Daily Decay (20th April 2018)

Daily Decay (20th April 2018): Unidentified Cichlid (F. Cichlidae) @ Kranji

This carcass is too decomposed to be conclusively identified; there are several species of Cichlids that can be found in coastal waters around Kranji, such as Tilapia (Oreochromis spp.), Green Chromide (Etroplus suratensis), and Mayan Cichlid (Mayaheros urophthalmus). It’s also possible that the carcass may have been flushed out from the nearby Kranji Reservoir, which harbours other Cichlid species that are found in freshwater, such as Eartheater (Geophagus altifrons).

Daily Decay (21st February 2018)

Daily Decay (21st February 2018): Red Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Red Tilapia are hybrids, typically between Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), although other species have also been involved. They are commonly raised in fish farms for human consumption, and escapees are regularly seen in some parts of Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve.

Daily Decay (4th February 2018)

Daily Decay (4th February 2018): Red Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Red Tilapia are mostly hybrids, typically between Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), although some Red Tilapia strains have involved crossing other species such as Blue Tilapia (Oreochromis aureus) and Wami Tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis hornorum). There are also red-coloured mutants of Nile and Mozambique Tilapia. Red Tilapia are commonly raised in fish farms for human consumption, and escapees are regularly seen in some parts of Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve.

Orinoco Peacock Bass

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Orinoco Peacock Bass (Cichla orinocensis)
Coney Island (Pulau Serangoon), 25th April 2017

This Orinoco Peacock Bass was found dead along the shore of Coney Island. Being a freshwater fish, its presence along the coast was unusual. It is possible that this fish was living in the nearby Serangoon Reservoir, but was unfortunately washed into the sea when the tidal gates were opened. Unable to cope with marine conditions, it would have been killed by prolonged exposure to saltwater, and then subsequently washed up on the beach with the tides.

Daily Decay (19th January 2018)

Daily Decay (19th January 2018): Green Chromide (Etroplus suratensis) @ Coney Island (Pulau Serangoon)

Malaysia: Caged fish breeders suffer major losses due to flood

13th January 2018;

The flood that hit the district early this month had not only caused damage to public and private properties, but also caused major losses to caged fish breeders here as they were left with thousands of dead fish.

Most of the breeders attributed the death of their fish to several reasons, including the strong river current on Jan 1 and 2 when the water level of Sungai Pahang began to rise.

Khaidir Ahmad, 55, from Kampung Tebing Tinggi, Lebak here, when contacted today said he suffered losses of more than RM33,000 after over 5,000 patin (Iridescent Shark Catfish) (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and Tilapia (Oreochromis spp.), as well as 300 kerai (Lemon-fin Barb) (Hypsibarbus wetmorei) fish, in his cages died during the flood.

He said the strong river current had caused the fish to suffer wounds as they were cornered and squeezed to the cage.

“The fish were also believed to have died due to the high turbidity level of the river which caused the fish gills to be covered with mud and deprived them of oxygen,” he said, adding that bacterial infection in the eyes and scales of the fish due to the deterioration in the water quality of Sungai Pahang was also believed to be the cause of death of the fish.

Meanwhile, Temerloh Fisheries Officer Shahidan Roslan said the Fisheries Department had taken samples from the live fish in order to determine the cause of death of thousands of caged fish of several breeders in the district.

He said the department had also informed the state Fisheries Department Bio-security Division, immediately after receiving a report on the incident.

Shahidan said initial inspection found that the death of patin and Tilapia fish was probably due to the strong river water pressure during the recent flood.

“The investigation revealed that most of the dead fish were found in the front area of the cage which might have received the high impact of the strong current,” he said.

Source: The Sun Daily

Philippines: Virus strikes Bulacan pond, kills 101,383 Tilapia – report

By Jasper Y. Arcalas, 7th December 2017;

The lethal Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV) has arrived in the Philippines, killing 101,383 Tilapia (likely Nile Tilapia) (Oreochromis niloticus) in a lone Bulacan-based pond in June, the Department of Agriculture (DA) said.

In a notification submitted to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Agriculture Assistant Secretary for Livestock Enrico P. Garzon said TiLV killed 101,363 Tilapia out of the 300,000 susceptible population in a Bulacan-based pond, representing a 33.78-percent mortality rate.

Garzon added the outbreak was confirmed last June 29 and has already been resolved by the DA on September 15.

“An unexplained daily mortality of Tilapia fingerlings was observed in the nursery pond of a private farm after stocking on May 16, 2017. Elevated mortality after 15 days reached approximately 25 percent. Affected fish showed distended abdomen and bulging of the eyes,” he said in the notification dated November 23.

Garzon said on May 31, the DA collected samples from the affected farm and were submitted to the Fisheries Biotechnology Center (FBC) in Muñoz, Nueva Ecija.

“Semi-nested RT-PCR exhibited positive results using reported Tilapia Lake Virus [TiLV] primers. Other samples submitted to National Fisheries Laboratory- Fish Health of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources also showed positive results by insulated isothermal PCR [iiPCR],” he said.

The DA official added the laboratory results indicated that the “amplified 3 segment of the viral ENE [expression and nuclear retention element] has 94 to 95 percent nucleotide similarity to Israel TiLV strain.”

Garzon said the movement of fingerlings from the affected pond has been restricted and monitored. He added that the results of the last two samplings showed negative for TiLV.

On May 26 the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations warned countries of TiLV as it is considered a “lethal threat” to food security.

“The outbreak should be treated with concern and countries importing Tilapia should take appropriate risk-management measures—intensifying diagnostics testing, enforcing health certificates, deploying quarantine measures and developing contingency plans,” the FAO said.

“Tilapia-producing countries need to be vigilant, and should follow aquatic animal-health code protocols of the World Organisation for Animal Health when trading Tilapia. They should initiate an active surveillance program to determine the presence or absence of TiLV, the geographic extent of the infection and identify risk factors that may help contain it,” the FAO added.

The FAO said the TiLV poses no public health concern, but could decimate infected populations. The TiLV has been reported in at least five countries in three continents: Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, Israel and Thailand, according to the FAO.

“Tilapia are the second most important aquaculture species in volume terms, providing food, jobs and domestic and export earnings for millions of people, including many smallholders,” it said.

“In 2015 world Tilapia production, from both aquaculture and capture, amounted to 6.4 million tons, with an estimated value of $9.8 billion, and worldwide trade was valued at $1.8 billion,” the FAO added.

Source: Business Mirror

Philippines: Virus strikes Bulacan pond, kills 101,383 Tilapia – report