Local villagers help to haul the 3.3 metre male Croc up the bank of Sg Rimbas in Pusa.
Photo: Sarawak Voice

Malaysia: SFC: Two male Crocs put down in Pusa culling operation
25th October 2017;

Two male Estuarine Crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) were culled from the waters of Sungai Rimbas, Pusa by Sarawak Forestry Corporation’s (SFC) Swift Wildlife Action Team (SWAT) over the past few days.

In a press statement issued yesterday, SFC disclosed that SWAT members installed 13 baited hooks along a 5-kilometre stretch of Sungai Rimbas on Oct 17.

“The very next day, a big 4.8-metre Croc was hooked and culled. More recently, another two Crocodiles had been caught,” the statement said, adding the latter two reptiles measured 3.3 metres and 2.8 metres in length respectively.

The decision to cull the two male reptiles was made due to the relatively high density of Crocodiles prevailing in that area.

Given the successful culling exercise, operations at Sungai Rimbas were called off on Sunday,“ it added.

SFC also expressed the corporation’s gratitude to all parties involved, particularly the police and local villagers for assistance rendered during the culling operation.

Members of the public are reminded to notify the nearest Forest Department or SFC offices of Crocodile sightings in their areas, and to not take matters into their own hands owing to the extremely dangerous nature of the reptiles.

Source: The Borneo Post

The 4.8 metre Crocodile culled at Sungai Rimbas in Pusa.
Photos: Kami Boikot Buletin Utama TV3 Facebook and Saharudin Rahman Facebook

Malaysia: Human remains in culled Crocodile confirmed as Bentayan’s
20th October 2017;

Police have confirmed that human remains found inside an Estuarine Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) culled by Sarawak Forestry Corporation (SFC) on Wednesday was that of Bentayan Ilah from Kampung Tambak.

This was disclosed by SFC who noted that Bentayan’s remains have since been handed to his family for burial yesterday.

The corporation said the Crocodile was culled during an operation at Sungai Rimbas in Pusa on Wednesday.

“SFC’s Swift Wildlife Action Team (SWAT) comprising personnel from Kuching and Sibu was dispatched to the location to hunt down the Crocodile which recently attacked and killed Bentayan.

"The team installed 13 baited hooks along a five kilometre stretch of Sungai Rimbas and managed to take down the 4.8 metre Crocodile yesterday (Wednesday) evening,” said an SFC spokesperson in a statement yesterday.

He added that a post mortem was carried out yesterday morning in the presence of police officers and the victim’s family.

“Some body parts were found inside the Crocodile’s abdomen and they were sent to the police for forensic DNA analysis.”

On Sept 24, Bentayan was attacked by the Crocodile during a fishing trip with his cousin along the riverbank around 3.30pm.

A search and rescue (SAR) operation to locate the 31-year-old was carried out and after three days, the SAR team found body parts which were later identified and confirmed by family members as from the victim.

Meanwhile, in two separate cases, the SWAT teams dispatched to Sungai Kawi in Bintangor and an oil palm estate at Suai in Miri also managed to cull two Crocodiles measuring at 3.87m and 3.9m respectively.

In both locations, there have been reports of human-Crocodile conflicts.

Members of the public are reminded to notify the nearest SFC or Sarawak Forest Department offices of any Crocodile sightings in their areas and not take matters into their own hands as these reptiles are dangerous.

Source: The Borneo Post

Photos: Kami Boikot Buletin Utama TV3 Facebook, Saharudin Rahman Facebook, and Sarawak Voice

Malaysia: SFC captures killer croc in Pusa, finds human remains
By Adib Povera, 19th October 2017;

The Sarawak Forestry Corporation (SFC) has captured and killed a five-metre long Estuarine Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) that is believed to have devoured a villager in Pusa, near Sibu.

Following the disappearance of Bentayan Ilah, SFC on Wednesday evening deployed its Swift Wildlife Action Team (SWAT) to Sungai Rimbas in Pusa to capture the animal.

“The team, comprising officers from Kuching and Sibu, installed 13 baited hooks along the five-kilometre stretch of the river to lure the Crocodile.

"It was only recently (Tuesday evening) that our team managed to take down the 4.8-metre long Crocodile,” said SFC in a statement today.

It added that a post-mortem was conducted on the reptile in the presence of policemen and members of the victim’s family this morning.

“We found body parts in the crocodile’s abdomen. The body parts have been handed over the police for forensic DNA analysis.”

It was reported that Bentayan, together with a friend, had gone fishing at Sungai Rimbas last month.

During the incident on Sept 24, the victim, from Kampung Tambak, was believed to have been attacked and dragged into the river by the Crocodile.

In two other separate cases, SFC said its SWAT unit culled two Crocodiles measuring 3.8 and 3.9 metres, respectively. The crocs were captured at Sungai Kawi in Bintangor and Suai in Miri, respectively.

Source: New Straits Times

Photo: Sarawak Forestry Corporation

Malaysia: 2.5 metre long male Sarawak River Crocodile meets its end
17th July 2017;

The Swift Wildlife Action Team (SWAT) of the Sarawak Forestry Corporation (SFC) yesterday put an end to a 2.5-metre long male Estuarine Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) from the Sarawak River here, under its crocodile culling and removal programme.

