Mass Marine Mortality at Pasir Ris
By Sean Yap, 28th February 2015;

For the past few years around this time of the year there have been occurrences of mass fish deaths on our northern shores. This year is no exception. Ria was here earlier as well, and has done a comprehensive blog post about the situation. I’m just posting photos of cool dead things. I know I don’t sound sad but I am, kay 😦

So Chinse New Year is over, and the food guilt finally set in so I decided to try and run to work some of the sin off. As soon as I hit the path however, my nose was immediately assaulted by a foul stench. I had seen some of my friends posting about fish deaths on Facebook, so I decided to go see for myself what the situation was like (totally not an excuse).

The first stop was a breakwater, and LO AND BEHOLD, I was greeted with a friggin mass grave.

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Source: Nature in a Concrete Jungle


Thousands of dead fishes at Pasir Ris
By Ria Tan, 28th February 2015;

Thousand of dead fishes washed up at Pasir Ris beach today. Sean Yap also shared photos of dead fishes found on the same stretch of western Pasir Ris that I surveyed.

What is causing this mass fish death? Is it harmful to humans?

There was a line of dead fishes along the area I surveyed. Some had a thinner line.

In the part of the shore outside Pasir Ris Park proper, there was a bigger build up of dead fishes. But even here, the cleaners were trying hard to clear up the fishes. I also met Dixon who was cycling in the area and went down to the shore. I asked for his help to go down the entire length of Pasir Ris Park to see how widespread the dead fishes are. Thank you Dixon!

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Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

Casualties include eels, pufferfish and frogfish (which I’m seeing for the first time – sad it has to be this way). Cephalopods were not spared either.

Source: Sean Yap Instagram

Some tentative identifications:
Left: Estuarine Moray Eel (Gymnothorax tile), with Striped Eeltail Catfishes (Plotosus lineatus), Kops’ Glass Perchlets (Ambassis kopsii) and Telkara Glass Perchlets (Ambassis vachellii), and possibly a Threespot Damselfish (Pomacentrus tripunctatus).
Right (Top): Cuttlefish (Sepia sp.) with Telkara Glass Perchlets.
Right (Centre): Spotted-tail Frogfish (Lophiocharon trisignatus).
Right (Bottom): Spotted Green Puffer (Tetraodon nigroviridis).

Dead fishes found by divers near Koh Racha Yai.
Photos: Joe Blasy

Thailand: Phuket mystery: Autopsies yield no results for reef fish deaths
By Chutharat Plerin, 15th October 2014;

Autopsy results of dead fish collected at Koh Racha Yai off the southern coast of Phuket have yielded no clues as to why scores of reef fish are being found dead in the area (story here).

“We have yet to determine the cause of death. Experts conducted autopsies, but the results were inconclusive,” Phuket Marine Biological Center (PMBC) Director Ukkrit Satapoomin told the Phuket Gazette yesterday.

“Also, we checked the water conditions thinking that perhaps an influx of cold, less-oxygenated water transferred with more oxygenated water in the reef areas. However, that was not the case”

The other possibility is humans, Mr Ukkrit said.

“We have contacted people within our network and asked them to keep an eye out for any possible illegal fishing that might have caused the deaths. At this point, however, we do not want to make any unsubstantiated allegations,“ he explained.

“I have also contacted the Phuket Office of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) for additional ideas on what could be done to prevent the deaths from continuing.”

After the reports concerning the dead fish off Koh Racha Yai, reports of dozens of dead fish found along Nai Harn Beach surfaced.

“We cannot do this alone. People must not be afraid to contact us if they are able to document illegal fishing,” said Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) Region 5 Chief Tanet Munnoy.

“I am available 24-7, so call me on my mobile if you witness fishermen fishing in restricted areas or using illegal fishing practices. My number is 081 636-8099.”

Source: Phuket Gazette

Tentative identifications of the fish species pictured:

  1. Viper Moray Eel (Enchelynassa canina)
  2. Yellowfin Goatfish (Mulloidichthys vanicolensis)
  3. Checkered Snapper (Lutjanus decussatus)
  4. Streaked Rabbitfish (Siganus javus)
  5. Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus)
  6. Unknown
  7. Yellowfin Goatfish (Mulloidichthys vanicolensis)
  8. Streaked Rabbitfish (Siganus javus)
  9. Streaked Rabbitfish (Siganus javus)
  10. Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus)