offense under Section 68 and those convicted can be fined up to RM100,000 or imprisoned up to three years or both,” he said.

Source: New Straits Times

  1. Roadkill of an adult female Tapir
  2. Roadkill of a female Tiger
  3. Roadkill of a baby Elephant

Photos: Perhilitan

Malaysia: Malaysia to roll out wildlife crossing awareness measures after spate of roadkill cases
By Sumisha Naidu, 21st October 2017;

Malaysia is planning to build more viaducts and roll out wildlife crossing awareness at driving schools after recording more than 2,000 roadkill cases on the peninsula over five years, many involving endangered animals.

Between 2012 to 2016, wildlife roadkills have included not only the more common Monitor Lizards (Varanus spp.) (667 cases) and Macaques (Macaca spp.) (393) but also endangered animals such as Malayan Tapirs (Tapirus indicus) (43), according to the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment in a statement this week.

In the first nine months of 2017, the Malayan Tapir topped the list of endangered animals killed on the road, followed by Asian Leopard Cats (Prionailurus bengalensis) (14), Elephants (Elephas maximus) (2), Binturong or Asian Bearcats (Arctictis binturong) (2) and one Leopard (Panthera pardus).

Johor recorded the highest number of incidents in the past five years with 494 such cases, followed by Kedah (479), Perak (394), Terengganu (310) and Negeri Sembilan (161).

“This totally senseless killing of our animals has to stop and is such a waste of our national heritage,” said minister Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar in a statement on Monday (Oct 16).

According to officials, wildlife roadkill incidents usually occur at night, when the animal is trying to cross a road or highway from one area of forest to another in search of food, mates “or seeking more suitable habitat for its survival”.

In August, a pair of Tapirs were killed by a motorist at the Gebeng bypass, days after an Elephant died when a tour bus ran into it in Perak.

Last year, a critically endangered Malayan Tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni) which was pregnant with two cubs was run over by a car headed to Kuala Terengganu.

HELPING ANIMALS GET TO THE OTHER SIDE

Malaysia’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks (PERHILITAN) has so far installed 236 warning signs at 133 roadkill hotspots to warn drivers to slowdown.

“Please slow down when you see these warning signs,” said Dr Wan Junaidi.

“It is indeed disheartening to know that some drivers tend to speed up when they see those animal crossing signs.”

Dr Pazil Abdul Patah, the director of the Department of Biodiversity Conservation at PERHILITAN told Channel NewsAsia that his department is in talks with driving schools across the country to incorporate wildlife crossing awareness into their curriculums by next year.

Three viaducts have also been built specifically to help wildlife cross safely, with plans for more.

“It has been positive to see a lot of wildlife have been using the viaducts – Elephants, Sun Bears (Helarctos malayanus), Tapirs, Deers (F. Cervidae), Wild Boars (Sus scrofa) and smaller animals like Civet Cats (F. Viverridae) and Flat-headed Cats (Prionailurus planiceps),” said Dr Pazil.

Dr Wan Junaidi told Channel NewsAsia most road builders have been told to create wildlife-friendly viaducts when building through forests and sanctuaries as well.

However, environmentalists are concerned that roadkill incidents will only increase with several major rail projects in the works – including the High-Speed Rail linking up Singapore to Malaysia and the East Coast Rail Link cutting across the Titiwangsa mountain range.

Dr Junaidi said that his officers are providing input on these projects for developers to include tunnels and viaducts for wildlife in their construction plans.

Source: Channel NewsAsia

It is learned that the driver escaped unhurt but the vehicle was severely damaged.
Photos: STR / Mohd Rafi Mamat, additional photos by Putera Haikal, on Di tanahku terjadinya bencana (#DTTB ) Facebook Group

Malaysia: 2 Tapirs die after being run over by car
By TN Alagesh, 26th August 2017;

Three days after an Elephant died when it was hit by a tour bus in Perak, a pair of Tapir suffered similar fate along the Gebeng bypass road near Kuantan on Friday.

The endangered Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus) were attempting to cross the dual-carriageway not far from the Jabor toll plaza about 10.30pm when a car crashed into the animals.

The driver escaped unhurt but the impact of the crash resulted the front part of the vehicle to be severely dented.

Passing motorists informed the State Wildlife and National Parks department(Perhilitan) about the carcasses about 11.30pm before staff were deployed to the scene.

The Tapirs, a male and a female aged between eight and 10 years, suffered severe injuries.

State Perhilitan director Ahmad Azhar Mohammed said the two Tapir weighing between 250kg and 280kg were crossing the road to look for food when the incident occurred.

He said to date, a total of five deaths caused by collision with vehicles were recorded in Pahang in the first eight months of this year.

“There has been similar incidents in the past including along the nearby Kuantan Port bypass road where the animals usually occupies the jungle and go out during the night to look for food,” he said, adding Perhilitan will put up more signboards for Tapir crossings to remind motorist to be careful when they drive along certain roads.

Meanwhile, a Perhilitan staff described the incident as devastating as two Tapir were killed simultaneously and such cases were rare.

“Land clearing activities has ruined their habitat and the increasing number of activities near Gebeng here has forced the animals to travel further to find for food. A quick solution has to be implemented or else similar tragic road deaths could become more frequent.

"In the past there were cases when the Tapir dies in an accident, certain body parts including its tail, ears and tongue were removed by irresponsible individuals. In this case, the passing motorist were quick to alert Perhilitan,” he said.

It is estimated that only between 1,100 and 1,500 Tapirs remain in the wild in Peninsular Malaysia, and concentrated in protected areas, such as Taman Negara and wildlife reserves. They are classified as a totally protected species under the Wildlife Conservation Act 2010.

On Wednesday, a 10-year-old bull Elephant (Elephas maximus) was killed after it was hit by a tour bus along the Grik-Jeli Highway in Perak at about 5.30am. The animal collapsed and then got up and walked to the grass on the road shoulder before it died.

Source: New Straits Times

This morning we lost yet another Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus) due to road kill. The male Tapir was hit by an ongoing vehicle in front of the exit to ecoCare centre, Kerteh, Terengganu. It is even sad to find out that someone had cut off the tongue and tail of this poor animal.

Source: Malaysian Nature Society Facebook

Malaysia: Man, protector of wildlife, kills 1,914 wild animals in road accidents since 2011

14th July 2016;

Natural Resources and Environment Minister Datuk Seri Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar said today that Man, who has the responsibility of protecting wildlife, has killed 1,914 wild animals such as Civets (F. Viverridae), Wild Boars (Sus scrofa vittatus), Marbled Cats (Pardofelis marmorata) and Tapirs (Tapirus indicus) in road accidents since 2011.

Mammals were among the wildlife with the most number killed in these accidents, and they totalled 1,110, he said.

These protected species were killed on federal, state and municipal roads involving 61 road and highway networks in the whole country, he said in a statement here.

“This conflict between man and wildlife can be averted if operators of development and utility projects have a high level of concern about the importance of wildlife and their conservation and protection.

"We have to understand that wildlife depend totally on us to protect them and that they too have a right to live on this earth,” he said.

Wan Junaidi said the department had taken several proactive measures to address the issue, among them installing 236 wildlife crossing road signs at 133 hotspots in peninsular Malaysia.

“These road signs remind motorists to slow down their vehicles at these spots,” he said.

He also said that 37 transverse bar sets and 24 units of solar amber light had been installed at eight locations along the Central Forest Spine.

“The department has also build viaducts for wildlife crossing at three wildlife corridor locations, in Sungai Deka, Terengganu; Sungai Yu, Pahang and Gerik, Perak, to address the ‘roadkill’ problem,” he said.

Source: New Straits Times

Malaysia: Man, protector of wildlife, kills 1,914 wild animals in road accidents since 2011