American Bullfrog

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)
Upper Seletar Reservoir Park, 5th May 2017

Asian Toad

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Asian Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus)
Lorong Halus, 29th May 2018

East Asian Ornate Chorus Frog

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

East Asian Ornate Chorus Frog (Microhyla fissipes)
Windsor Nature Park, 9th May 2017

Daily Decay (8th February 2018)

Daily Decay (8th February 2018): Asian Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus) @ Lorong Halus

Asian Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus)
Pasir Ris, 15th April 2017

It is likely that this Asian Toad had been run over by someone on a bicycle or electric scooter, as it was found on the pavement.

Banded Bullfrog (Kaloula pulchra)
Pasir Ris, 29th May 2017

Given that this particular stretch of pavement is heavily used by cyclists, and the somewhat flattened nature of the carcass, it is possible that this particular Banded Bullfrog had been mortally wounded and died after being run over by a bicycle.

American Bullfrog (Rana (Aquarana) catesbeiana)
Tampines Quarry, 11th September 2016

Two juvenile American Bullfrogs were found along the shore of the lake in Tampines Quarry. They were alive when first spotted, but had died by the time they were seen again an hour later. The other individual was featured in an earlier instalment of Daily Decay.

Young, newly metamorphosed American Bullfrogs are widely sold in aquarium shops in Singapore as live food for large predatory fishes, although it’s possible that these juveniles are also purchased to be used as bait for anglers, or are deliberately released by well-meaning people who do not understand the ecological harm that can result from releasing potentially invasive species.

Asian Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus)
Sentosa, 8th March 2016

These photos of a dead Common Asian Toad that appears to have been run over by a passing vehicle were shared by Jan Tan.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue too.

Photograph by Erwin Chan

Striped Keelback (Xenochrophis vittatus) eating Asian Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus)

Location, date and time: Singapore Island, Jalan Bahtera in compound of Sarimbun Scout Camp; 9 December 2014; around 1600 hrs.

Observation: A Striped Keelback of about 70 cm total length was found freshly dead and in the middle of swallowing an Asian Toad. The accompanying picture shows the anterior part of the dead snake with the hind limbs of the toad sticking out of its mouth.

Remarks: The Striped Keelback is an introduced species in Singapore where it inhabits rural and suburban areas. It is known to feed on frogs and small fishes (Baker & Lim, 2012: 114). The present observation confirms that it also eats toads. The cause of the snake’s death is unknown.

References:

  • Baker, N. & K. K. P. Lim, 2012. Wild Animals of Singapore. A Photographic Guide to Mammals, Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes. Updated edition. Draco Publishing & Distribution Pte. Ltd. and Nature Society (Singapore).

Source: Singapore Biodiversity Records 2015: 55

Pellets from Tuas: 1. The Pellets
By Melinda Chan & Chan Yoke Meng, 20th February 2015;

The casting of pellet by certain groups of birds is not too well known– see here for more information. After swallowing their prey, these birds regurgitate the indigestible parts that were compacted in the gizzard in a form of pellets. These pellets collect on the ground below the trees where the birds normally perch. Ornithologists collect and study pellets to get information of what the birds had been eating.

Of late, Melinda Chan had been collecting these pellets while Chan Yoke Meng was busy photographing the Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus) along the tree-lined avenue in Tuas.

The image of the the exposed pellet clearly shows the bleached bone fragments.

Together with the pellets on the ground were carcasses of half-eaten rodents.

Read More

Source: Bird Ecology Study Group