Tentative identifications:

  1. Barramundi (Lates calcarifer)
  2. Goatee Croaker (Dendrophysa russelli)
  3. Bearded Worm Goby (Taenioides cirratus)
  4. Barramundi
  5. Green Chromide (Etroplus suratensis), Toadfish (F. Batrachoididae, Wrasse (F. Labridae)
  6. Decorated Ponyfish (Nuchequula gerreoides)
  7. Green Chromide, Toadfish, Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus)

Reporting from Seletar Dam facing Johor side. Unusually strong pungent smell from the sea got my curiosity as I was riding past this stretch.

Along the shores was a zone of 2 metres with dead horseshoe crabs (F. Limulidae), Mangrove Whipray (Himantura walga), Flower Crab (Portunus pelagicus), Grouper (Epinephelus sp.), Sand Whiting (Sillago sp.), Green Chromide (Etroplus suratensis), Spotted Scat (Scatophagus argus), Barramundi (Lates calcarifer), Toadfish (F. Batrachoididae), shrimps and huge colonies of marine bristleworms (Polychaeta).

Source: Benjamin Li Facebook

(This is Part 3 of a 3-part photo set)

Photograph by Ria Tan

Lagoon Shrimp-goby (Cryptocentrus cyanotaenia) at eastern Johor Straits

Location, date and time: Singapore, eastern Johor Strait at Pulau Sekudu, off the south-eastern corner of Pulau Ubin; 9 May 2004; 0723 hrs.

Observation: An individual of about 12 cm total length was found dead on its side on the sand substrate, in ankle-deep water during morning low tide (see accompanying picture). It was in very fresh condition, and seemed to have expired no more than an hour before. The cause of its death is unknown.

Remarks: The Lagoon Shrimp-goby is easily distinguished from other Cryptocentrus species in Singapore with narrow oblique blue lines on its head and at least 10 narrow blue bands on its body (Larson & Lim, 2005: 84). In Singapore waters, this species is also known from Punggol in the Johor Straits, and Pulau Retan Laut (since reclaimed) and Pulau Hantu in the Singapore Straits (Larson et al., 2008: 147).

References:

  • Larson, H. K. & K. K. P. Lim, 2005. A Guide to Gobies of Singapore. Singapore Science Centre. 164 pp.
  • Larson, H. K., Z. Jaafar & K. K. P. Lim, 2008. An annotated checklist of the gobioid fishes of Singapore. The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. 56 (1): 135-155.

Source: Singapore Biodiversity Records 2014: 334

Philippines: Toxic pollutants among causes of Cavite fish kill

By Ellalyn De Vera, 29th September 2014;

Low dissolved oxygen level and toxic pollutants have caused the fish kills in Rosario, Cavite last week, according to the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR).

The BFAR Quick Response Team and the Fish Health Unit personnel of BFAR-Region IV-A were deployed in Rosario, Cavite last September 25 following a reported incident of fish mortality in Malimango River, a four-kilometer river, which starts in Barangay Bagbag 1 and ends in Barangay Ligtong 1 where it opens to Manila Bay.

The river traverses five barangays in Rosario, Cavite namely; Bagbag 1, Bagbag 2, Ligtong 1, Ligtong 3 and, Ligtong 4.

“The stretch of Malimango river is not an aquaculture-producing area and the fish affected by the mortality were wild stock species of Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), asohos (sand whiting) (Sillago sp.), banak (mullet) (F. Mugilidae) and biya (goby),” BFAR reported.

The loss is estimated at one ton.

“Initial findings indicated that dissolved oxygen (DO) level in all three sampling points—Barangay Bagbag Uno (B), Barangay Ligtong 3 and Barangay Ligtong 4—was below 3-5 mg/L or within the critical level,” it said.

“The water quality test came back with high levels of ammonia-nitrogen, nitrite-nitrogen, and phosphates, beyond acceptable level, in all the sampling sites,” it added.

Ammonia is a chemical compound produced naturally from decomposing organic matter, including plants, animals and animal wastes.

The ammonia in the water samples, however, might have also come from agricultural, domestic and industrial wastes.

Phosphates, meanwhile, are one of the primary nutrient sources for many forms of algae and could come from sources like domestic sewage and runoff from agricultural land, urban areas and green areas.

These chemicals at alarming level have hazardous effects on fish which may result in fish mortality, BFAR added.

BFAR has recommended the necessary management measures during the fish mortality occurrence such as proper disposal of dead fish to ensure that dead fish will not reach the market and prevent the occurrence of sanitary-related diseases.

