Photo: Dr. Jeneveve Sulliva, via Friends of PMMSN – Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network Facebook

Philippines: Beached Pilot Whale rescued in Ilocos Norte
6th December 2017;

Authorities rescued a female Pilot Whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) found beached in Currimao, Ilocos Norte.

At about 6:00 a.m., coastal residents in Salugan village tried to get near the stranded marine mammal but due to strong winds, it was drifted to the sandy shores of Barangay Victoria, in front of the Sitio Remedios Resort in Currimao town.

The locals reported the incident to concerned authorities, responders for endangered marine mammals in the province immediately proceeded to the area to rescue the stranded whale.

One of the responders, Provincial Fisheries and Regulatory Officer Arthur Valente, said in an interview that the endangered marine animal is now recovering. “She can now float while supportive care is being administered,” he said of the Whale.

Valente added that the responders are still doing their best to stabilize the stranded marine animal before they can release it back to the open sea.

Representatives from the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, local government units, village officials, Philippine Maritime, fisherfolk community and the Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network based in the province are jointly conducting monitoring of the stranded Whale.

Based on initial assessment, Valente said the Pilot Whale appeared to be stressed and had bruises around the face.

Over the years, Ilocos Norte has been considered as one of the hot spots for stranded marine mammals, with a number of them successfully rehabilitated and released.

Source: PageOne.ph

Photos: Dr. Jeneveve Sulliva

A 3.85 m adult female Short-finned Pilot Whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) stranded in Gaang Bay, Currimao, Ilocos Norte this morning. The animal was released but restranded. PMMSN 1 lead by BFAR 1, LGU-Currimao, PVO and OPAG of Ilocos Norte, Brgy. VIctoria officials and fisherfolks are attending to the animal.

Source: Friends of PMMSN – Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network Facebook

Update, 6th December 2017 16:43

We regret to inform everyone that this Pilot Whale died early this morning. Necropsy is currently being conducted by Dr. Jeneveve Suliva and her team from the PVO of Ilocos Norte.

Source: Friends of PMMSN – Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network Facebook

Photo: Dhanjorvan Rasay

A male female Pilot Whale stranded in Brgy Victoria, Currimao, Ilocos Norte this morning. It is now being inspected by the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources. Picture and report by Dhanjorvan Rasay.

Source: Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

Philippines: BFAR: No fish kill in Pangasinan

By Leonardo Micua, 7th October 2017;

The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) has denied the occurrence of a fish kill in Sual Bay here early this week, saying it was the result of overstocking of Milkfish (Chanos chanos) fingerlings by operators.

BFAR Region 1 (Ilocos) Director Nestor Domenden said Friday two operators overstocked their cages, each one measuring 85 square meters, with 85,000 fingerlings, although it can only accommodate 45,000.

There are estimated 750 fish cages in the Sual Bay area, Domenden said.

Up to 30 metric tons of fish reportedly died from this episode, which was the result of the thinning of dissolved oxygen needed by the fish in the water, the BFAR official said.

Fish kill is commonly caused by pollution or by other contaminants.

Domenden said when an operator overstocks his cage twice the allowable number, some of the fish would naturally die as they compete for the only available dissolved oxygen in the water.

It was fortunate that the affected operators were able to harvest half of their fish before the incident, he said.

Domenden called on the local government of Sual, Pangasinan to strictly monitor the operations of fish cages to avoid a repeat of overstocking of fingerlings.

He noted that Sual had a standing municipal ordinance recommending the proper stocking of fish cages, yet it was disregarded by the two affected operators.

According to a report, the fish cages of Sual, located in a mariculture area designated by BFAR, are owned by local and foreign corporations.

All of these have a combined production of some 300,000 metric tons of fish yearly, being sold in North and Central Luzon and Manila.

Sual Mayor Roberto Arcinue has confirmed the findings of BFAR that no fish kill happened in his town.

Source: Northbound Philippines News Online

Philippines: BFAR: No fish kill in Pangasinan

A dead Green Sea Turtle
Photo: Allan Macatuno/Inquirer Central Luzon

Philippines: Sea turtle found dead in Pangasinan’s Hundred Islands
By Yolanda Sotelo, 9th February 2017;

A Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas), with a piece of nylon net and a hook in its mouth, was found dead at the Hundred Islands National Park on Wednesday (Feb. 8).

The Turtle was discovered near the cages of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Broodstock Development Center at 4 p.m., said the agency’s employee Mae Ann Maningning.

BFAR Veterinarian Samantha Licuden said the hook in its mouth might have killed the sea creature. She said the Turtle could have been dead for two to three days before its discovery.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

A Dolphin that washed ashore in Ilocos Norte died on Monday

Philippines: Dolphin with shark bites dies in Ilocos Norte
By Dennis Agcaoili, 7th November 2016;

A Dolphin that washed ashore in Barangay San Lorenzo, Bangui, Ilocos Norte died on Monday.

The Risso’s Dolphin (Grampus griseus), measuring 2.6 meters in length and weighing 150 kg, was found to have injuries on its body last Saturday.

Provincial regulatory fishery officer Arthur Valente said the Dolphin’s body showed evidence of shark bites and cuts caused by rocks.

Authorities were closely monitoring the Dolphin’s condition because it displayed no signs of buoyancy and was very weak.

The Dolphin was supposed to be released as soon as it reached a stable condition. It died Monday morning.

Source: ABS-CBN News

A carcass of a Sea Turtle, apparently found in San Fernando. This is a different carcass from the Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) found at Barangay Canaoay. The photos of this badly decomposing carcass don’t show the head very clearly, but the edge of the carapace does not look serrated, nor do the scutes appear to be overlapping, suggesting that this was a Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas).

Source: Bombo Radyo La Union Facebook