Dead turtle found trapped in fishing nets along East Coast Park

By Tanya Ong, 1st June 2018;

A turtle was found dead and trapped in fishing nets along East Coast Park.

Trapped in fishing nets

It was discovered by wildlife lover Sidi Baker on May 21 at about 4pm.

He noticed the large net in the sea and realised there was a dead turtle trapped inside when he removed the net from the water.

He took to Facebook to share several photos of the turtle, hoping to “create awareness on what’s going in and at our waters and beaches”.

33027140_10209499528520141_6128429151796854784_n33023076_10209499529200158_2778303258748256256_n32939016_10209499530040179_4927084386303606784_nHe also said that he cleared the net and buried the turtle.

This is his full post.

Wildlife harmed

Baker told Mothership.sg that he helps to remove nets or rubbish at the beach as “it might harm sea creatures.”

He also throws away unwanted hooks and lines.

In Singapore, where animal and human habitats overlap, there have been multiple instances of wildlife being hurt as a result of human activity.

Previously, an otter at Pasir Ris Park was found with a rubber ring around it, and a monitor lizard was seen entangled in a plastic bag along the Singapore River.

Source: Mothership.sg

Turtle found in Yishun with fish hook in its mouth, dies from wound

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The Turtle succumbed to its injuries after it was found by a passer-by in Yishun Avenue 1.

Lydia Lam, 6th January 2018;

A Turtle that was found in Yishun with a fish hook in its mouth was taken to the Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Acres) to be treated, but it died that same day.

Acres highlighted the incident, which happened on Dec 22, in a Facebook post on Friday (Jan 5).

Acres deputy chief executive Anbarasi Boopal told The Straits Times on Saturday that a passer-by had found the turtle in Yishun Avenue 1 in the wee hours of Dec 22.

“The call came in at 2am. The caller said there was a nail sticking out of its mouth, and we realised it was a fish hook. It was taken to Acres and our vet removed the hook, however, the Turtle died that same evening,” she said.

The turtle was an Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtle (Amyda cartilaginea), native to Singapore. They live in freshwater streams, rivers or in reservoirs. However, it is unclear where this particular turtle came from.

“There are a few possibilities. It could be a native turtle from nearby Seletar Reservoir, or it could have been a released or abandoned turtle,” said Ms Boopal. “People think they are doing good by releasing them into the sea or a water body, but they might die as they are just suddenly left in an unfamiliar environment.”

Ms Boopal said the animal rescue group “increasingly sees a lot of wildlife affected by fish hooks, like Monitor Lizards, Snakes and a lot of Turtles”.

“We have rescued quite a few Red-eared Terrapins (Trachemys scripta elegans) with fish hooks in their mouths, even Box Turtles (Cuora amboinensis),” she said.

She advised members of the public who come across wounded Turtles or animals to call Acres at its hotline 9783-7782.

Callers should provide photos if possible and seek advice on what further actions to take. Some Turtles may bite, particularly if in pain.

Source: The Straits Times

Malaysia: Crocs spotted in Senadin housing drain

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The Crocodile that was found dead in the net.

By Jenifer Laeng, 6th January 2018;

Several residents in Senadin Phase 3, jittery after they spotted a few Crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) in the big drain at the back of their houses recently, are hoping that authorities could do something before anything untoward happens.

According to one of the house owners, she had been living here for years and the sight of the reptiles, believed to be the young ones, had becoming more frequent lately.

“In fact, one was found in the net by my brother-in-law on Thursday. He initially thought that it was not Crocodile, but when we had a close look at it, we knew it was a Crocodile,” she said when contacted today.

The woman, who requested anonymity, said her brother-in-law was surprised when he went to check on his fishing net on Thursday and found the reptile in it.

“The reptile measuring at about two feet in length was however dead when it was found so he got rid of it,” she said.

She added that the drain behind their house was quite big, and she believed there are more of the reptiles in the area.

“There has been no cases of croc attack here in the past, so we are hopeful that the authorities can do something about it to avoid any untoward incident,” she said.

Source: The Borneo Post

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AN UNDESIRED FATALITY

Imagine the worst sore throat you ever endured, or a large fish bone stuck in your throat. Poor Monsty barely endured the fishing hook wedged in her mouth, and it must have painful and excruciatingly uncomfortable for her. Sadly, she succumbed to her injuries.

The Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles (Amyda cartilaginea) are a native species, but Singapore also imports several thousands of wild-caught Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles annually for turtle soup.

You can help wild animals by not buying them from markets or contributing to mercy releases, because it only fuels the demand for the species. Help dispose fishing lines, nets and hooks that may be littered around our environment.

Source: Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Singapore) (ACRES) Facebook

Malaysia: Endangered Sea Turtles caught in fishing net saved by fishermen

27th October 2017;

Fishing nets are a threat to the marine ecosystem, which is proven yet again when a group of local fishermen recently saved four Sea Turtles and ending their week of misery of being caught in the fishing nets.

As reported by Kosmo!, the group stumbled upon the distressing scene at roughly 9am on Wednesday (Oct 25) with one of the four endangered marine reptiles in a fragile state as one of its hind legs was almost cut off while its abdomen was bloated.

The captain of the crew, Wan Abdul Halim Wan Mohamed Dom, recounted that they found the trawling net, which entrapped the found Sea Turtles, at 22 nautical miles from the Kuala Kerteh Fisheries Jetty and are convinced that it may have belonged to foreign fishermen.

