Photos: Liputan6, Okezone, Kompas

Indonesia: Giant man-sized Amazonian fish washes up on Ciliwung River in Bogor
30th November 2015;

Yesterday, citizens in Bogor were shocked to find an enormous dead fish, as large as a full-grown man, washed up on the banks of the Ciliwung River under the Jalan Baru Bridge in North Bogor.

The fish was identified as an Arapaima (Araipama gigas), native to the Amazon rainforests.

No, the fish didn’t swim half the world to end up in the Ciliwung. It was later revealed that the fish lived in an aquarium in Sumber Karya Indah (SKI) tourism attraction in Tajur, Bogor, and had only recently died.

“Yesterday (Saturday), a fish died at around 7:30AM,” said SKI informations officer M Sholeh, as quoted by Kompas on Sunday.

Sholeh added that they haven’t determined the fish’s cause of death.

Because of the lack of burial rites for fish – however magnificent they may be – the dead Araipama was simply tossed into the river, presumably to become fish food.

Fate would have it that the dead fish resurfaced in Bogor for a final send off. It was reported that it took seven adult males to lift the fish and toss it back into the river.

We certainly hope it doesn’t wash up anywhere else downstream so it can rest peacefully in its watery grave.

Source: Coconuts Jakarta

Philippines: Serpent Eagle rescued in Zamboanga City

By RJ Rosalado, 25th August 2015;

A Philippine Serpent Eagle (Spilornis holospilus) was rescued by residents in Barangay Ayala, Zamboanga City on Sunday morning.

The Eagle was found by residents near the vicinity of Zamboanga City Police Station 9. It appeared weak and could hardly spread its wings.

Residents sought the assistance of the policemen, who then called the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR).

Ben Acana, head of the Community Environment and Natural Resources Office, said the Serpent Eagle is about 2 to 3 months old. He suspects the Eagle was domesticated by a local resident near the area where it was found.

Acana said based on their initial observations, the Serpent Eagle found it difficult to adjust to the wild.

The Serpent Eagle was brought to the DENR’s wildlife rescue center for observation.

The Eagle will be released in the wild as soon as its condition permits.

Based on Republic Act 9147 or the Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act, killing, catching and transporting any wildlife animals are prohibited and punishable.

Source: ABS-CBN News

Philippines: Serpent Eagle rescued in Zamboanga City

Pig-nosed Turtle (Carettochelys insculpta)
Tampines Quarry, 20th July 2014

These skeletal remains of a Pig-nosed Turtle most likely belonged to an illegal pet that was subsequently abandoned in the lake at the quarry.

This find has been documented in the Singapore Biodiversity Records: Skeletal remains of a Pig-nosed Turtle in Tampines Quarry.

Fig. 1. Ventral view of the turtle carcass as seen on 30 July 2014 at around 1125 hrs.
Fig. 2. By 31 July 2014 at around 1130 hrs, the head, limbs, and tail had disappeared, presumably removed by scavengers.
Photographs by Yap Xinli and Ivan W.M. Kwan

Carcass of Snapping Turtle (Chelydra sp.) at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Location, date and time: Singapore Island, Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve; 30 July 2014 at around 1125 hrs & 31 July 2014 at around 1130 hrs.

Observation: The decomposing carcass of a turtle about 45 cm carapace length was first spotted on 30 July 2014 (Fig 1.). The next day, its head, limbs, and tail were found missing (Fig. 2), presumably taken by scavengers.

Remarks: The carapace and several other bones were recovered and will be deposited in the Zoological Reference Collection (ZRC) of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum at the National University of Singapore.

This is the first record of a Snapping Turtle from northwestern Singapore. An example, identified as Chelydra serpentina, was seen and photographed in MacRitchie Reservoir in 2009 (Ng & Lim, 2010). Free-ranging Snapping Turtles in Singapore are most likely abandoned pets that were illegally imported.

The Snapping Turtles of the genus Chelydra are native to the Americas, with 3 species: Chelydra serpentina from North America, Chelydra rossignonii from Mexico and northern Central America, and Chelydra acutirostris from southern Central America and northwestern South America. The latter two, formerly subspecies of Chelydra serpentina, were elevated to species level (Fritz and Havaš, 2007) based on genetic studies by Phillips et al. (1996). It is not known which species of Snapping Turtle this carcass belongs to.

References:

  • Fritz, U. & P. Havaš, 2007. Checklist of chelonians of the world. Vertebrate Zoology. 57 (2): 149–368.
  • Phillipps, C. A., W. W. Dimmick & J. L. Carr, 1996. Conservation genetics of the Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina). Conservation Biology. 10 (2): 397–405.
  • Ng T. H. & K. K. P. Lim, 2010. Introduced aquatic herpetofauna of Singapore’s reservoirs. COSMOS. 6 (1): 117–127.

Source: Singapore Biodiversity Records 2015: 97-98

Fig. 1. Disarticulated skeletal remains of a Pig-nosed Turtle in the water of the quarry lake.
Fig. 2. Skeletal elements of the Pig-nosed Turtle brought onto land.
Fig. 3. Lateral view of the turtle’s cranium with snout pointing to the left.
Photographs by Ivan W.M. Kwan

Skeletal remains of a Pig-nosed Turtle (Carettochelys insculpta) in Tampines Quarry

Location, date and time: Singapore Island, Tampines Quarry; 20 July 2014; 2000 hrs.

Observation: The disarticulated skeleton of a pig-nosed turtle, comprising the skull (without the mandible), fragments of the carapace, and a few limb bones, was found submerged among rocks in the shallow edge of the lake.

Remarks: The cranium, about 8 cm in length, was recovered and will be deposited in the Zoological Reference Collection (ZRC) of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum at the National University of Singapore.

The Pig-nosed Turtle is native to inland waterways of southern New Guinea and the Northern Territory in Australia (Burgess & Lilly, 2014). This species was illegally imported in large numbers and widely available in pet shops in Singapore up until the early 2000s (Goh & O’Riordan, 2007). Free-ranging examples in Singapore are most likely abandoned pets. Ng & Lim (2010) recorded a carcass at MacRitchie Reservoir, and the contributor has observed one in the Eco-Lake at the Singapore Botanic Gardens in October 2013.

References:

  • Burgess, E. A. & R. Lilly, 2014. Assessing the Trade in Pig-nosed Turtles Carettochelys insculpta in Papua, Indonesia. TRAFFIC Southeast Asia, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. 40 pp.
  • Goh T. Y. & R. M. O’Riordan, 2007. Are tortoises and freshwater turtles still traded illegally as pets in Singapore? Oryx. 41 (1): 97–100.
  • Ng T. H. & K. K. P. Lim, 2010. Introduced aquatic herpetofauna of Singapore’s reservoirs. COSMOS. 6 (1): 117–127.

Source: Singapore Biodiversity Records 2015: 95-96