Workers from Cleaners Ramky Cleantech Services loading the Dolphin carcass in the lorry.
Video: Ng Huiwen

Source: The Straits Times

Workers from Cleaners Ramky Cleantech Services wrapping up the Dolphin carcass in plastic bags and canvas sheets.
Video: Ng Huiwen

Source: The Straits Times

Workers from Cleaners Ramky Cleantech Services putting disinfectant around the Dolphin carcass.
Video: Ng Huiwen

Source: The Straits Times

Workers from Cleaners Ramky Cleantech Services putting disinfectant around the carcass.
Video: Ng Huiwen

Source: The Straits Times

Flies buzzing around the carcass of an Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis) washed up on the beach at East Coast Park.
Video: Lim Yaohui

Source: The Straits Times

Video of the carcass of an Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis) washed up on the beach at East Coast Park.
Video: Ng Huiwen

Source: The Straits Times

The National Parks Board and Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum will decide on what to do with the Dolphin’s carcass today. Dolphins are not uncommon in waters off Singapore‚Äôs southern shore.
Photo: Ong Wee Jin

Carcass of Dolphin washes up on East Coast Park beach
By Linette Lai & Audrey Tan, 7th July 2016;

What appeared to be the carcass of a Dolphin washed up on a beach at East Coast Park yesterday afternoon.

The area was deserted when The Straits Times arrived at about 8pm.

It is unclear how the Dolphin’s carcass, which was slightly less than 2m long, had got there.

But Dolphins are not uncommon in waters off Singapore’s southern shore.

The Straits Times understands that both the National Parks Board and Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum are aware of the Dolphin’s carcass, and will decide what to do about it today.

There have been previous cases of marine mammals being found in local waters.

In July last year, a Sperm Whale’s (Physeter macrocephalus) 10m-long carcass was found floating off Jurong Island. The species had never previously been found in the waters around Singapore or peninsular Malaysia.

Last month, a dead Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) was found at Pulau Tekukor, one of Singapore’s southern islands.

Mr Stephen Beng, chairman of the marine conservation group of the Nature Society (Singapore), said more marine mammals and reptiles have been spotted in Singapore waters.

“These animals must surface to breathe and are exposed to many risks, such as boat strikes, ingesting plastic and being entangled in discarded fishing nets,” he said.

“With the death of the Turtle, and now this Dolphin, it is important to find out the cause of death so we can monitor and reduce threats to our marine environment which are under our control.”

Source: The Straits Times

Photo of the carcass of an Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis) washed up on the beach at East Coast Park. The Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum has been notified; hopefully the carcass can be salvaged.

Source: Nigel Lim Facebook

Photos: Khaosod

Thailand: Chinese White Dolphin found dead on Tha Sala Beach in Nakhon Si Thammarat Province
By Jettana Pantana & Sirinthip Sitabutr, 6th May 2016;

A corpse of a Chinese White Dolphin (Sousa chinensis) was found on Tha Sala Beach in Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, with wounds from fishing equipment.

The corpse was approximately 2.5 meters long and weighted 200 kilograms, with traumatic abrasions on the body and mouth.

Sayan Sahakul, a 38 year old local, revealed that the corpse was the largest of its kind sighted in 1 year. Dozens of Dolphins have been found dead in the past year, sparking concerns of an impending extinction of the species in the region.

Source: National News Bureau of Thailand

Photographs by Nick Baker

Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis) at Air Papan, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia

Location: Air Papan Beach, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.

Habitat: Coastal, shallow marine

Date and time: 03 June 2014, 18:45 hrs.

Description of observation: : A dead specimen, with an estimated total length of 2.0 metres, was observed floating in the sea, 100 metres from the beach. Over the next 30 minutes it was pushed towards the shore by wave action, and then finally coming to rest on the beach (Fig. 2.). A group of local people showed interest in the dead dolphin, but did not touch the body (Fig. 1).

Remarks: The subject is identified as Sousa chinensis based on the size and triangular shape of its dorsal fin, and on its relatively long, slender beak. The colour of this specimen is grey dorsally, and white ventrally: the species can vary considerably in colour from grey to pure white to pink, and can grow to 2.4-2.8 metres in length (Francis, 2008).

The specimen showed no obvious external injury, however a constant stream of blood was seen issuing from the corner of the mouth, suggesting it had only recently died from illness or trauma (Fig. 3.). The body appeared fresh, and exhibited no smell.

Sousa chinensis occurs in warmer waters of the eastern Indian and western Pacific oceans, as well as coastal waters in the South China Sea. Jefferson & Smith (2015) list the range countries as follows: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia (Sumatra, Java, Borneo), Malaysia, China, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam (records from other countries are considered as unconfirmed or extralimital). Peninsular Malaysia therefore lies in the heart of the range of this species.

Air Papan is a sandy beach two kilometres in length facing northeastwards to the South China Sea. It is bounded by rocky headlands to the northwest and southeast. It is a popular holiday beach, with a profile that appears to be gently sloping.

References:

  • Francis, C. M. (2008). A Field Guide to the Mammals of South-East Asia. New Holland Publishers (UK) Ltd. 392 pp.
  • Jefferson, T. A. & Smith, B. D. (2015). Re-assessment of the conservation status of the Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis) using the IUCN Red List Criteria. Advances in Marine Biology: Humpback Dolphins (Sousa spp.): Current Status and Conservation, Part 2. 73: 1-21.

Source: Southeast Asia Vertebrate Records 2016: 58-60