Indonesia: Phytoplankton population explosion caused death of fish in Ancol: Indonesian Institute of Sciences

2nd December 2015;

The mass death of fish, found washed ashore North Jakartas Ancol Dream Land beach, was due to a population boom of the Coscinodiscus species of phytoplankton, noted the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI).

In a press statement here on Wednesday, the Oceanic Research Center of LIPI said the phytoplankton population had significantly reduced the oxygen content in the water.

According to LIPI, based on tests conducted on the water samples taken from three locations on Ancol beach on Tuesday, the oxygen content in the water was found to be very low at only 0.765 milliliters per liter (ml/L), while the normal oxygen level is about four to five ml/L.

The low content of dissolved oxygen is the cause of the mass death of fish at Ancol beach. Based on the observation, the density of phytoplankton was recorded at one to two million cells per liter of water.

Coscinodiscus spp. is one of the species that is actually not dangerous, but since it has a large number of cells, it absorbs a significant amount of oxygen, thereby resulting in a drop in the levels of dissolved oxygen in the water.

Thousands of dead fish were found washed up along the Ancol beach early on Monday.

The fish species found dead included Milkfish (Chanos chanos), Mullet (F. Mugilidae), and Snapper (F. Lutjanidae).

Source: Antara

Indonesia: Phytoplankton population explosion caused death of fish in Ancol: Indonesian Institute of Sciences

Indonesia: Thousands of fish found dead in Ancol

1st December 2015;

Thousands of dead fish of various species washed up along Ancol beach in North Jakarta on Monday, allegedly due to toxin contamination from nearby rivers.

“Ancol management reported that it had found many dead fish on its beach early on Monday morning. When we arrived at the scene, there was around a ton of fish washed up on it,” said law enforcement head of Jakarta Water Police division Comr. Edi Guritno.

He added that there were various types of fish, such as Snapper (F. Lutjanidae), Mullet (F. Mugilidae), Grouper (SubF. Epinephelinae) and Milkfish (Chanos chanos).

According to Edi, after the report, the water police immediately took measures to remove the dead fish from the coastline, as well as investigating the cause of their deaths.

He added that the police, in cooperation with Ancol management, had deployed a pickup truck and plastic bags to take the fish from the shore to the Ancol garbage dump, where they would be burned.

Edi said the police had sent samples of the fish and sea water to the Jakarta Maritime, Agriculture and Food Security Agency (KPKP) for scientific examination to confirm the cause of death.

Nonetheless, Edi said that the Ancol management and residents suspected that the fish had died of poisoning from pollutants carried by rivers that flowed into the sea in the Ancol area.

Separately, head of the KPKP’s fisheries division, Lilik Litasari, offered a similar interpretation.

Lilik told reporters that she had met with a number of Ancol management staff and residents and also examined the condition of the water.

Based on her preliminary investigation, she concluded that the waters had been contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless poison carried in the mud from the rivers. According to her, the H2S deprived the sea water of oxygen, causing the death of the fish.

According to her, the poisonous mud had possibly flowed to the sea during rain last Friday and Saturday.

“This is a phenomenon that usually occurs early in the rainy season after a long drought. A large volume of water flows from the land to the sea, carrying along sediment that has been deposited in the rivers,” Lilik said.

However, Lilik emphasized that the current theory was only based on the preliminary analysis and that the agency would make a final conclusion after receiving results from the laboratory.

She revealed that Monday’s incident was not the first for Ancol’s management, as it had experienced a similar phenomenon previously, although not with an amount of dead fish as large as this.

Ancol management said that a similar incident occurred three years ago.

According to Pembangunan Jaya Ancol corporate communications manager Rika Lestari, the management had predicted Monday’s incident for over a week before the dead fish were discovered.

“A week ago, our field officers predicted this would occur as they saw foam on the sea water,” Rika said.

She added that in the name of safety the management was currently asking beach visitors not to swim on the beach.

Responding to the issue, an environmental activist from Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), Mukri Friatna, urged the Jakarta administration to quickly examine the quality of its sea water considering that Monday’s incident was not the first of its kind.

He said that by examining the sea water the administration could identify what substances were in the water and thus discover if the water was polluted because of natural toxins or a result of bad waste management.

“In the end, they [the officials] can decide the best measures to reduce contamination in Jakarta’s seas,” Mukri said.

Source: Jakarta Post

Indonesia: Thousands of fish found dead in Ancol

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead

28th November 2015;

Fish farmers in Kina­batangan ,the site of Malaysi’’s biggest Ramsar site, were stunned to find that all their fish, reared in cages, were dead.

“We noticed something amiss earlier. When dawn came the next day (last Friday), our worst fears were confirmed when we found all of them belly up,” said Kampung Mumiang Village Development and Security Committee head Mada Hussin.

The fish were reared in 50 cages.

Kampung Mumiang is located at the estuary of the Kinabatangan River and is about an hour away by speedboat from Sandakan.

The Convention on Wetlands of Inter­national Importance, better known as the Ramsar Convention, is an inter-governmental treaty that looks into conservation wetlands and their resources. There are six Ramsar sites in Malaysia.

Mada said the farmers lost Grouper (SubF. Epinephelinae), Snapper (F. Lutjanidae) and other types of fish, adding that the cost could come up to RM100,000.

This would impact about 50 families, he said.

“We want answers from the authorities. We want to know the cause. We want compensation from whoever is responsible for our losses,” Mada said.

The villagers, he said, would usually keep some fish for their own consumption and sell the rest.

“We have lost everything now,” he added.

He said the farmers were in a dilemma as they could not depend on catching fish at the nearby river due to dwindling numbers.

“The villagers are now waiting for test results on samples taken by the Fisheries Department.”

Mada said pollutants from a plantation could have flowed into the Malangking River, a tributary of the Kinabatangan.

“The last time we lost fish on this scale was about four years ago,” he said.

Cynthia Ong, the director of Forever Sabah which works towards an equitable and green economy, said such tragic events were typically associated with oxygen depletion in dead zones caused by fertiliser, palm oil mill effluents or disturbed peat soil.

“Studies in Malaysia and around the world showed that fisheries sustained by healthy mangroves are worth hundreds of dollars per hectare to the Sabah economy,” Ong said.

Source: The Star

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead

28th November 2015;

Fish farmers in Kinabatangan, the site of Malaysia’s biggest Ramsar site, were stunned to find that all their fish, reared in cages, were dead.

“We noticed something amiss earlier. When dawn came the next day (last Friday), our worst fears were confirmed when we found all of them belly up,” said Kampung Mumiang Village Development and Security Committee head Mada Hussin.

The fish were reared in 50 cages.

Kampung Mumiang is located at the estuary of the Kinabatangan River and is about an hour away by speedboat from Sandakan.

The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, better known as the Ramsar Convention, is an inter-governmental treaty that looks into conservation wetlands and their resources. There are six Ramsar sites in Malaysia.

Mada said the farmers lost Grouper (SubF. Epinephelinae), Snapper (F. Lutjanidae) and other types of fish, adding that the cost could come up to RM100,000.

This would impact about 50 families, he said.

“We want answers from the authorities. We want to know the cause. We want compensation from whoever is responsible for our losses,” Mada said.

The villagers, he said, would usually keep some fish for their own consumption and sell the rest.

“We have lost everything now,” he added.

He said the farmers were in a dilemma as they could not depend on catching fish at the nearby river due to dwindling numbers.

“The villagers are now waiting for test results on samples taken by the Fisheries Department.”

Mada said pollutants from a plantation could have flowed into the Malangking River, a tributary of the Kinabatangan.

“The last time we lost fish on this scale was about four years ago,” he said.

Cynthia Ong, the director of Forever Sabah which works towards an equitable and green economy, said such tragic events were typically associated with oxygen depletion in dead zones caused by fertiliser, palm oil mill effluents or disturbed peat soil.

“Studies in Malaysia and around the world showed that fisheries sustained by healthy mangroves are worth hundreds of dollars per hectare to the Sabah economy,” Ong said.

Source: The Star

Malaysia: RM100,000 worth of fish found dead

Kampung Mumiang Village Development and Security Committee head Mada Hussin (right) and government officers who went to the site to investigate showing the size of some of the dead fish.

Photos: Land and Empowerment Animals People (LEAP)

Malaysia: Kampung Mumiang villagers want answers for loss of livelihood
By Sandra Sokia, 27th November 2015;

Costing them over RM100,000 worth of their livelihood, villagers in Malaysia’s largest Ramsar site who lost seven tonnes of caged fish overnight want answers on what caused their stock of Groupers (SubF. Epinephelinae), Snappers (F. Lutjanidae) and other types of fish to die.

They had noticed something amiss with the fish, reared in 50 cages, before dawn on Nov 20 and by day break their worst fears were confirmed, says Kampung Mumiang Village Development and Security Committee head Mada Hussin.

“We were shocked to find all the fish floating dead in their cages although we had tried to revive them the next morning.”

“Villagers usually keep some fish for their own consumption and sell the rest. We have lost everything,” he said in a statement, adding losses could run as high as RM100,000 leaving some 50 families in a dilemma as they no longer depend on catching fish at the nearby river due to dwindling stocks.

Kampung Mumiang is located at the estuary of the Kinabatangan River and is about an hour away by speed boat from Sandakan.

Villagers immediately notified the relevant agencies and were now waiting for results of samples taken by the Fisheries Department, adding that they were also keen to know findings made by the Department of Environment and the Sabah Forestry Department.

Mada said villagers believed that the fish were wiped out by pollutants that had flowed from an oil palm estate into the Malangking River, a tributary of the Kinabatangan.

Villagers had earlier noticed a body of algal rich water in the tributary from that estate wash into the area.

“Prior to this incident, there was heavy rain for five days in a row. This may have washed pollutants from an agricultural estate into the river and impacted its quality.”

“The last time we lost fish on this scale was about four years ago. This time, we must be compensated, but first we need the authorities to provide us with reports of their investigations.”

He said despite the fact that the village was located within the Lower Kinabatangan-Segama Wetlands Ramsar site, the conservation area recently discussed at the International Heart of Borneo Conference in Kota Kinabalu, villagers were not secure due to the impact caused by plantations and other external factors.

Commenting on the incident, Forever Sabah director Cynthia Ong said the consequences of such tragic events were typically associated with oxygen depletion in “dead zones” caused by fertilisers, palm oil mill effluents, disturbed peat soil or other nutrients, wiping out whole areas of marine life and breeding grounds.

“These areas are important for biodiversity, including fish eating birds and mammals, and can damage even offshore fisheries.”

“Studies in Malaysia and around the world show fisheries sustained by healthy mangroves are worth hundreds of dollars per hectare to the Sabah economy. It is not right that anyone’s poor land management should make others pay those costs,” Ong said.

Sukau assemblyman Datuk Saddi Abdul Rahman had on Tuesday called for the matter to be investigated as part of his talking points at a debate at the State Legislative Assembly sitting.

Source: The Rakyat Post

Malaysia: Kampung Mumiang residents hope for compensation for their ‘caged fish’ loss

27th November 2015;

Villagers in Malaysia’s largest Ramsar site who lost seven tonnes of Groupers (SubF. Epinephelinae), Snappers (F. Lutjanidae) and other types of caged fish overnight are hoping for some form of compensation.

“Before dawn on Nov 20, we already noticed something amiss with the fish reared in 50 cages.

"By daybreak our worst fears were confirmed. The fish were all floating lifeless,” said Kampung Mumiang Village Development and Security Committee chairman Mada Hussin.

The residents suspect the cause to be pollutants from an oil palm estate, which might have flowed into the Malangking river, a tributary of the Kinabatangan following heavy rain for five consecutive days.

Kampung Mumiang is located at the estuary of the Kinabatangan river and is about an hour away by speed boat from Sandakan.

“The last time we lost fish at this scale was about four years ago. This time, we must be compensated but first, we need the authorities to provide us with reports of their investigations,” said Mada.

In a statement released through Forever Sabah, a multi stakeholder programme to support Sabah’s transition to a diversified, equitable, circular economy, he said the caged fish farm was a major source of income for the residents.

“We usually keep some fish for our own consumption and sell the rest. We have lost everything,” he said.

Losses could run as high as RM100,000 leaving some 50 families in a dilemma as they had ceased catching fish at the nearby river due to dwindling stocks.

Having immediately notified the relevant agencies, the residents are now waiting for results of samples taken by the Fisheries Department.

They are also keen to know the findings of the Department of Environment and Sabah Forestry Department.

On Tuesday at the State Legislative Assembly, Sukau Assemblyman Datuk Saddi Abdul Rahman called for the matter to be investigated.

Source: Bernama

Malaysia: Kampung Mumiang residents hope for compensation for their ‘caged fish’ loss

Malaysia: Fishes died due to lack of oxygen

By Kelly Koh, 29th April 2015;

The death of 8000 fishes discovered in Sungai Kampung Enam in Bachang here last Monday was believed to have been caused by oxygen depletion in the river.

Chief Minister Datuk Seri Idris Haron said oxygen depletion occurred due to slow water exchange rate between the river water and the seawater.

“The gates at the barrage door control center is only half open during low tides. A long term solution to increase oxygen level in the river would be to flush out river water completely into the sea during low tide, so that new seawater can be flushed in during high tide to ensure higher oxygen content,” he said.

Idris said another cause of low oxygen content in the river was the high amount of sludge in the river.

“Thorough maintenance must be carried out to reduce the amount of sludge in the river, and this requires a massive clean-up at the river-bed,” he said during a press conference at Seri Negeri here, yesterday.

For this reason, Idris said the Malacca River Cruises would be stopped for a day or two.

“As long as we provide notice to customers, explaining to them that the river is undergoing scheduled maintenance, it should not be a problem,” he said.

Fishes that died were mostly tilapia hitam (Mozambique Tilapia)(Oreochromis mossambicus, jelanak (jenahak?) (Snapper) (F. Lutjanidae) and keli (Catfish) (Siluriformes).

Source: New Straits Times

Malaysia: Fishes died due to lack of oxygen