This beautiful adult female Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) will no longer be a part in her species’ survival. She died yesterday due to compacted intestines full of plastic bags. Congratulations humans, killing without even trying.

Source: Darrell Blatchley Facebook

This adult female Green Turtle died last 21 October in Davao due to compacted intestines full of plastic bags.

Source: Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

Philippines: Endangered Green Sea Turtle dies from plastic ingestion
23rd October 2016;

A Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) that ingested plastic garbage died Saturday in Davao City due to infection.

Citing an environmental NGO, GMA News stringer Peewee Bacuño said the sickly Sea Turtle was washed ashore on Friday in Davao City’s Barangay 78.

Fishermen brought it to the NGO office where the Turtle was examined.

Darrel Blatchley, the NGO’s president, said the Turtle grew weak after ingesting over 10 types of plastic materials floating in the sea.

Blatchley said the Green Turtle species in the Sea Turtle family is already endangered.

Source: GMA News Online

WHALE CARCASS – Marine mammal expert Darrel Blatchley goes through the remains of a beached Whale that was found in Kadatu Beach, Pag-ibig Village in Barangay Dumoy, Davao City last Sunday.
Photo: Yas D. Ocampo

Philippines: Lego bricks, metal strands may have choked beached Whale in Davao
By Yas D. Ocampo, 3rd October 2016;

Interlocking plastic bricks, more popularly known as Lego, and strands of metal may have caused the death of a Short-finned Pilot Whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) which was found on a beach on the southern part of Davao City Sunday.

Darrel Blatchley, an expert in marine mammal beaching, told reporters Monday that an initial autopsy of the Whale showed that it had ingested the foreign materials, which may have been floating in the Davao Gulf.

The beached Whale was found in Kadatu Beach, Pag-ibig Village in Barangay Dumoy here.

Blatchley, the American curator of D’Bone Collector Museum here, said the Whale that was found dead Sunday was the third to have been beached in the area.

Blatchley said that the Whale may have been dead for a week before ending up along the coast of Davao City.

When Blatchley’s team arrived on the scene last Sunday, the whale was already in a state of decomposition, which led the team to conduct an autopsy on the spot.

Its tail had also been cut off, but Blatchley said that this could have happened along the Davao Gulf.

According to Blatchley, the Whale may have died of starvation of dehydration.

The Whale weighed at least 400 kilograms and would have been at least 13 feet long, Blatchley said.

Some of the Whale’s teeth were also gone that led Blatchley to surmise that these were plucked by curious locals or beachgoers who were after souvenirs.

Possession of any part of protected creatures is prohibited by law.

The bones of the marine mammal were immediately picked up by the Bone Museum, which displays bones of various animals found in different parts of the Philippines in a privately-run facility in this city.

Source: Manila Bulletin

Philippine Eagle Foundation personnel treat the wound suffered by Philippine Eagle Matatag, who was shot by a farmer a year after the Eagle was released to the wild.
Photo: Philippine Eagle Foundation

Philippines: Shooting shows danger still lurks for endangered Eagle
By Joselle R. Badilla, 26th February 2016;

Matatag, the rehabilitated Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) that was released to the wild last year, was wounded when shot by a farmer in a hinterland village in Baguio District here on Sunday.

The adult male Eagle was released in Mt. Apo last year. It moved 13 kilometers north from his release area to the territorial borders of the Obu Manuvu community in Barangay Carmen here.

On Sunday, however, a farmer brought the wounded Eagle to the Philippine Eagle Center in Malagos, admitting that he shot it with a .22-cal. rifle.

The farmer, Tiburcio Aparesio, 24, said he accidentally shot the bird and brought it to the center after realizing it was an Eagle.

Dr. Anna Lascano, the center’s veterinarian, said the Eagle was wounded in the right wing.

Chief Insp. Leonardo Pamplona, Baguio District police precinct commander, said the center called the precinct about the Eagle being shot and the perpetrator bringing the Eagle to center.

Pamplona said police brought Aparesio to the precinct but on Monday, Aparesio’s younger brother, Rolando, claimed responsibility.

He said the brothers are detained at the precinct for violating Republic Act No. 9147, also known as the Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act.

But the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) said a witness supported Rolando’s claim that it was he who shot the Eagle.

Matatag is still under observation, but appears to be responding well to medication, Lascano said.

A weak Matatag spent at least three years in rehabilitation at the center after it was turned over in 2011.

It was released more than a year ago to forests being claimed as ancestral land of the Obu Manuvu tribe.

Dennis Salvador, PEF executive director, said Matatag’s case underscores the continuing decline in population of the endangered Philippine Eagle even in supposedly protected areas.

Salvador called on people to be more involved in the protection of Philippine raptors.

“We cannot be complacent,” he said.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

Philippines: Philippine Eagle ‘Matatag’ shot in Tambobong
26th February 2016;

Matatag is back at the Philippine Eagle Center after being shot in Brgy. Tambobong, Baguio District, Davao City last February 21, Sunday, at around 8:00 AM by a resident of the said barangay.

Tiborcio Solis Aparesio, brought the wounded Eagle to the Philippine Eagle Center (PEC) and claimed responsibility for the shooting and said that he used a .22 caliber rifle. The Eagle’s identity was verified by Joshua Donato, Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) Senior Field Biologist, when he checked the bird’s leg band. Resident veterinarian, Dr. Anna Lascano immediately treated Matatag.

Initial results show that Matatag fractured his right wing. Scattered pieces of bones and shrapnel were seen in the x-ray.

The incident was later reported to the patrolling police officers of Police Station 11 onboard at the Davao City Water District compound. The PEF staff also turned over the suspect to PO3 Kent R. Lahorra.

But the following day, the suspect’s brother, Rolando Solis Aparesio, went to the Baguio Police Station and claimed that he was the one who shot Matatag and not his brother. A witness supported the claim and added that it was really Rolando who shot the Eagle and Tiburcio was only covering up to his brother.

Donato, as the complainant, filed a case of violation of RA 9147 or the Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act for causing injuries to Matatag against the Aparesio brothers. They are currently under the custody of the police. Meanwhile, Matatag is still under observation but appears to be responding well to medication.

Matatag was released back to the ancestral forests of the indigenous Obo Manuvu tribe over a year ago after 3 years of rehabilitation of the Philippine Eagle Center.

PEF Executive Director Dennis Salvador said that this incident only underscores the continuing decline in population of the endangered Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) even in the most protected territories.

Ultimately, Salvador calls on Filipinos to be more involved in the protection of Philippine raptors. He adds that we cannot be complacent—that the protection of our national bird cannot be left to our forest guards but should be the responsibility of everyone.

Source: Philippine Eagle Foundation

Philippines: Philippine Eagle ‘Matatag’ survives third shooting

By Edith Regalado, 26th February 2016;

Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) Matatag is proving to be true to its name as it recovers from a .22-caliber bullet wound it suffered last Sunday in Barangay Tambobong, Baguio District here.

Tiborcio Aparesio, who claimed responsibility for the incident, brought the wounded giant raptor to the Malagos Eagle Center for treatment. But, on Monday, his claim was belied by his brother Rolando, who also said he was the one who shot the Eagle.

Depending on how the word matatag is used, it could mean to stand firm, to be stable, steadfast or dependable.

Matatag was first brought to the Philippine Eagle Center in Barangay Malagos, Calinan District for rehabilitation four years ago. He was only about a year old then.

Experts then diagnosed Matatag as having anemia and described him as thin, nearly all of his flight feathers gone and in a “pitifully sickly state.”

He recuperated and rehabilitated for three years before he was released back to the wild on Dec. 15, 2014 at the ancestral forest of the indigenous Obu Manuvu tribe here.

The giant raptor was fitted with a radio VHF transmitter for tracking purposes and was observed to have been doing well in the wild until last Sunday when he was brought back to the center.

Carlos Dominguez, Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) chairman, said Matatag is responding well to medication but was alarmed with what happened.

He stressed that there are now only less than 500 pairs of Philippine Eagles, including the 34 kept at the Malagos center and those sighted in the wild in the forests of Mindanao, Samar, Leyte and the Cordilleras.

PEF executive director Dennis Salvador said the incident underscores the continuing decline in the endangered Eagle population even in the most protected territories.

He called on Filipinos to be more involved in the protection of Philippine raptors, saying, “We cannot be complacent – that the protection of our national bird cannot be left to our forest guards but should be the responsibility of everyone.”

Joshua Donato, PEF senior field biologist, established the raptor’s identity after checking on the bird’s leg band while resident veterinarian Anna Lascano immediately performed treatment.

It appeared that Matatag fractured his right wing after the x-ray showed scattered pieces of bones and shrapnel.

Donato charged the Aparesio brothers, who are detained at the Baguio police station, for violating Republic Act 9147 or the Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act.

Source: The Philippine Star

Philippines: Philippine Eagle ‘Matatag’ survives third shooting

ENDANGERED – A veterinarian administers medicine on ‘Matatag,’ the Philippine Eagle which was shot in the wild last Sunday.
Photo: Philippine Eagle Foundation

Philippines: Brothers surrender after shooting ‘Matatag’
By Jonathan A. Santes, 24th February 2016;

Two brothers were jailed for shooting an endangered Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) named “Matatag” last Sunday in Barangay Tambobong, Baguio District, Davao City.

Police identified them as Tiburcio, 24, and Rolando Aparesio 18, both residents of Sitio Mangas of the same district.

The two voluntarily surrendered to Bagiuo Police Station last Monday after a witness pinpointed them as the ones who shot and wounded Matatag, a captive Eagle that was released to the wild by the Philippine Eagle Foundation sometime January 2015.

Police report gathered by Manila Bulletin said Tiburcio immediately brought the wounded Eagle to the Philippine Eagle Foundation in Malagos, Calinan where it is now being cared for.

Baguio Police Station commander Leonardo Pamplona said Tiburcio mistook Matatag as the one preying on their farm chickens, and when he saw the Eagle in their vicinity, he shot it using a .22-caliber rifle and hit the Eagle’s wing.

The Philippine Eagle has a wing span of up to two meters and is also known as one of the three largest and most powerful Eagles in the world.

The bird was declared as protected in the Philippines under Republic act 6147 promulgated by the Philippine government in 1970.

It carries a penalty of imprisonment up to 12 years and a fine amounting to P1million.

Source: Manila Bulletin