Source: Manila Bulletin

Philippines: Toxic pollutants among causes of Cavite fish kill

Three species of mudskippers found in Singapore.

The eleven or so species of mudskippers found in Singapore are commonly seen in mangroves and mudflats, as well as in various other coastal habitats. Some smaller species have colonised rocky seawalls and breakwaters along our beaches and coastal lagoons, while others are found in the lower reaches of concrete drains and canals.

These highly specialised fishes flourish in environments where few other conventional fishes can, thanks to various adaptations that enable them to breathe out of water. Many species have special pouches in their gill chambers, enabling them to trap oxygenated water and air bubbles. In this manner, the gills are still able to function while the mudskipper is out of the water. So just like how a scuba diver brings an air tank down into the water, these are fishes that bring water tanks up onto land!

Some mudskippers are also able to gulp air and directly absorb atmospheric oxygen through the lining of the back of the mouth and throat, or even through moist skin.

Not all mudskippers are the same; some are more aquatic and prefer shallow mangrove creeks and pools or mudflats, leaving the water only to escape adverse environmental conditions and search for new bodies of water. Others are more amphibious, preferring the water’s edge and spending most of their time on land. Mudskipper species also differ in their diets, with some feeding mostly on algae, and others being predators of invertebrates such as worms and crustaceans.

Yellow-spotted Mudskipper (Periophthalmus walailakae) (Upper Left): This medium-sized species (up to 12 cm) found in mangrove forests is a carnivore, lunging at small crustaceans and insects.

Blue-spotted Mudskipper (Boleophthalmus boddarti) (Lower Left): This medium-sized (up to 13 cm) species can be abundant along river banks and creeks, and on mudflats on the fringes of mangrove forests. A herbivore, it feeds by wiping its face along the surface of the mud, scraping up benthic algae growing on the mud.

Giant Mudskipper (Periophthalmodon schlosseri) (Right): The largest of the mudskippers (up to 30 cm), this species inhabits mudflats, clearings in mangrove forests and edges, as well as the banks of tidal creeks and other open areas. It is often seen in or near the circular pool that it builds at the entrance of its burrow, which has a low rim of mud to trap some water even at low tide. Its size enables this predator to feed on small crabs and even other mudskippers.

These were some of the many specimens featured at the recently concluded Festival of Biodiversity 2014, which was held at VivoCity last weekend.

Philippines: Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) forms body to probe fishkill

By Nitz Arancon and Lito Rulona, 2014;

The Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) has created a water quality management group in response to the fiskkill at the Agusan River here last weekend.

A local envionrment official described it as one of the biggest fishkills in the city so far in recent years.

The group is headed by EMB with local government officials, including those in Manolo Fortich and Libona towns in Bukidnon and Misamis Oriental, serve as members.

The group was formed in order to look into suspicions that plantations, poultry farms and piggeries in Bukidnon, particularly the ones in Libona and Manolo Fortich, factored in the fishkill at the Agusan River on Saturday and Sunday.

City local Environment and Natural Resources officer Edwin Dael confirmed that it has been suspected that toxic wastes from the Bukidnon towns resulted in the fishkill.

Bisan ang mga isda sa suba sa Balubal, patay man gihapon,” said Dael. “Ma-o na kini ang labing dako nga fishkill so far sa Cagayan de Oro kay ti-aw moy duha ka adlaw.”

The dead fishes were mostly anga (Red-tailed Goby) (Sicyopterus lagocephalus), banak (mullet) (F. Mugilidae), tangkig (eel) (Anguillidae or Synbranchidae) and pigok (Tapiroid Grunter) (Mesopristes cancellatus) that are endemic in Cagayan de Oro and Misamis Oriental.

The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) took water samples from the Agusan River for examination.

Mayor Oscar Moreno has called on the EMB and BFAR to speed up the investigation to determine what really caused the fishkill.

Dael said fishkills have been taking place in the city in recent years but the result of any investigation has not been made public.

He said Moreno directed him to closely coordinate with the EMB and make sure that the Bureau would act on the matter.

“We asked the EMB director to call for a meeting this week and conduct and investigation. Mayor Moreno said he wants someone to answer for the fishkill and that the EMB should file cases in the event that those responsible are operating outside the city,” said Dael.

Source: Mindanao Gold Star Daily

Philippines: Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) forms body to probe fishkill

Fish kill @ Barangay Agusan River

Source: Kenneth Padera Piloton Facebook

(This is Part 1 of a 3-part photo set)