Common Treeshrew

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Common Treeshrew (Tupaia glis)
Bukit Batok, 5th June 2018

This Common Treeshrew was most likely killed by a passing vehicle while it was attempting to cross a road along the forest edge.

Young monkey found dead in cage in Lentor

A juvenile Long-tailed Macaque found dead in a large cage in Lentor on May 17, 2018. Photo: ST Reader

By Audrey Tan
17th May 2018;

A young monkey was found dead near private houses in Lentor on Thursday morning (May 17), the latest in a string of cases involving human-wildlife conflict.

The Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) was found lying in a large makeshift cage by a resident of the area, who then contacted wildlife rescue group Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Acres).

“We arrived at about 9.15am to find a young Long-tailed Macaque dead with ants on her face,” said Acres deputy chief executive Anbarasi Boopal.

The cause of death was not immediately clear.

But the incident has raised questions over the processes involved in dealing with animals considered a nuisance to humans.

One issue, for example, is how often contractors check traps for ensnared animals, so that an animal does not suffer too long in the cage.

Mr Louis Ng, Acres chief executive and MP for Nee Soon GRC said: “The monkey should not have died this way and the contractor who trapped the monkey should be investigated thoroughly and brought to task.”

The Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) said it is investigating the case. “We have suspended the contractor while investigations are ongoing,” said the AVA spokesman.

She added that the agency would not hesitate to take strong enforcement action against the contractor if it finds any wrongdoing.

The area where the incident occured is located next to a construction site where a secondary forest used to exist. Works are underway to build private housing in the area.

To save the animals that once lived in the forest, the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) in 2016 embarked on a novel wildlife management plan. This involves gradually clearing the land so that animals are herded to nearby green areas, such as the Central Catchment Nature Reserve.

The AVA said it has received feedback from residents and the Neighbourhood Committee at Munshi Abdullah Walk area about a troop of monkeys in the neighbourhood.

Residents had expressed concerns over public safety, said the spokesman.

“AVA conducted surveillance and assessed that the monkeys pose a public safety threat. As such, AVA activated our contractor to conduct trapping operations in the area,” said the AVA.

Ms Boopal said removal should not be the first solution, if the surrounding areas remain suitable habitats for macaques. She urged residents to learn to coexist with wildlife.

“This could be done, for instance, by not feeding the animals or leaving food out, providing less of an incentive for macaques to be around”.

Source: The Straits Times

Daily Decay (3rd March 2018)

Daily Decay (3rd March 2018): Skull of Domestic Cat (Felis silvestris catus) @ Buona Vista

This skull of a Domestic Cat was found along the KTM railway tracks that run through Buona Vista, back when the trains still travelled along this stretch. It had most probably been killed by a passing train.

World Wildlife Day 2018

World Wildlife Day falls on 3rd March every year, and it’s a day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild animals and plants. The theme for World Wildlife Day in 2018 is “Big cats: predators under threat”. Big cats, and their smaller relatives, are among the most widely recognized and admired animals across the globe. However, today these charismatic predators are facing many and varied threats, which are mostly caused by human activities. Overall, their populations are declining at a disturbing rate due to loss of habitat and prey, conflicts with people, poaching and illegal trade.

In Singapore, both the Tiger (Panthera tigris) and Leopard (Panthera pardus) were wiped out, but the Leopard Cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) still survives. However, it too is threatened with extinction due to habitat loss and fragmentation. The roads that run along and through our forest fragments take their toll. For example, it was feared that the Leopard Cat had become extinct in mainland Singapore, until 2001, when a roadkill was found in Mandai, on the fringes of the Central Catchment Nature Reserve. Another roadkill was reported from Jalan Bahar, along the edge of the Western Catchment, in 2007.

Roads also threaten Leopard Cats and other wildlife in Peninsular Malaysia – even big cats are not spared. There are two notable recent incidents: in February 2016, a Malayan Tiger was hit by a car as it crossed the East Coast Expressway Phase 2 in Terengganu, which cuts through a forest reserve. A necropsy revealed that it was a pregnant tigress. And in June 2017, a melanistic Leopard (typically called a ‘black panther’) was found dead along Jalan Sungai Yu-Merapoh in Pahang, not far from an eco-viaduct that serves as a wildlife crossing.

Over the past century we have been losing wild cats, among the planet’s most majestic predators, at an alarming rate. World Wildlife Day 2018 gives us the opportunity to raise awareness about their plight and to galvanize support for the many global and national actions that are underway to save these iconic species.

Photo credits: Leopard Cat roadkill by Charith Pelpola
Tiger and Leopard roadkills from New Straits Times

Daily Decay (17th February 2018)

Daily Decay (17th February 2018): Lesser Dog-faced Fruit Bat (Cynopterus brachyotis) @ South Buona Vista Road

Daily Decay (16th February 2018)

Daily Decay (16th February 2018): Domestic Dog (Canis lupus familiaris) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

This carcass of a feral Dog was found in the mangroves in 2015. The cause of death was unknown.

Sumatran Palm Civet

 

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Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus)
Clementi Road, 3rd January 2015

This Sumatran Palm Civet was likely killed after getting hit by a motor vehicle. Photos were shared by N. Sivasothi.

