Daily Decay (23rd March 2018)

Daily Decay (23rd March 2018): Unidentified Prawns (F. Penaeidae) and Tube of Tubeworm (Diopatra sp.) @ Pulau Ubin

These were most likely leftover baits discarded by an angler.

Malaysia: Crocs spotted in Senadin housing drain

myy-bp060118-jls-crocsresidentialarea-p1.jpg
The Crocodile that was found dead in the net.

By Jenifer Laeng, 6th January 2018;

Several residents in Senadin Phase 3, jittery after they spotted a few Crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) in the big drain at the back of their houses recently, are hoping that authorities could do something before anything untoward happens.

According to one of the house owners, she had been living here for years and the sight of the reptiles, believed to be the young ones, had becoming more frequent lately.

“In fact, one was found in the net by my brother-in-law on Thursday. He initially thought that it was not Crocodile, but when we had a close look at it, we knew it was a Crocodile,” she said when contacted today.

The woman, who requested anonymity, said her brother-in-law was surprised when he went to check on his fishing net on Thursday and found the reptile in it.

“The reptile measuring at about two feet in length was however dead when it was found so he got rid of it,” she said.

She added that the drain behind their house was quite big, and she believed there are more of the reptiles in the area.

“There has been no cases of croc attack here in the past, so we are hopeful that the authorities can do something about it to avoid any untoward incident,” she said.

Source: The Borneo Post

Malaysia: Endangered Sea Turtles caught in fishing net saved by fishermen

27th October 2017;

Fishing nets are a threat to the marine ecosystem, which is proven yet again when a group of local fishermen recently saved four Sea Turtles and ending their week of misery of being caught in the fishing nets.

As reported by Kosmo!, the group stumbled upon the distressing scene at roughly 9am on Wednesday (Oct 25) with one of the four endangered marine reptiles in a fragile state as one of its hind legs was almost cut off while its abdomen was bloated.

The captain of the crew, Wan Abdul Halim Wan Mohamed Dom, recounted that they found the trawling net, which entrapped the found Sea Turtles, at 22 nautical miles from the Kuala Kerteh Fisheries Jetty and are convinced that it may have belonged to foreign fishermen.

The 43-year-old went on to elaborate that he along with his three-man crew were on their way to their fishing spot to collect the fish that have been caught, when they came across the foreign trawling net.

“We found a trawling net that was 200 metres long and 10 metres wide. After we pulled it out and cut it open, we found two Green Sea Turtles (Chelonia mydas) and two Hawksbill Sea Turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata),” the captain revealed to Kosmo! yesterday.

While Wan Abdul Halim shared that three of the Sea Turtles have been released to the sea, the severely injured turtle was taken back to the Kuala Kerteh Fisheries Jetty for treatment purposes.

He conveyed to the Malay daily that the Persatuan Khazanah Rakyat Ma’ Daerah (MEKAR) Kerteh has been informed of the discovery of the injured Hawksbill Turtle, prior handing it over to the Turtles and Marine Ecosystem Centre (TUMEC) in Rantau Abang yesterday.

Meanwhile, Fisheries Research Institute Officer Mohd Tamimi Ali Ahmad communicated that initial inspection revealed that the Hawksbill Turtle was severely injured and therefore, preventing it to swim normally.

“Based on its physical condition, it’s believed that the Hawksbill Turtle was trapped in the drift nets for a long period of time.

"The aquatic reptile is estimated to be between four and six years old and will be treated until it is fully recovered prior releasing it back to the ocean,” he affirmed.

Mohd Tamimi also underlined that the drift nets are believed to have belonged to foreign fishermen, who invaded Malaysian waters as the Department of Fisheries has banned the total use of trawling nets.

Sinar Harian reported that the officer revealed that many Sea Turtles have swam towards the middle of the sea following Vietnamese fishermen illegally harvesting marine produce mostly in the vicinity of Pulau Tenggol.

“Their illegal actions are damaging the coral reefs, which happens to be the primary ecosystem for Sea Turtles,” he lamented.

“I’m proud of the immediate action taken by our local fishermen to rescue the endangered Sea Turtles, that are protected under the Fisheries Act 1985,” he applauded.

Wan Abdul Halim on the other hand expressed his hope that enforcement measures will continue to improve as a means to ensure that foreign fishermen will not continue to threat out marine ecosystem.

Source: Malaysian Digest

Malaysia: Endangered Sea Turtles caught in fishing net saved by fishermen

Photo: Kompas.com

Indonesia: Endangered Green Turtle found dead with wounds in Polewali Mandar
14th April 2017;

A Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) was found stranded and dead with wounds all over its body at Mampie Beach in Wonomulyo district, Polewali Mandar regency, West Sulawesi, on Thursday night.

