1. The 50-year-old Orangutan died at a clinic after veterinarians spent several hours trying to save him
  2. Despite their best efforts, they could do little to stop the infections and severity of the injuries caused by being shot 22 times
  3. He was declared dead a few hours after arriving at the clinic run by the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program
  4. The orangutan’s right eye had been irreparably damaged in the shooting, while it also suffered a large wound on its shoulder and multiple fractures
  5. The injured Sumatran Orangutan was tracked and captured by officials after it was shot by local hunters
  6. It’s believed he was shot by hunters because he liked to eat from the locals’ durian fruit trees
  7. There are an estimated 7,000 Orangutan left living freely in the north of the island of Sumatra, Indonesia

Photos: Sutanta Aditya

Indonesia: Endangered Orangutan dies after being shot with an air rifle 22 times, including once in the eye, because it was eating crops in Indonesian national park
By Corey Charlton, 4th November 2015;

A critically endangered Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii)has died after being shot 22 times with an air rifle for eating fruit taken from local crops.

Veterinarians worked to save the life of the 50-year-old male Orangutan for several hours, but could do little after discovering 22 air rifle bullets riddled throughout its body.

One had destroyed the sight in its right eye, while it also had a large gash on its shoulder, several fractures and was suffering from severe infections.

The injured creature was tracked by officials in Mount Leuser National Park, Indonesia, after they became aware it was shot by hunters for eating the sweet fruit durian.

Andi Basrul, the head of the national park centre, told the Jakarta Post: “Many Orangutans have been shot before, but it is only this time that one has died so tragically, with so many gunshot wounds.”

He told the paper it was hunted by locals because it liked to eat from the durian trees they owned in the area. Although officials had tried to rescue it earlier, it evaded capture by climbing trees.

He added: “A week ago we tried to save it. But when we tried to catch it, it climbed up to the top of a tall tree.”

The species is considered Critically Endangered.

Found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, there are estimated to be around only 7,000 left scattered throughout the island’s northern rainforests.

However, the population is coming under severe pressure from desforestation – much of which is driven by the need for palm oil.

Source: The Daily Mail

Veterinarian Ian Singleton ponders the condition of a critically wounded male Orangutan, which died after an hour receiving emergency treatment.

Sumatran Orangutans threatened by forest destruction
By Sutanta Aditya, 3rd November 2015;

A series of deaths of Orangutans further confirms the destruction of Indonesia’s forests, contributing to the problem of global climate change.

The country’s biodiversity, including protected species such as Sumatran Orangutans, Elephants (Elephas maximus sumatranus) and Sumatran Rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), is currently under grave threat as a result of habitat devastation.

Amid wildfires and the ongoing haze crisis, coupled with unplanned population distribution for economic reasons, Sumatra’s forests are rapidly disappearing, with profit-seekers benefiting from conflict between humans and wild animals.

A recent medical examination by a veterinarian team from the Medan-based Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program (SOCP) found an adult Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) in critical condition. Despite hours of treatment, the ape was declared dead from stab wounds and 23 bullets lodged in its body.

A spokesman for the North Sumatra Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BBKSDA) in Medan, Evansus R. Manalu, confirmed the incident. “Our field officers received a report from residents on Oct. 21 about a severely wounded Orangutan. Mount Leuser National Park [TNGL] and the Orangutan Information Center [OIC] referred the case to the SOCP in Sibolangit,” said Evansus.

"In the Bukit Lawang tourist area between Langkat regency and TNGL, an Orangutan was found in a critical state by TNGL and OIC personnel,” said OIC director Panut Hadisiswoyo, adding that the ape had been killed as a result of conflict with humans, an increasingly frequent occurrence.

Intense Human-Orangutan conflict recorded around Mount Leuser is, besides deforestation, the area’s most urgent issue, prompting the OIC to step up its precautionary efforts. “We deplore the recurrent killing of Sumatran Orangutans, because the location is a tourist spot, and the dead Orangutan indicated traces of the use of sharp weapons and guns,” he added.

Based on SOCP X-ray results, some of the bullets had entered the Orangutan’s right eye, while its left shoulder was badly wounded by sharp blades. “We did all we could, but sadly the Orangutan died an hour after receiving first aid,” said SOCP veterinarian Yenny Saraswati via social media.

If Sumatran Orangutans continue to be killed and the species becomes extinct, the Leuser protected forest will lose a link in its ecosystem chain. As noted by the SOCP, Kalimantan (Bornean) Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) belong to the Endangered category of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), while Sumatran Orangutans are categorized as Critically Endangered, with only 6,600 left in the wild on the North Sumatra-Aceh border, according to SOCP director Ian Singleton.

Source: Jakarta Post

Indonesia: Sumatran Orangutan dies after being shot 22 times

By Apriadi Gunawan, 24th October 2015;

A 50-year-old male Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) has died from 22 gunshot wounds in Mount Leuser National Park (TNGL) area, Langkat regency, North Sumatra, after being caught eating durian.

TNGL officers took the animal to the Orangutan quarantine center in Sibolangit, Deli Serdang regency, North Sumatra, for medical treatment, but it died on Thursday after several hours of treatment administered by the veterinary team of the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program (SOCP).

SOCP director Ian Singleton said that the Orangutan was brought to the quarantine center on Wednesday night in a critical condition. The following morning the veterinary team anesthetized it, gave it medication and cleaned its gunshot wounds.

“The X-ray result showed that there were 22 air rifle bullets spread throughout the Orangutan’s body, one of which destroyed its right eye,” Singleton told The Jakarta Post on Friday.

He said that apart from the gunshot wounds the animal had also suffered from fractures and a large wound on its left shoulder. In such a condition, he added, it was difficult for the Orangutan to survive as it had also suffered from severe infections, with worms found in the wounds all over its body.

“Finally, despite the team’s hard work trying to save him, he died at around 6 p.m. yesterday,” Singleton said.

He said that cases of Orangutans being shot by illegal hunters occurred frequently, but this was the first time in which an Orangutan had been shot with so many bullets and in such a violent manner.

The most recent shooting case involved less than 20 bullets.

“This is really tragic. Its body and even its eyes are full of gunshot wounds,” said Singleton, predicting that the Orangutan could have been shot a week before it was found, considering the watery wounds, especially in its eyes.

He said that shooting Orangutans was a crime that carried a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a fine of Rp 100 million (US$7,142) according to Law No 5/1990 on conservation.

Head of the TNGL center, Andi Basrul, said that many of the Orangutans in the national park had been entering people’s plantations looking for food as big trees in the forests had been illegally logged and turned into oil palm plantations.

Some residents consider the mammal to be a pest and therefore hunt them.

“Many Orangutans have been shot before, but it is only this time that one has died so tragically, with so many gunshot wounds,” Andi said at his office on Friday.

Andi said he suspected that the dead Orangutan was one that had been hunted by locals over the last month, because it frequently ate from durian trees belonging to people in the area.

According to Andi, TNGL officers had long tried to save the Orangutan, but as it was a wild animal and liked to climb tall trees, they could not catch it.

“A week ago we tried to save it. But, when we tried to catch it, it climbed up to the top of a tall tree,” Andi said.

It was only on Wednesday, he said, that they succeeded in catching the Orangutan after waiting for a week for it to climb down from a tree. It was caught in the TNGL area in Bukit Lawang, Langkat regency, North Sumatra.

“Its physical condition was very weak when we handed it over to the orangutan quarantine center in Sibolangit for medical treatment,” Andi said.

Source: Jakarta Post

Indonesia: Sumatran Orangutan dies after being shot 22 times

Malaysia: Orangutan dies from injuries
28th July 2015;

The 20-year-old male Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) that was attacked by an Indonesian oil palm plantation worker died nearly two weeks after undergoing intensive medical treatment at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic facility in Sandakan on Sunday.

Veterinarians and other medical experts did everything they could to save the Orangutan named by wildlife officials as Gedau after Ladang Gedau, Beluran, about 65km from Sandakan, where it was found lying near an oil palm tree by plantation workers on July 13.

“(But) I regret to say that we have lost the poor injured Orangutan due to severe complication, initially caused by the savage attack by the plantation worker,” said a sad State Wildlife Director, William Baya.

Gedau was found with a long slash wound on his back caused by a parang (machete) as well as several smaller wounds on his head.

Baya said Gedau seemed to be improving after receiving medical treatment for the first few days and was reported to have been able to eat a banana.

Unfortunately, he said when Gedau was further observed and monitored it became obvious that the parang wound to the back was so deep that it had punctured the air sac, causing a severe infection.

The air sac is a loose pouch located around the throat of the Orangutan for vocalising.

“Even with all our expert care and medical treatment the results of the post mortem confirmed that the Orangutan died of an acute and severe septicaemia caused by the initial parang wound and also the smaller secondary wounds that were probably caused by the same parang,” said Baya.

With the death of the Orangutan, he said the case has now escalated to “a killing (murder) of a fully protected species.”

“I have directed my Prosecution Officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment to be meted out to the Orangutan killer,” said Baya.

Last Friday, an Indonesian, Syam bin Sul, aged 38, was sentenced to 12 months behind bars by the Sandakan Magistrate’s Court after admitting to wounding the Orangutan with a machete because he claimed the Orangutan tried to chase him while he was on his way back to his kongsi from work.

The charge was framed under Section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997, which provides for a penalty of a fine of RM20,000 or imprisonment for two years or both for causing reckless injury to protected animals.

The maximum penalty for killing a fully protected species under Schedule One of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment is five years’ jail or a RM50,000 fine or both upon conviction.

Source: Daily Express

Gedau when he was found at the oil palm estate.

Malaysia: Gedau, the rescued Orangutan, dies of injuries
By Stephanie Lee, 27th July 2015;

After two weeks fighting for his life, 20-year-old male Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Gedau has succumbed to his injuries.

Gedau, who was found on July 13 in an oil palm estate in Gedau, Beluran, died at 4.30pm on Sunday due possibly to blood poisoning from the infections to his wounds on his body.

Sabah Wildlife Department director William Baya said in a statement that Gedau died due to severe complications initially caused by the savage attack by an Indonesian plantation worker.

“Our veterinary and medical team at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic facility tried their best to save it, and for the first few days the Orangutan seemed to be improving,” he said.

“Unfortunately when the Orangutan was further observed and monitored it became obvious that the parang wound to the back was so deep that it punctured into the air sac (a loose pouch located around the throat used for vocalising), causing severe infection,” William said.

“Even with all our expert care and medical treatment the results of the post mortem confirmed that the Orangutan died of acute and severe septicaemia (commonly known as blood poisoning) caused by the initial parang wound and also the smaller secondary wounds that was probably caused by the same weapon,” he added.

Gedau was discovered by plantation workers at the estate not far from east coast Sandakan district and was handed over to wildlife officials the next day after the workers noticed wounds on its body.

Syam Sul, 38, claimed that he attacked the Orangutan after it chased him and has been jailed for a year.

William said they would be appealing for a heavier sentence to be imposed on Syam Sul now that Gedau has died.

“Since this case has escalated to a killing of a fully protected species and not just injuring it, I have directed my prosecution officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment for the Orangutan killer,” he said.

Source: The Star

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE FROM THE SABAH WILDIFE DEPARTMENT

SEVERELY INJURED ORANGUTAN DIES AFTER 13 DAYS OF FIGHTING FOR HIS LIFE

The severely injured male adult Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) that was brutally attacked by a worker from an oil palm estate located 65 kilometers from Sandakan has sadly succumbed to its injuries yesterday at 4.30pm at Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Quarantine and Clinic facility.

The Director of Sabah Wildlife Department, Mr. William Baya said “I sincerely regret to say that we have lost the poor injured Orangutan due to severe complication, initially caused by the savage attack by the plantation worker. Our veterinary and medical team tried their utmost best to save it, and even for the first few days the Orangutan seemed to be improving for the better. Unfortunately when the Orangutan was further observed and monitored it became obvious that the parang wound to the back was so deep that it had punctured into the air sac, causing a severe infection. The air sac is a loose pouch located around the throat of the Orangutan that he uses for vocalizing. Even with all our expert care and medical treatment the results of the post mortem confirmed that the Orangutan died of an acute and severe septicemia caused by the initial parang wound and also the smaller secondary wounds that was probably caused by the same parang,” added William.

An Indonesian estate worker Syam bin Sul aged 38 was sentenced to 12 months jail by Sandakan Magistrate Court for the above offence. He was charged under section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997 which provides a penalty of a fine of 20,000 ringgit or imprisonment for two years or both for causing reckless injury to protected animal. “Now since this case has escalated to a killing (murder) of a fully protected species and not just injuring it, I have directed my Prosecution Officer to discuss this case with the court to consider appealing for a much heavier punishment to be meted out to the Orangutan killer,” concluded William Baya.

Source: Sen Nathan Facebook

  1. Some of the wounds in the Orangutan are healing well.
  2. The deep wound caused by the parang.
  3. The injured Orangutan being treated by Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Clinic staff.
  4. The injured Orangutan being treated by Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Clinic staff.

OFFICIAL MEDIA RELEASE FROM SABAH WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT

An Indonesian estate worker Syam bin Sul age 38 was sentenced to 12 months jail by Sandakan Magistrate Court for causing injury to a male Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) at Gedau, Long Manis, Beluran on 13th July 2015. He was charged under section 37 of the Wildlife Conservation Enactment 1997 which provides a penalty of a fine of twenty thousand ringgit or imprisonment for two years or both for causing reckless injury to protected animal. The court was told that Syam slashed the Orangutan with a parang after the Orangutan was allegedly trying to chase him while he was on his way back to his kongsi from work. The prosecution was conducted by Abd. Karim Dakog from Sabah Wildlife Department before magistrate Suhaila binti Selag.

Commenting on the outcome of the prosecution, Sabah Wildlife Department director Mr. William Baya expressed satisfaction that the perpetrator of the unfortunate incident finally been dealt with according to the law. He said “It was unfortunate that the perpetrator chose to injure the Orangutan when he could have easily avoided it by running away from the animal, if indeed it was trying to chase him, because he can easily outrun the Orangutan. The penalty imposed by the court should be a reminder to would-be offenders of the serious consequences of injuring protected animals, more so with a totally protected species. We will deal with them according to the law,” Mr. William added. “Foreign citizen working in Sabah should abide by the law of this country” he further said. To prevent future incident such as this, he advised all managers and owners of plantation to inform the Sabah Wildlife Department if they come across protected species found straying into their plantation. “The plantations also should take the initiative to advise their ignorant foreign workers against hunting or injuring protected species,” