What is killing fishes at Pasir Ris?
By Ria Tan, 25th February 2015;

I headed out in the afternoon to see if dead fishes were washing up at Pasir Ris Park beach.

There was a huge dead barracuda, and a few other large dead fishes. I didn’t see many dead farm fishes. Dead wild fishes were also reported over the last two days at Sembawang and Changi. The risks of fish deaths are rising in the weeks ahead as there will be no good spring tide to flush the waters around Pasir Ris and Pulau Ubin until April.

I checked out the western side of Pasir Ris today, the same stretch I checked three days ago on 22 Feb (Sat). Alas, today I came too late and the cleaner had already cleaned the high water tide line for the day. So I only checked the low water line of the most recent tide.

I also surveyed a stretch of beach wasn’t cleaned yet. So I could check the high water tide line for today. Here, I saw a few very crispy large dead fishes.

I also surveyed the western stretch of shoreline that is outside the Pasir Ris Park proper and thus is not cleaned at all. Here, I saw some really large dead fishes.

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Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

Fishes dying at Pasir Ris?
By Ria Tan, 22nd February 2015;

I heard the water was not quite right at Pasir Ris. So I had a quick look there yesterday.

I saw white powdery insoluble stuff deposited at most recent mid-tide line. Dead fishes of various kinds large and small every 20 steps or so. More below about why it is important for human health, to find out what is killing the fishes.

I saw dead fishes of various kinds large and small, wild and farmed, every 20 steps or so. Thanks to IDs provided by friends on my early Facebook post, here’s some tentative IDs.

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Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

1-2. Very large dead fish probably washed up at most recent high tide.
3. I saw about 20 of these small dead groupers.
4-5. Other dead fishes seen.

I heard the water was not quite right at pasir ris. So had a quick look. White powdery insoluble stuff deposited at most recent tide line. Dead fishes of various kinds large and small every 20 steps or so. Beginning of plankton bloom? Will blog later.

Ria Tan Facebook

The fishes pictured are Pickhandle Barracuda (Sphyraena jello) (1-2), some sort of juvenile Grouper (Epinephelus sp.) (3), Talang Queenfish (Scomberoides commersonnianus) (4) and Snubnose Pompano (Trachinotus blochii) (5). The young Groupers and possibly the Snubnose Pompano are likely to have originated from the fish farms offshore, but the Pickhandle Barracuda and Talang Queenfish are wild fishes that were possibly also affected by the adverse environmental conditions.