Thailand: Injured Long-tailed Macaque Arrives at WFFT for Urgent Care
26th May 2016;

Two days ago we received a call from a compassionate Thai tourist who had seen a Macaque in urgent need of help at a temple approximately an hour away from the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre. The WFFT Wildlife Rescue Team headed out immediately to try and save him. Upon arrival the team found the adult male Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lying on the ground almost motionless. The team investigated further into how this Macaque had ended up on the floor with what appeared to be serious injuries. After talking to the monks of the temple, they were told that the Macaque had fallen out of tree a few days ago due to heavy rain storms, unable to move from the injuries sustained, he had been lying on the ground since the incident. The monks had tried to feed him and give him water, we were told he did not eat nor drink. The team loaded him into the the rescue vehicle and took him directly to a local veterinary clinic for an x-ray to determine how severe the injuries were. The results of the x-ray show that he has both a severely broken arm and leg. He also has numerous, what look like, bite wounds on his chin, these may have been caused by other Monkeys or Feral Dogs. He was taken straight to the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre for treatment.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

The WFFT Vet Team performed surgery in an attempt to mend his broken bones. The Macaque is currently in intensive care at the WFFT Wildlife Hospital, after recovering from the surgery he is eating and drinking well. We hope that his injuries will mend and he can return home. We will keep you posted on his progress.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 1 of a 3-part photo set)

Thailand: Rest in Peace
26th April 2016;

A few days we received a call from a concerned man who had found a severely injured Macaque lying in the middle of one of the busiest highways in Thailand. This brave man got out of his car and stopped the traffic to prevent the Monkey colliding with any more vehicles. The man hoped that he could save the life of this poor Macaque. The male Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) was moved to to the side of the road, the man then called WFFT for help, we immediately sent the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Team to investigate. The Monkey was then taken to a local clinic for an ex-ray, the results of the x-ray revealed that this Macaque had a broken right arm and a dislocated shoulder, it also revealed that he has bullets lodged in his leg from previous ‘run-ins’ with humans.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

Sadly, this Macaque passed away within 24 hours of the WFFT Rescue Team being called to his aid. Rest in Peace Little One… You no longer need to fight for your life and deal with the unrelenting lack of empathy of some human beings.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Thailand: Another Special Soul is Lost
26th April 2016;

Yesterday we received a call from a concerned local man about a Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) that had been found by the side a busy road within a highly populated industrial area in Cha-am close to the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre. The compassionate local that found her thought she had been attacked by a pack of feral Dogs. The WFFT Rescue Team set out immediately to help this poor soul, after the initial health check, the vet team found a puncture wound on the right side of her head, and it seemed that she had some kind of nervous damage to the right side of her body. She was rushed directly to an animal hospital nearby so an x-ray could be performed. After examining the results of the x-ray it was found that a bullet was lodged in her head, not only this, we found that she was carrying an unborn infant. This is a bleak reminder of the challenges faced by our team and Thailand’s urban Macaques, those wild Macaques that live in close proximity to human settlements.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red list of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. Habitat loss and degradation due to human encroachment, pose the biggest threat to all Macaque species. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Increasing competition between Macaques and humans due to the increase in need of land for agriculture and other human activities is the foremost reason that Macaques are persecuted as pests.

Hostile encounters with Macaques are common in urban areas due to the active promotion of their presence for spiritual and entertainment purposes by provisioning food for the Macaques. We (humans) both promote population growth through the provision of food and the protection of habitat, and on the other hand we hinder it through the continued fragmentation of habitat, capture and exportation for research, and the pet trade.

Sadly, the brain damage caused by the soulless person who shot this Monkey in the head was to much for her to overcome. Along with her unborn baby, she is no longer with us, she is now at peace and will never again have to overcome the challenges of surviving in this heavily overpopulated world.

As the human population continues to grow exponentially the wild habitats of the species of the earth decrease, they die or they adapt. Ultimately we as humans must adapt to be able to co-exist with the other inhabitants of this world.

