An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 6 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 5 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 4 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 3 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 2 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 1 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

Philippines: BFAR: Tons of dead fish, marine animals washed ashore in Leyte

12th December 2015;

Tons of different types of fishes and marine animals were washed ashore on Wednesday along the coast of Barangay Bacong, Babatngon, Leyte, a television report said Saturday.

Citing information from the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, a report on “News TV Live” said residents were surprised to see hundreds of dead fish floating near shore during high tide.

Local BFAR officials said some three tons of fish and other aquatic animals have been washed ashore.

The BFAR also said residents had reported that a cargo ship has been docked at nearby oil depot since December 7, and that it is conducting an investigation on what caused the fish mortality.

Source: GMA News Online

Philippines: BFAR: Tons of dead fish, marine animals washed ashore in Leyte

Philippines: BFAR probes fish kill; to file raps vs ship owner for dumping waste

11th December 2015;

The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) will file a case against the owner of the unnamed ship for dumping highly toxic chemicals to the sea that killed more than a ton of marine products in Babatngon, Leyte.

Citing initial investigation, BFAR Regional Director Juan D. Albaladejo blamed the ballast waste released by the unnamed vessel on Monday as the main cause of the fish kill.

“Our team has been gathering all data in preparation for the formal filing of case against the ship operator for violating Republic Act 10654,” Albaladejo said in a mobile phone interview.

The fish kill has stopped Tuesday afternoon, but until now BFAR is still clueless on the name of the vessel that dumped the waste on Monday.

BFAR is coordinating with the Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) to identify the vessel. Among all government agencies, only EMB has the access to the oil depot in Bacong village, Babatngon town.

“Our assumption is that after the crew unloaded the oil, they cleaned up the tanks using chemicals and dumped the waste to the sea. The waste is highly toxic since it killed even bottom-dweller species such as blue crab (F. Portunidae), stingrays (F. Dasyatidae) and octopus (F. Octopodidae) within 24 hours,” the official explained.

Fish appeared sluggish, surfacing from water and dying with gaping mouth, according to Albaladejo.

BFAR also dismissed claims that the fish kill is caused by red tide bloom in Carigara Bay since toxicity level in Babatngon town is very low.

Source: Philippines News Agency

Philippines: BFAR probes fish kill; to file raps vs ship owner for dumping waste

Indonesia: Chemical spill kills fish in Leyte town

10th December 2015;

Chemical spill from ballast waste discharged by an unnamed vessel has killed fish in Babatngon town in Leyte, the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) said Wednesday.

The fisheries bureau has sent teams to find out more details on the reported chemical spill and get the identity of the vessel that docked at the oil depot in Bacong village, Babatngon town. The vessel reportedly arrived on Sunday and left Tuesday afternoon.

Citing reports from local fishermen, BFAR Regional Director Juan Albaladejo said in a mobile phone interview that in the coastal subvillage of Nabungcagan, at least 300 kilograms of assorted marine products were found dead.

In the nearby Tulaan subvillage, 450 kilograms have been affected by the spill.

“Assorted species were affected including bottom dwellers such as blue swimming crab (F. Portunidae), octopus (F. Octopodidae), stingray (F. Dasyatidae), suggesting chemical spill,” Albaladejo told PNA.

The fish kill has started on Monday and has been spreading to nearby areas until Wednesday noon, according to BFAR.

“Fish appeared sluggish, surfacing from water and dying with gaping mouth. No obvious lesions were seen from body surface,” Albaladejo explained.

The fisheries bureau got the report about the chemical spill on Tuesday from the Office of the Civil Defense.

The BFAR official said that this is not the first time a fish kill hit the coastal area of Babatngon due to oil or chemical spill. The recent incident prompted authorities to look into environmental laws violations of the oil depot.

Babatngon town is about 31 kilometers northwest from Tacloban City.

Source: InterAksyon

Indonesia: Chemical spill kills fish in Leyte town

This Oarfish (Regalecus sp.) was found on the shores of Barangay Anislagon, San Francisco, Southern Leyte yesterday.

Source: Kriesi Sy Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook