Daily Decay (19th June 2018)

Daily Decay (19th June 2018): Giant Honeybee (Apis dorsata) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

There was a large colony located next to a trail, and due to safety reasons, the hive had to be removed. Pest control was called in, and this was among the many casualties.

Daily Decay (23rd February 2018)

 
Daily Decay (23rd February 2018): Giant Honeybees (Apis dorsata) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

There was a large colony located next to a trail, and due to safety reasons, the hive had to be removed. Pest control was called in, and these were among the many casualties.
 

Daily Decay (30th January 2018)

Daily Decay (30th January 2018): Giant Honeybee (Apis dorsata) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

There was a large colony located next to a trail, and due to safety reasons, the hive had to be removed. Pest control was called in, and this was one of the many casualties.

Daily Decay (13th January 2018)

Daily Decay (13th January 2018): Giant Honeybee (Apis dorsata) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

There was a large colony located next to a trail, and due to safety reasons, the hive had to be removed. Pest control was called in, and this was one of the many casualties.

Blue Carpenter Bee

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Blue Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa caerulea)
Henderson Waves, 3rd January 2018

 

Yellow and Black Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa aestuans) (?)
Seletar West, 4th October 2013

Older sources refer to Xylocopa confusa, a name that is actually a junior synonym for Xylocopa aestuans. Confusingly enough, females of another species of carpenter bee, Xylocopa nigroflavescens, appear nearly identical to those of Xylocopa aestuans except for some minor differences in external morphology. Both species occur in Singapore, and it is difficult to differentiate females of Xylocopa aestuans from Xylocopa nigroflavescens in the field. On the other hand, the males are more readily distinguished.

Assorted insects found in Singapore, representing several major groups:

  • Butterflies & Moths (Lepidoptera)
  • Beetles (Coleoptera)
  • Bees, Wasps & Ants (Hymenoptera)
  • Flies (Diptera)
  • Dragonflies & Damselflies (Odonata)
  • Earwigs (Dermaptera)
  • Cockroaches & Termites (Blattodea)
  • Mantises (Mantodea)
  • Stick & Leaf Insects (Phasmatodea)
  • Grasshoppers, Crickets & Katydids (Orthoptera)
  • True Bugs (Hemiptera)

Insects are among the most diverse groups of animals, with more than a million species described (and counting), representing more than half of all known organisms! Despite their small size, the sheer number of insects and the countless niches they occupy mean that they actually play critical roles in various ecosystems. Butterflies and dragonflies are colourful and often highly visible, whereas many other groups are poorly studied in the tropics. Singapore is home to an extremely rich and diverse insect fauna that occupies all sorts of habitats, and we are still discovering new species of insects all the time.

These were some of the many specimens featured at the recently concluded Festival of Biodiversity 2014, which was held at VivoCity last weekend.

Giant Honeybee (Apis dorsata)
National University of Singapore (NUS) campus, 4th December 2012

Giant Honeybees

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Giant Honeybees (Apis dorsata)
Tessensohn Road, 5th May 2012

This fragment of a colony of Giant Honeybees was seen by Amanda Tan. It’s likely that this nest had been wiped out by pest control.

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