We at WFFT try, we help, we succeed and in some instances we do not suceed, however we will continue in any way possible to try and help animals in need.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Thailand: Dog Attack Long-tailed Macaque Rescued and Released
4th April 2016;

A few days ago some concerned locals brought a juvenile male Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) into the WFFT Wildlife Hospital for urgent treatment. He had been attacked by a Feral Dog close to the area in which he was living in Phetchaburi. Attacks on wild animals by Feral Dogs and Cats are very common here in Thailand, they often injure or kill several native wild animals, this can have long term detrimental affect on Thailand’s wild animals. Upon on arrival it was found that this little Macaque had numerous puncture wounds from the attack and he was very weak and unresponsive, we feared the worst.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red list of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

After spending a few days under special care at our Wildlife Hospital we saw great improvements. It was decided that returning him to the wild as soon as he was well enough was the best thing for this special little Monkey. Yesterday the team set off to return him home, it was a success as the little Monkey scampered off into the trees. This is a happy ending we unfortunately are unable to see for many of the animals that come through our doors, but for this one at least, he is free again!

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Thailand: Seriously Injured Pregnant Macaque Rescued
27th March 2016;

Yesterday we received a call about a seriously injured female Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) in a coastal area in Phetchaburi. She had fallen from a tree into the muddy water under a mangrove forest in which she lives. A villager found her unable to breathe with her face under the water and rescued her, he then took her home, washed and fed her then called us to help. Upon arrival it seems she has a deformed spine caused by an old injury and possibly some nerve damage. She was rushed to a local hospital for an x-ray; this confirmed the vet teams suspicion that she has a deformed spine, to our surprise the x-ray revealed that she is carrying a baby. She was then taken to the WFFT Wildlife Hospital for further treatment.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red list of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

She is currently receiving round the clock intensive care at the WFFT Wildlife Hospital. She is eating and drinking well, and is able to grasp some things with her hands. Her future is currently uncertain but we will do everything in our power to try and save this special soul and her baby. We will keep you posted on her progress.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 2 of a 2-part photo set)

Thailand: Seriously Injured Pregnant Macaque Rescued
27th March 2016;

Yesterday we received a call about a seriously injured female Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) in a coastal area in Phetchaburi. She had fallen from a tree into the muddy water under a mangrove forest in which she lives. A villager found her unable to breathe with her face under the water and rescued her, he then took her home, washed and fed her then called us to help. Upon arrival it seems she has a deformed spine caused by an old injury and possibly some nerve damage. She was rushed to a local hospital for an x-ray; this confirmed the vet teams suspicion that she has a deformed spine, to our surprise the x-ray revealed that she is carrying a baby. She was then taken to the WFFT Wildlife Hospital for further treatment.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red list of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

She is currently receiving round the clock intensive care at the WFFT Wildlife Hospital. She is eating and drinking well, and is able to grasp some things with her hands. Her future is currently uncertain but we will do everything in our power to try and save this special soul and her baby. We will keep you posted on her progress.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 1 of a 2-part photo set)

Thailand: Electrocuted Macaque Sparkie Returns Home
4th February 2016;

‘Sparkie’ the Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) returns home after spending the past 6 months recovering at the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre. Back in August of last year he was electrocuted after climbing on exposed power lines, he then fell into a busy road and collided with a moving vehicle. He sustained terrible burns over the most of his body, the damage to his right leg was irreversible so the WFFT Vet Team made the decision to amputate it. After spending months in recovery at WFFT he has made a great recovery and the best thing for this special little boy is to return to his homeland.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red list of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and is very adaptable.

Upon arrival to his home Sparkie recognized the area instantly, the transport cage was opened and off he ran into the forest. This is a great outcome as more often than not burn victims are fatally injured. See his rescue story here: http://on.fb.me/1TF8YiL

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand