Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher

 

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Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher (Ceyx erithaca)
Sentosa, 27th November 2016

This Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher was found by Sarah Marie Pascoe and Riane Francisco in front of a building with reflective glass doors. It is likely that it had died after crashing into the glass. The carcass was subsequently retrieved by David Tan.

Black Bittern

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Black Bittern (Ixobrychus flavicollis)
Tampines, 9th January 2018

This Black Bittern had died so recently that the body was still warm to the touch, and the blood was still bright red and had yet to coagulate. It is possible that it died after flying into a nearby building. The carcass was passed to David Tan, as part of his research on bird mortality in Singapore.

 

It’s not every day you receive a dead bird notification that makes you swear loudly at your phone.

This strikingly-coloured bird is either a juvenile male Zappey’s Flycatcher (Cyanoptila cumatilis) or a juvenile male Blue-and-white Flycatcher (Cyanoptila cyanomelana), but either way it’s a rare passage migrant to Singapore. Unfortunately, this individual died after crashing into a glass wall at the Singapore General Hospital area, but we’ll be preserving the body for further research.

Big thanks to Zhaohan Goh for alerting me to this.

Source: David Tan Instagram

After a quiet day yesterday, another #deadbird this morning in the form of a Schrenck’s Bittern (Ixobrychus eurhythmus), found at the base of a HDB block in Jurong West. Cause of death remains unknown.

Source: David Tan Facebook

Picked up a dead Von Schrenck’s Bittern (Ixobrychus eurhythmus) From Singapore today. Body was found at the base of an apartment block with no apparent external injuries and no clear indication of a window collision (the body was facing the side of the block that was solid walls with no windows). I did a brief assessment of the pectoral muscles to check if it was malnourished but it was very well-fed so it couldn’t have died of hunger.

Source: David Tan, on Dead Birds (for Science!) Facebook Group

Picked up 3 carcasses today in Singapore, one Yellow Bittern (Ixobrychus sinensis) (top), and two Blue-winged Pittas (Pitta moluccensis) (below). The Pittas died after crashing into glass (seems like the main migratory wave is passing through right about now) and the Bittern was found exhausted in the middle of a carpark but died shortly after.

Source: David Tan, in Dead Birds (for Science!) Facebook

Blue-winged Pitta (Pitta moluccensis)
Tanjong Katong, 20th April 2015

This photo of a Blue-winged Pitta that had died within a school compound was shared on Facebook by Jo Teo.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue too.

A beautiful but unfortunately deceased Jambu Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus jambu), a near threatened (IUCN conservation status) mangrove/rain forest species, but inexplicably found dead at the void deck of HDB estate. (Investigators suspect suicide but are not ruling out fowl play). Spotted by Veron Pwa at her void deck

Source: Sean Yap Instagram

An undergrad reported this dead male Jambu Fruit Dove , listed as near-threatened by the IUCN, today. The bird was found at the base of an apartment block with no apparent external injuries and no signs of head trauma, except that the neck felt unusually loose. Will have to dissect the bird to determine cause of death.

Source: David Tan, on Dead Birds Facebook Group

It’s been a busy morning! I received a call at 9am this morning informing me of a dead Coppersmith Barbet (Psilopogon haemacephalus) near Chinatown. The bird was found alive on the ground being harassed by a cat, and it died shortly after of unknown causes despite the rescuer’s intervention.

The second carcass is that of an Indian Cuckoo (Cuculus micropterus), a common winter visitor and passage migrant through Singapore, that unfortunately died near the Chinese Library at NUS. I’m not entirely sure what the cause of death was, but the bird was found near to a glass wall (indicative if windowstrike) but it also had a gaping wound on its neck (which could have been caused by a predator, or a post-mortem injury).

Source: David Tan Instagram

Picked up this owl carcass on 23 March 2014 after it collided with a building and thought it was just an ordinary Brown Boobook (Ninox scutulata), which is known to reside in and migrate through Singapore.

After a tip off from a fellow ornithologist, I took a closer look at the wing formula and surprise, surprise, it’s actually a Northern Boobook (Ninox japonica), a new species record for Singapore and a considerable extension of the species’s migratory range southward down the Malay Peninsula.

My colleagues and I have published a paper based on this carcass and several other recent records of the species in the region, which is available here: DNA reveals long-distance partial migratory behavior in a cryptic owl lineage

Source: David Tan, on Dead Birds Facebook Group

Sometimes there’s nothing like a little brown job to give the old grey cells a good workout. Picked up the slightly desiccated carcass of this small brown bird yesterday (approx 11cm from bill to tail), which triggered a long discussion in the lab over its identity. Thus far the consensus is that it’s either an Abbott’s Babbler (Malacocincla abbotti), or a really undersized Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus sp). We’ll probably have to sequence the CO1 or cytb gene at some point to confirm its identity.

Source: David Tan, on Dead Birds Facebook Group

This bird has apparently been confirmed to be a Black-browed Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus bistrigiceps).