SFC in a statement here yesterday said the SWAT operation in the major waterway that began last Tuesday, ended yesterday with the catch.

“The operation covered a three-kilometre stretch, with seven separate sets of ‘hook-and-line’ installed. The Crocodile snared at the Sarawak River Barrage at 6am this morning is estimated to weigh 70kgs and it was hauled ashore at 11am,” it said.

The Sarawak River is listed as a location of one of the 19 Crocodile Removal Zones (CRZ), whereby the presence of Crocodiles in these areas pose serious human-crocodile conflicts.

Source: The Borneo Post

Malaysia: WWF: Culling of bull Elephant a step backwards for conservation
By Ruben Sario, 22nd November 2016;

The Sabah Wildlife Department’s move to cull a bull Borneo Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) that had killed a plantation worker is a “step backwards” in conservation efforts of the endangered species, WWF Malaysia said.

WWF Malaysia executive director Datuk Dr Dionysius Sharma said other options are available in dealing with the male Elephant.

In a statement Tuesday, he said that while there is no “one size fits all solution” to the complex human-Elephant conflict, some possible mitigating measures include the use of electric fences at strategic locations.

Dr Sharma said setting up forest corridors between tracts of jungles will also help reduce the conflict.

“It is hoped that the recent culling will not be a precedent for human-Elephant conflict cases in the future,” he said.

“Borneo Elephants are mostly found in Sabah and their population has dwindled over the years due to habitat loss and such conflicts. Therefore, the death of one member is a huge blow to the whole population,” Dr Sharma added.

He noted that the department had confirmed that the culled bull Elephant was in musth, a period when the males are known to exhibit aggressive behaviour, and consequently are susceptible to provocation.

“Therefore, those working or living in areas inhabited by Elephants need to remain alert of their surroundings, particularly during dawn and after 3pm when elephants are known to be more active,” Dr Sharma added.

“When confronting Elephants, restraint must be practised and retribution avoided, as killing Elephants merely addresses the symptoms of a problem,” he said.

Dr Sharma said unsustainable land use planning in Sabah is also partly to blame for human-Elephant conflict.

He said WWF-Malaysia is working with the wildlife and forestry departments as well as plantation companies on joint mitigation options to reduce conflicts via the Kalabakan human-Elephant conflict working group in Tawau.

Wildlife department director Augustine Tuuga said the bull Elephant was shot and killed late Sunday, a day after it trampled an Indonesian national to death on Nov 19.

Source: The Star

Photo: INFO Sarawak Facebook

Malaysia: Suspected 2.8 metre killer Crocodile culled in Sg Oya
22nd November 2016;

The Sarawak Forestry Corporation (SFC) Swift Wildlife Action Team (SWAT) snared a 2.8-metre-long adult Estuarine Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) from the waters of Sungai Oya near Mukah yesterday.

SFC in a statement yesterday said SWAT members from SFC headquarters assisted by Sibu Regional Office personnel were dispatched to Kampung Bakong, Oya earlier last week to hunt down the Crocodile which attacked and killed Sili Ismail@Esmail, 60, on Nov 11.

“The team commenced culling operations on Nov 18, 13 baited hooks were placed at locations along the river where Sili was attacked. A male Crocodile weighing about 200 kg was hooked just 100 metres from the site where the victim was attacked,” an SFC spokesperson said.

The statement also noted that the operation covered a 5km radius area from the site of the attack.

“With the successful culling of the adult Crocodile deemed capable of the attack, the operation at Sungai Oya was called off yesterday (Sunday).”>/p>

SFC also took the opportunity to extend its gratitude to all parties involved particularly the police and villagers for assistance rendered during the operation.

The spokesperson also reminded the public to be vigilant at all times when using the river.

Source: The Borneo Post

The Elephant was culled by Sabah Wildlife Department rangers after it killed a man in Tawau.

Malaysia: Bull Elephant that killed man in Sabah culled
By Ruben Sario, 21st November 2016;

A bull Borneo Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) that killed a man at a timber plantation in the east coast Tawau district has been culled by Sabah Wildlife Department rangers.

Department director Augustine Tuuga said the male Elephant was shot and killed late Sunday, a day after it trampled the Indonesian national to death on Nov 19.

He said the rangers had tracked down the bull Elephant and determined that there was a likelihood of the animal attacking humans again.

“We did not want to take any chances with this bull as it had already killed a human,” said Augustine.

“There was a real possibility that this bull Elephant would attack again if it came across anyone in its path,” he added.

He said the bull Elephant had been in musth – a periodic state of heightened sexual activity and aggression in adult male pachyderms.

Musth is caused by a marked increase of testosterone in the animal, resulting in the bull Elephant’s very violent behaviour, Augustine explained.

“I have directed my officers in the east coast region to be on high alert to monitor the movements of the Elephant herds within their ranges and evaluate the behaviour of other Elephants in the herd as well,” he added.

State Tourism, Culture and Environment Minister Datuk Seri Masidi Manjun said the decision to cull the bull Elephant was a difficult one.

“We did it with great reluctance but human lives are paramount,” he added.

Source: The Star