Daily Decay (3rd March 2018)

Daily Decay (3rd March 2018): Skull of Domestic Cat (Felis silvestris catus) @ Buona Vista

This skull of a Domestic Cat was found along the KTM railway tracks that run through Buona Vista, back when the trains still travelled along this stretch. It had most probably been killed by a passing train.

Picked up this owl carcass on 23 March 2014 after it collided with a building and thought it was just an ordinary Brown Boobook (Ninox scutulata), which is known to reside in and migrate through Singapore.

After a tip off from a fellow ornithologist, I took a closer look at the wing formula and surprise, surprise, it’s actually a Northern Boobook (Ninox japonica), a new species record for Singapore and a considerable extension of the species’s migratory range southward down the Malay Peninsula.

My colleagues and I have published a paper based on this carcass and several other recent records of the species in the region, which is available here: DNA reveals long-distance partial migratory behavior in a cryptic owl lineage

Source: David Tan, on Dead Birds Facebook Group

Last March I was going for my morning walk when I spotted a medium sized bird lying dead on the pavement alongside one of the science buildings. People were walking past, but also stopping to look at it. I really wanted to get to that bird before it was picked up by one of the cleaners and thrown away. I managed to get there in time – it was beautiful and with no external damage – it didn’t appear to have been dead long.
I brought it home to photograph and pass on to David Tan. I had vague thoughts of drawing the bird but for some reason was really pressed for time.

Not being any sort of bird specialist, I didn’t realise it was an owl species, and definitely didn’t realise how special it was. Here are a couple of photos of the bird. It had come a long way from home…

Source: Tanglin Halt Wildlife Watch Facebook

This carcass has been identified as that of a Northern Boobook (Ninox japonica), the first official record of this species from Singapore.

Please don’t club your friendly neighbourhood Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus). They help you control the rat population. Call Acres wildlife rescue helpline (24hr) at +65 9783 7782 if you need assistance.

Source: Joelle Lai Facebook

Strange things to do at 1.30AM… We were informed of a 2m dead Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) along Portsdown Road.

I thought it might have been roadkill, but it looked more like a deliberate blow to the head.

If you see a python or any snake, don’t try to kill it! Also, don’t call pest control on these poor creatures. These are native animals! Call ACRES or AVA.

Source: Sankar Ananthanarayanan Instagram

Found this morning. 😦 Distinctive red marking on its beak. Looks like an injury to its neck.

Source: Tanglin Halt Wildlife Watch Facebook

Today we picked up a gorgeous female Thick-billed Green Pigeon (Treron curvirostra) from around the one-north area that died of as-yet undetermined causes.

Although usually found in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, Thick-billed Green Pigeons often forage for fruits in the fringing woodlands outside the central forests as well.

Source: David Tan Instagram

Common Kingfisher

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Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis)
Buona Vista, 13th September 2012

This photograph of a Common Kingfisher carcass was shared by Mark Brian Raphael on Facebook.

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