Sumatran Palm Civet

 

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Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus)
Clementi Road, 3rd January 2015

This Sumatran Palm Civet was likely killed after getting hit by a motor vehicle. Photos were shared by N. Sivasothi.

The Common Palm Civet was recently split into several species, based on both morphological and molecular studies. The name Paradoxurus hermaphroditus is now restricted to the populations found in India, Indochina, and southern China (henceforth known as the Indian Palm Civet). Common Palm Civets in Singapore are now classified as Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus), along with those in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Java.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue too.

Poor Civet (Paradoxurus musangus) was well run over in Bukit Timah Road. Hazards of animal movement in urban environments.

Source: N. Sivasothi Twitter

Sumatran (Common) Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus)
Jedburgh Gardens, 16th August 2015

Becky Lee was informed about a roadkilled Sumatran Palm Civet by her friends Brandon Tan and Chan Hsin Yee. She was able to retrieve the carcass on behalf of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, and subsequently shared these photos on Facebook.

The Common Palm Civet was recently split into several species, based on both morpholigcal and molecular studies. The name Paradoxurus hermaphroditus is now restricted to the populations found in India, Indochina, and southern China (henceforth known as the Indian Palm Civet). Common Palm Civets in Singapore are now classified as Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus), along with those in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Java.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue as well.

Poor Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus) met with an unfortunate incident along Jedburgh Gardens in the Siglap area. Carcass is now with David in the freezer, and will be passed to LKCNHM. Carcasses are a sad sight, but their bodies can contribute to science. If you see dead wild animals, report them at http://lkcnhm.net/dead-wildlife.

Thank goodness for friends who live in the area! Thanks Brandon for holding the fort, and Hsin Yee for location information.

Source: Becky Lee Facebook

Someone moved the Common Palm Civet carcass from the road to the side using wet tissues.

Civet roadkill recovery – small actions can save the lives of wildlife
By Xu Weiting, 25th December 2014;

Two days before Christmas 2014, I came into office expecting an uneventful day. Not long after I reached campus, I received a notification from Nurliyana Omar, an Otterman Holt graduate who previously conducted a research on the Fishtail Palm (Caryota mitis). Liyana reported a Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus) roadkill carcass along Clementi Road, at the NUS Arts Faculty entrance on the first left lane.

This was the third civet roadkill reported to us in the month of December.

Once a roadkill is reported, it is always a race against time and traffic to recover an intact carcass. We could not retrieve the first civet roadkill at Goodwood Hill, reported to us by Dr. Darren Yeo, as by the time Tze Kwan arrived at the scene, the civet had already been crushed by multiple vehicles. Instead, tissue and hair samples were collected and deposited in the cryo collection in the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum.

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Source: Life of a Common Palm Civet in Singapore

Got a Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus) roadkill alert this morning from former Fishtail Palm student, Liyana Omar. The civet was found just outside the NUS Arts Faculty along Clementi Road. A kind soul helped to move it to the side. Please drive slowly, there are wildlife that use the roads too.

Source: Xu Weiting Instagram

Woken up today to be chauffeur for the corpse collectors.

Source: Zuze Boh Facebook

Our wildlife might coexist with us in urban landscapes, but that doesn’t mean they are free from threats. This morning, we received news of a civet roadkill near Dempsey. I’m sorry that your life ended this way.

Source: Xu Weiting Instagram

Was notified to collect a Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musang) roadkill this morning. We collect carcasses for research and education purposes. Sadly it was so mashed up by the ongoing traffic. Please drive carefully. You can save a life.

Source: Fung Tze Kwan Instagram

Photograph by Marcus A. H. Chua

Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus) at Grange Road

Location, date and time: Singapore Island, Grange Road; 14 September 2013; 1718 hrs.

Observation: An adult male of 103 cm total length, was found dead and bleeding from his nostrils at the side of the road, presumably having been hit by a motor vehicle. The carcass, in good condition without external injury, was collected and deposited in the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum at the National University of Singapore.

Remarks: This adaptable animal is widespread and common in Singapore. It can be found in urban areas and is known to inhabit gardens and roof spaces (Baker & Lim, 2012: 152). The Common Palm Civet, Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, has been split into three species by a recent study (Veron et al., 2014). The name Paradoxurus hermaphroditus is restricted to the populations in India, southern China and Indo-china (henceforth as Indian Palm Civet). The form in Singapore, peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Java is Paradoxurus musangus (Sumatran Palm Civet), named by Sir Stamford Raffles in 1821 as Viverra musanga based on animals from Sumatra. Those in Borneo and the Philippines are Paradoxurus philippinensis (Philippine Palm Civet).

References:

  • Baker, N. & K. K. P. Lim, 2012. Wild Animals of Singapore. A Photographic Guide to Mammals, Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes. Updated edition. Draco Publishing and Distribution Pte. Ltd. and Nature Society (Singapore). 180 pp.
  • Veron, G., M.-L. Patou, M. Tóth, M. Goonatilake & A. P. Jennings, 2014. How many species of Paradoxurus civets are there? New insights from India and Sri Lanka. Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research. p. 1-14. doi: 10.1111/jzs.12085.

Source: Singapore Biodiversity Records 2014: 295

On 7 Oct 2014, we were alerted to a juvenile Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) carcass along Mandai Road thanks to a friend, Edward Khoo who was in turn informed by his colleague, Hairi Zack.

Thanks also to Ong Say Lin who provided prompt help to collect the carcass, and Marcus Chua and Joys Tan who helped with measurements and preservation. This specimen will contribute diet and distribution data to the ongoing civet research.

If you have seen any animal carcasses, please contact the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum at +65 6516 5082, or email to civetsg@gmail.com with information on the species, exact location and condition of animal.

Source: Common Palm Civets of Singapore Facebook