Daily Decay (13th May 2018)

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Daily Decay (13th May 2018): Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of yet another fish mass mortality event that was triggered by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor in February and March 2015.

Sagor Catfish

 

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Sagor Catfish (Hexanematichthys sagor)
Yishun Dam, 26th October 2013

These photographs of a Sagor Catfish were shared by ‘Nikita Hengbok’.

African Walking Catfish

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African Walking Catfish (Clarias gariepinus)
Kampong Java Park, 24th September 2016

This dead African Walking Catfish was spotted by Kian Min Yeo, and shared to Monday Morgue’s Facebook page.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue too.

Daily Decay (28th February 2018)

Daily Decay (28th February 2018): Eeltail Catfish (F. Plotosidae) @ Changi

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in February 2014, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor. Three species of Eeltail Catfish are present in Singapore waters – the Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus), Black Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus canius), and White-lipped Eeltail Catfish (Paraplotosus albilabris). Due to the decomposed state of this carcass, it’s not clear which species it is.

Source: Hilbert Montell Facebook

Some of the dead fishes seen in Sungai Oya in Sarawak, presumably casualties of a recent mass mortality event. Two of the fishes in these photos are identifiable as Fire Eel (Mastacembelus erythrotaenia), while the other two are of unidentifiable Catfishes (Siluriformes).

 

Malaysia: No reason found yet on why lobsters, fish in Oya River died


Source: Berita Harian

22nd February 2018;

The mass surfacing and and subsequent dying of aquatic life, particularly lobsters prawns and fish, in Oya River, Dalat that went viral on social media could have been caused by many factors, including poisoning.

Nanoplankton specialist Musa Musbah said 20 to 30 years ago, such phenomenon occurred not only in Dalat river but also in other rivers in Sarawak including in Niah and Sibuti areas in Miri, with varying degrees.

He was asked to comment on the so-called ‘drunken phenomenon’ of aquatic life in Oya River, which drew many comments on his Facebook page.

Musa reminded those who doubted the safety of such prawns or fish sold in the market to temporarily avoid eating them until the authorities come up with their findings and give assurance that whatever is caught from the river is safe to consume.

He did not deny that there might be some individuals who used poison to catch fish and prawns due to ignorance on its impact on health, while there might be others who did it for quick profit.

Meanwhile, Natural Resources and Environment Minister Dato Sri Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar was reported in the local media as saying that the Department of Environment (DoE) would investigate and study the causes of the phenomenon.

Source: The Borneo Post

Those are not lobsters, but Giant River Prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), while the fish in the photo appears to be a Helicopter Catfish (Wallagonia leerii).

 

Malaysia: Visitor released fish into lake

 

Photos: Rahayusnida Roosley Facebook

21st February 2018;

The mystery behind scores of dead fish found floating in Tasik Permaisuri Park, Cheras, may have been solved.

A visitor was reportedly seen releasing a batch of Catfish into the lake on Saturday morning, a day before a large number of fish were found floating in the lake, giving out a foul smell.

Kuala Lumpur City Hall corporate planning director Fadzilah Abd Rashid said the fish likely died as they could not adapt to the new environment.

“The maintenance and administration team did not receive any request from the public to release fish into the lake.”

Fadzilah said similar incidents happened last year, where fish reared as pets were released into lakes around the city.

Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Ministry’s deputy secretary-general (policy), Datuk Sallehhuddin Hassan, said the Fisheries Department had collected fish samples for tests.

“We sent our officers to take samples of the lake water and fish,” he said, adding that the ministry would work with the Department of Environment on the matter.

The Fisheries Department, in a statement, said images posted on social media showed that the dead fish belonged to the Catfish species.

“A team was despatched to check the site after a report was lodged by the public.”

He said the turbidity and oxygen levels in the lake were normal.

It was learned that the department had not approved any fish-breeding programmes in the park.

Source: New Straits Times

The photos show what are likely to be Walking Catfish (F. Clariidae). Several species are raised for food in Malaysia, such as the native Common Walking Catfish (Clarias aff. batrachus), the possibly non-native Broadhead Catfish (Clarias macrocephalus), and the introduced Clarias gariepinus, as well as hybrids between the three species.