1. The bigger individual had a full stomach when we collected its content, indicating it was feeding before it met its demise.
  2. A squid (Teuthida) which had not been digested.
  3. Partially digested fish also in the stomach of the Finless Porpoise.
  4. Partially digested prawns in the stomach of the Finless Porpoise.

Last Friday (28 October 2016), we received a phone call from one of the fisherman in Kampung Buntal that there were two “empesuts” (Irrawaddy Dolphin) (Orcaella brevirostris) entangled in his net. Both animals were already dead when he hauled his net, so he brought it back to the shore and contacted us. When we arrived at the scene, it was confirmed that the “empesuts” as locals call it were actually Finless Porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides).

Samples and stomach contents were collected with permit approval from the Controller of Wildlife, Sarawak. A report and these photos have been shared with authorities from The Sarawak Forestry Corporation and Forestry Department.

If you ever encounter a dead marine mammal, please contact us. There are plenty of information that we can learn from a dead animal as we can on a live one.

Source: Sarawak Dolphin Project Facebook

(This is Part 2 of a 2-part photo series)

  1. The Finless Porpoises were entangled in a 3-inch monofilament gillnet.
  2. Both animals were released from the net, measured and samples were taken. One animal measured 1.34m whilst the other only 1.03m.
  3. Both animals were females. Notice the mammary slits on this photo.
  4. Clear signs of net marks and rope scars were presence on the body and flippers of both animals.
  5. Rope marks on the smaller Porpoise.
  6. Its teeth were not blunt and some teeth were still erupting from the tooth sockets, indicating this was probably a juvenile animal.
  7. Finless Porpoise as its name suggests, has no fin. Unlike Irrawaddy Dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris) or Humpback Dolphins (Sousa sp.). Skin lesions were observed on the flanks of one of the finless porpoise.

Last Friday (28 October 2016), we received a phone call from one of the fisherman in Kampung Buntal that there were two “empesuts” (Irrawaddy Dolphin) (Orcaella brevirostris) entangled in his net. Both animals were already dead when he hauled his net, so he brought it back to the shore and contacted us. When we arrived at the scene, it was confirmed that the “empesuts” as locals call it were actually Finless Porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides).

Samples and stomach contents were collected with permit approval from the Controller of Wildlife, Sarawak. A report and these photos have been shared with authorities from The Sarawak Forestry Corporation and Forestry Department.

If you ever encounter a dead marine mammal, please contact us. There are plenty of information that we can learn from a dead animal as we can on a live one.

Source: Sarawak Dolphin Project Facebook

(This is Part 1 of a 2-part photo series)