The Common Palm Civet was recently split into several species, based on both morphological and molecular studies. The name Paradoxurus hermaphroditus is now restricted to the populations found in India, Indochina, and southern China (henceforth known as the Indian Palm Civet). Common Palm Civets in Singapore are now classified as Sumatran Palm Civet (Paradoxurus musangus), along with those in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Java.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue too.

Malaysia: Malaysian Nature Society concerned over dead Dolphins

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Picture of the dead Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin* found at the Tanjung Bungah beachfront.

By Imran Hilmy, 6th January 2018;

The Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) has questioned why no autopsy was conducted on two Dolphins found dead less than a week apart at the Tanjung Bungah beachfront.

MNS advisor D. Kanda Kumar said Dolphins are not common in Penang waters but have been spotted around the island sometimes.

He said it is quite baffling that the Dolphins were found dead in the same area within the same week

“This might indicate something is wrong with the waters there, we might not know whether the area is contaminated or the Dolphins had plastic waste in their stomachs”, he told The Sun when contacted.

Kanda Kumar said the relevant authorities should come and collect the carcasses for an autopsy.

He said without an autopsy, the cause of death of the mammals will not be known.

“There must be a reason why the Dolphins were found dead in the same area, there could be something wrong with the waters”, he said.

When contacted Penang Department of Fisheries (DOF) director Noraisyah Abu Bakar confirmed that the department had received reports from the public about the dead Dolphins.

She said the mammals are from the common species of dolphins known as Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)*.

She also pointed out the mammal is not endangered, the department is not required to conduct an autopsy on the carcasses.

“Following the standard operating procedure, we did not conduct an autopsy on the mammals as it is not endangered”, she said.

Noraisyah said necessary action had been taken by the department and urge the public to inform the authorities if they discover any dead marine species in their respective areas.

She also called on environmentalist groups and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to work together with the FIR in creating awareness and at the same time protect endangered marine life in Penang waters.

Source: The Sun Daily

*Contrary to the opinion of the Penang Department of Fisheries director, the carcasses look more like Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins (Sousa chinensis), and have been identified as such by multiple sources in other reports.

Thailand: Bull Elephant in musth dies after falling off cliff

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4th January 2018;

A captive-raised bull Elephant (Elephas maximus) released into wilderness in Lampang province was found dead at the stream near the foot of a hill in Harng Chat district of Lampang province on Thursday morning.

The 37-year-old elephant “Plai Somrak” was freed into the jungle under a programme called “Releasing Elephants Into Nature”.

Plai Somrak was hunted by Doi Phamuang wildlife sanctuary park officials three days ago after it was on musth and turned aggressive ransacking a Mae Pon elephant camp in Harng Chat and attacking the elephants there.

The male Elephant was chased away and officials launched a hunt for it for fear that it might return and harm local people and attack the camp again.

Officials later found it dead at Huey Mae Pon stream with serious bruise on the forehead.

Veterinarian at Thai Elephant Conservation Centre examined the bruise and believed it might skid and fell off the cliff down to the stream.

The fall broke it’s neck, the veterinarian said and added that it would be examined thoroughly again for actual death cause.

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Source: Thai PBS

Malaysia: Mystery surrounds Dolphin carcasses found on Penang beach

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Photo: Jeya Shah Facebook

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Photo: Department of Fisheries Malaysia Twitter

By Melissa Darlyne Chow, 5th January 2018;

Residents have been left puzzled after two Dolphin carcasses were washed ashore on a beach in Tanjung Bungah here within a week.

Sonya Shah said the first carcass was found on Dec 29, while the second was found two days ago.

While both Dolphins have since been buried at the beach, Sonya, who lives nearby, expressed her disappointment with the way the situations were handled.

“My mother and I struggled to get help as we called several fisheries, marine rescue teams and wildlife sanctuaries based in Penang and each of them passed the job onto someone else.

“Every one of them gave us different phone numbers to call and their reason for not attending to the incident was that it was ‘not their job’. They even advised us to call SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals),” she said in a Facebook post, adding that it took several hours until a small group of people came to help.

Sonya said she had expected the Dolphins to be taken to laboratories to be examined so that their cause of death could be determined and future deaths could be prevented.

“Evidently, these deaths must have been unnatural and I am no marine biologist but I know that this could have been avoided. Whether they had been poisoned, gotten lost, suffocated, or caught a disease.

“We could have helped and it didn’t need to result in death. They are just as worthy of living as we are,” she said.

Sonya also lamented the actions of beachgoers who had a total disregard and lack of respect for the carcasses.

“People were actually throwing shingles, pebbles and shells at the carcass and when asked not to fiddle with the body, they responded with anger, hostility and impudence,” she said.

Meanwhile, activist Andrew Ng said they had contacted the Fisheries Department concerning the carcasses.

“I personally think that they didn’t do a thorough job. They just measured and buried the body.

“They didn’t determine the cause of death or take any samples from the dolphin for testing,” he told FMT.

Ng said he sent photographs of the carcasses to the Langkawi Dolphin Research Centre, which provided information on the species of the Dolphins.

“The centre said that it is an Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis), a near threatened species under the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) red list,” he added.

Source: Free Malaysia Today