Eastern Barn Owl (Tyto javanica)
Jurong Island, 4th May 2016

This photo of a dead Eastern Barn Owl, likely to have died after crashing into a building, was shared by Lim Kim Chuah to the Bird Sightings group on Facebook.

The Barn Owl has traditionally been considered to be a single, cosmopolitan species (Tyto alba), but it has recently been split into several species; the populations found in Singapore are considered to belong to what is now known as the Eastern Barn Owl (Tyto javanica), which encompasses the Barn Owls in Peninsular Malaysia, Indonesia, Australia, and parts of the South Pacific.

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After a quiet day yesterday, another #deadbird this morning in the form of a Schrenck’s Bittern (Ixobrychus eurhythmus), found at the base of a HDB block in Jurong West. Cause of death remains unknown.

Source: David Tan Facebook

Picked up a dead Von Schrenck’s Bittern (Ixobrychus eurhythmus) From Singapore today. Body was found at the base of an apartment block with no apparent external injuries and no clear indication of a window collision (the body was facing the side of the block that was solid walls with no windows). I did a brief assessment of the pectoral muscles to check if it was malnourished but it was very well-fed so it couldn’t have died of hunger.

Source: David Tan, on Dead Birds (for Science!) Facebook Group

PLEASE HELP TO PROTECT SINGAPORE’S BEAUTIFUL PYTHONS – HELP TO SPREAD THE WORD

Last week, our 24-hr wildlife rescue team received a call about a Python sighted in a canal on Jurong West Street 92. To our shock and frustration, we arrived at the scene to find a dead 1.5m long Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) in the canal. The Python’s head was smashed by a heavy object, which no doubt killed her. There were signs that Python had recently eaten an animal, most likely a huge Rat (Rattus sp.), making him/her immobile and defenceless for a while.

With no one around to confirm what happened, and no cameras in the vicinity, all we can ask is for increased awareness and protection for these animals.

Reticulated Pythons are protected native wild animals, which use canals (and rivers) to navigate. They mainly feed on Rats, and play an important role in our ecosystem as natural pest managers!

It is best to leave them alone when sighted in canals/drains, or in natural areas. They are very shy and will keep away from humans – nothing like the fierce, scary creatures that they are often portrayed as in movies. If they are cornered or handled inappropriately, they can give a nasty bite in defence, just like any wild animal. These Pythons grow to a maximum length of 4m or slightly more, and do not pose a danger to humans if left alone.

Please remember to call our 24-hour Wildlife Rescue Hotline 9783 7782 for assistance if you see a wild animal in Singapore who may need some help.

Have a pleasant weekend everyone!

Source: Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES) Facebook

A beautiful but unfortunately deceased Jambu Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus jambu), a near threatened (IUCN conservation status) mangrove/rain forest species, but inexplicably found dead at the void deck of HDB estate. (Investigators suspect suicide but are not ruling out fowl play). Spotted by Veron Pwa at her void deck

Source: Sean Yap Instagram

An undergrad reported this dead male Jambu Fruit Dove , listed as near-threatened by the IUCN, today. The bird was found at the base of an apartment block with no apparent external injuries and no signs of head trauma, except that the neck felt unusually loose. Will have to dissect the bird to determine cause of death.

Source: David Tan, on Dead Birds Facebook Group

Bat End
By Solomon Anthony, 30th December 2014;

As I was walking, I was looking up at the trees to see if I could get lucky and see an owl or something. I then saw a sad sight that actually kinda ruined the evening for me actually.

I noticed something floating up high in the tree. Upon closer inspection I noticed it was an abandoned triple hook fishing lure connected to a fishing line that had got stuck in a tree. At the sharp end of the abandoned hook was its victim. I took a photo to confirm.

The clear outline of a Bat.

I can only guess that it had got stuck when it accidentally flew into it. Its wings were caught in the barbed hooks.

The bat must have struggled for a very very long time before dying a very slow death. It was sad to see that our carelessness or just plain disregard has is consequences. There were a few other abandoned hooks around.

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Source: Go Wildlife Now!