The Green Turtle, which is listed as a protected species, was found by local residents and members of Komunitas Sahabat Penyu (Friends of Turtle Community). The dead reptile reportedly had wounds on its neck and head as well as a damaged shell.

The community’s chairman, Yusri, suspected that the turtle was beaten to death by fishermen as turtles, drawn to fishnets full of fish, are often seen during fishing activities, Yusri said.

“We will encourage all stakeholders, including local residents and the maritime police, to intensify joint patrol to protect Turtles,” Yusri said as quoted by kompas.com.

Yusri and student activists on Turtle protection further conducted an examination of the dead Turtle, including recording the Turtle’s measurements and analyzing its wounds. The dead reptile was buried so that its shell would not be illegally traded.

Friends of Turtle Community members and activists have recently intensified patrol efforts along the shores of Mampie Beach on the evenings to prevent anyone from stealing the endangered species’ eggs, as many Turtles typically lay eggs there in April.

Local residents and the Friends of Turtle Community commonly find large Turtles stranded and dead at Mampie Beach.

Source: Jakarta Post

Photos: Erwin Dumaguit Facebook

Philippines: Man-sized Guitarfish in Leyte dies after its fin was cut off
By TJ Dimacali, 13th March 2017;

A 10-foot-long (3-meter-long) Guitarfish (Rhinobatos Rhynchobatus) sp., known locally as “arado”) washed ashore in Dulag, Leyte, last weekend and may have been a victim of poaching.

According to a report on GMA News TV’s Unang Balita, the fish’s dorsal fin had been torn off, eventually leading to its death despite residents’ best efforts to return it to the sea.

The IUCN lists several species of Guitarfish as endangered due to overfishing for their prized dorsal fins, which are sought-after to make soup and medicine.

It was not clear as of press time whether the Guitarfish in Leyte was a victim of poaching or if it somehow lost its fin in an accident.

Closely related to Rays and Sharks, Guitarfish are bottom feeders that prey mostly on clams, worms, and other small animals on the sea floor.

Source: GMA News Online

The common name “Guitarfish” often refers to species from the family Rhinobatidae (Rhinobatus sp.) and Glaucostegidae (Glaucostegus sp.). The members of the family Rhinidae (or Rhynchobatidae) are typically known as Wedgefishes (Rhynchobatus sp.). Several species of Wedgefishes are known from the tropical Indo-Pacific; based on the external morphology seen in the photos, this is likely to be a White-spotted Wedgefish (Rhynchobatus australiae).

A giant Shovelnose Ray (Rhynchobatus sp.) was found dead along the shores of Brgy. San Miguel, Dulag, Leyte last 9 March.

Source: Rochie Montano Adolfo Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

This is a Wedgefish (Rhynchobatus sp.); several species are known from the Indo-Pacific. Based on the external morphology, this is likely to be a White-spotted Wedgefish (Rhynchobatus australiae). The missing dorsal fins might be an indication that it had been finned.

  1. Rare species: Residents crowd around a Whale Shark caught in a trawl in Selakau waters, Sambas regency, West Kalimantan, on Friday.
  2. Playground: Children sit on the back of a Whale Shark caught in a trawl in Selakau waters, Sambas regency, West Kalimantan, on Friday.

Indonesia: Whale shark dead after being caught up in trawl
By Severianus Endi, 26th February 2017;

A 6-meter Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) weighing more than 1 ton got caught in the trawl of a fisherman in Selakau waters, Sambas regency, West Kalimantan, on Friday. Residents later cut the protected animal up and distributed the pieces.

Officers from Selakau Police and the Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) questioned the fisherman, identified as Gustian, over the incident. He said the animal had accidentally become caught up in a trawl he had put out in waters around 20 kilometers off the shore. When he had discovered the shark in the net, Gustian claimed, it had already been dead.

Gustian, who had been out fishing with his son that day, said they had been unable to release the Whale Shark from the trawl, so he decided to pull it to the pier.

Gustian said he was not aware that Whale Sharks were a protected species. He said he did not know who had ordered the local residents to cut the Shark into pieces and take them home.

Pictures of the Whale Shark went viral on social media, showing local residents, including children, crowded around the carcass of the animal on Selakau Beach.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Indonesia’s West Kalimantan program manager, Albert Tjiu, told The Jakarta Post on Sunday there had been no clear information on whether Selakau waters were the habitat of Whale Sharks. However, he said, a WWF researcher conducting a survey in the area had heard of a similar incident last year.

Source: Jakarta Post