The 43-year-old went on to elaborate that he along with his three-man crew were on their way to their fishing spot to collect the fish that have been caught, when they came across the foreign trawling net.

“We found a trawling net that was 200 metres long and 10 metres wide. After we pulled it out and cut it open, we found two Green Sea Turtles (Chelonia mydas) and two Hawksbill Sea Turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata),” the captain revealed to Kosmo! yesterday.

While Wan Abdul Halim shared that three of the Sea Turtles have been released to the sea, the severely injured turtle was taken back to the Kuala Kerteh Fisheries Jetty for treatment purposes.

He conveyed to the Malay daily that the Persatuan Khazanah Rakyat Ma’ Daerah (MEKAR) Kerteh has been informed of the discovery of the injured Hawksbill Turtle, prior handing it over to the Turtles and Marine Ecosystem Centre (TUMEC) in Rantau Abang yesterday.

Meanwhile, Fisheries Research Institute Officer Mohd Tamimi Ali Ahmad communicated that initial inspection revealed that the Hawksbill Turtle was severely injured and therefore, preventing it to swim normally.

“Based on its physical condition, it’s believed that the Hawksbill Turtle was trapped in the drift nets for a long period of time.

"The aquatic reptile is estimated to be between four and six years old and will be treated until it is fully recovered prior releasing it back to the ocean,” he affirmed.

Mohd Tamimi also underlined that the drift nets are believed to have belonged to foreign fishermen, who invaded Malaysian waters as the Department of Fisheries has banned the total use of trawling nets.

Sinar Harian reported that the officer revealed that many Sea Turtles have swam towards the middle of the sea following Vietnamese fishermen illegally harvesting marine produce mostly in the vicinity of Pulau Tenggol.

“Their illegal actions are damaging the coral reefs, which happens to be the primary ecosystem for Sea Turtles,” he lamented.

“I’m proud of the immediate action taken by our local fishermen to rescue the endangered Sea Turtles, that are protected under the Fisheries Act 1985,” he applauded.

Wan Abdul Halim on the other hand expressed his hope that enforcement measures will continue to improve as a means to ensure that foreign fishermen will not continue to threat out marine ecosystem.

Source: Malaysian Digest

Malaysia: Endangered Sea Turtles caught in fishing net saved by fishermen

Pak Atan (right) and his family members could not hold back their tears as they held the dead body of Si Tenang, the baby dugong, back in 1999.

Malaysia: Si Tenang, the little Dugong that stole our hearts
By Andrew Sia, 24th June 2017;

The case of Si Tenang the baby Dugong (Dugong dugon) captured national attention in 1999.

Atan Hussin (Pak Atan), a fisherman in southern Johor, had accidentally caught a baby Dugong in his net. Finding that it had been bruised, he decided to take care of it at his kelong (a floating raft house with nets). He and his family grew fonder of this baby marine mammal and named it Si Tenang.

However, within two weeks, the authorities asked him to release the Dugong into the wild. Pak Atan did so, but he kept looking out for Si Tenang, hoping that it would come back to visit him.

But within 48 hours, he was heartbroken when Si Tenang was found dead after it had been tangled up in other nets (Dugongs are mammals that need to regularly surface to breathe).

The public should know that Dugongs are facing many threats that may lead to their extinction, underlined Dr Leela Rajamani, a dugong specialist from Universiti Sains Malaysia.

In Johor, the main problems are rapid coastal development, accidental entanglement in nets, boat collisions, and destructive fishing methods (such as trawling and rawai longlines full of hooks). In Sabah, Leela said there is the added problem of fish bombing.

Seagrass specialist Dr Jillian Ooi of Universiti Malaya said the Dugong is listed as “vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. This means that certain Dugong populations are greatly reduced in size, hurt by human activities, and in danger of local extinction.

On April 21, a Dugong was found dead at Pulau Tinggi near Mersing.

“The Fisheries Department thinks it was probably caught in a longline or rawai because there were hook scars on it,” said Ooi.

Rawai are floating death traps which can stretch for hundreds of metres and have up to 2,000 hooks.

“This type of fishing gear needs to be prohibited because they are so dangerous to marine life. The worst damage occurs when the longline breaks off and floats around in the sea, cruelly hooking anything that lies in its path, including Turtles, Sharks and Dugongs.”

Leela explained that Dugong conservation in Malaysia took off after the Si Tenang incident.

“The Government allocated funds for research on these creatures and on seagrass. Expertise development was also one of the priorities. I benefited from this with an ample research grant and PhD scholarship. The Department of Fisheries has also drafted a Dugong management plan.”

But she noted that much more needs to be done. For starters, more research is needed on seagrass, since this is the main source of food for Dugongs.

“Seagrass has not been properly mapped out except in small areas of Sabah and the eastern islands of Johor. So there is a lack of information for a proper Dugong conservation plan.”

She added that issues remain with the enforcement of existing legislation, for instance, not allowing trawlers to come closer than five nautical miles to marine parks.

“Dugongs are a charismatic, flagship species. They act as an umbrella species to conserve other species in the habitat where they live.”

She stressed the need for education programmes about Dugongs targeted at different audiences such as corporations, rural people (who live close to Dugongs) and city folk.

“I hope that more Malaysians will develop a sense of pride and compassion towards these gentle creatures.”

Source: Star2.com