A rotting carcass of a baleen whale (F. Balaenopteridae) stranded in Malay, Aklan yesterday.

Source: Radyo Todo 88.5 FM Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

Photos: Tribun Pontianak, BPSPL Pontianak, Pontianak Post, Chai Jie Fung Facebook

Apologies for the slow updates. A code 4 whale of 4 m length was found at Sungai Batang (Kec. Sungai Pinyuh, Kab. Mempawah, West Kalimantan) 3 weeks ago, but we just received the update today from a local newspaper Tribun News Pontianak. It looks like a baleen whale (Mysticeti), but the condition has deteriorated so much now that ID is a bit difficult. Samples are currently being obtained by BPSPL Pontianak. News from Dwi Suprapti, WWF Indonesia.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

The badly decomposed remains of an unidentified 10-metre long Baleen Whale (Mysticeti) were washed up on the coast of Khong Yai District in Trat Province.

Source: Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) of Thailand Facebook

A possible candidate would be the Bryde’s Whale, which is known to inhabit the Gulf of Thailand. The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Both species(?) have been recorded from tropical waters of Southeast Asia.

The carcass of a Rorqual (Balaenoptera sp.) estimated to be around 11 metres in length was found floating off the coast of Chumphon Province.

Source: Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) of Thailand Facebook

A possible candidate would be the Bryde’s Whale, which is known to inhabit the Gulf of Thailand. The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Both species(?) have been recorded from tropical waters of Southeast Asia.

A code 3, unidentified Whale was found dead in the waters of Gerokgak, Buleleng Bali, nearby Atlas South Sea Pearl Farm. The Atlas staff and the locals are now trying to haul the whale for further identification etc. Thanks to Hanggar Prasetyo for the news. Photo from Atlas South Sea Pearl.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia

Other photos have revealed that this was a Bryde’s Whale (Balaenoptera edeni).

The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Sittang or Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Both species(?) have been recorded from tropical waters of Southeast Asia.

Photos: BFAR Bikol Facebook

Philippines: Dead Whale found afloat in Balatan coast
18th April 2016;

A dead baleen whale, known as Bryde’s Whale (Balaenoptera edeni), was found floating along Camangahan village coast in Balatan town, 52 kilometers from Naga City on Wednes, April 13.

The Bryde’s Whale, pronounced as “broo-dess”, was named after a whaler and ship owner Johan Bryde. It is known as the Tropical Whale as it is the only baleen whale species that lives in warmer waters.

Its body measured approximately 8 to 10 meters and was already in an advanced stage of decomposition when found.

Nonie P. Enolva, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources spokesperson in Bicol said that it is imposible to conduct necropsy on the Whale’s carcass because it is in its advanced stage of decomposition and estimated to be dead for at least 1 to 2 weeks.

She added that there were attempts to sink the Whale’s body to the bottom of sea as they found ropes with rocks tied around carcass.

The BFAR-Bikol rescue team burned the Whale’s carcass on Monday afternoon of April 18 as it was difficult to sink it down at sea due to its weight and unpleasant odor.

The Bryde’s Whale is the second to be stranded in Bicol this year. The first one is a calf Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) washed ashore in Cambulaga, Sorsogon City in March 10.

Source: BFAR Regional News

The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Sittang or Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Both species(?) have been recorded from tropical waters of Southeast Asia.

  1. Experts from the Phuket Marine Biological Centre (PMBC) collected bone and tissue samples in the hope of determining what caused the death of the Bryde’s Whale.
  2. The remains of the Bryde’s Whale were buried on site on the beach, and covered with lime to prevent contamination.

Photos: PMBC

Thailand: Missing Bryde’s Whale carcass washes up on beach north of Phuket
By Tanyaluk Sakoot, 15th April 2016;

The missing Bryde’s Whale (Balaenoptera edeni) carcass spotted by tourists north of Phuket two days ago has been found washed ashore at Thai Muaeng Beach, in Phang Nga province.

Marine life experts from the Phuket Marine Biological Centre (PMBC) launched a search for the 20-metre-long Whale carcass after it was spotted by tourists about 12 nautical miles from Tab Lamu Pier, near the Similans National Park, on Wednesday (Apr 13).

The carcass was expected to reach the Sarasin Bridge, at the northern tip of Phuket, late that afternoon. (See story here)

“At first we thought it would turn up somewhere on a Phuket beach, or maybe near the Sarasin Bridge,” Dr Rachawadee Jantra of the PMBC told The Phuket News.

“But our team spotted the carcass at Thai Mueang Beach, about 1.5 kilometres from the Khao Lampi National Park, at about 6pm yesterday (Apr 14).”

PMBC experts confirmed that the Bryde’s Whale was female, Dr Rachawadee said.

“Tissue and bone samples have been collected to take to our laboratory so we can determine the cause of death of the mammal,” she added.

“We are not sure what the caused the death, but we are certain that it was not from a fishing net. Our team did not find any food or obstruction in its digestive system either,” Dr Rachawadee said.

The Whale’s remains have been buried on site at the beach.

“We brought in a backhoe to bury the body deep under the sand and covered it with lime to prevent any contamination,” Dr Rachawadee said.

Source: Phuket News

The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Sittang or Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Both species(?) have been recorded from tropical waters of Southeast Asia.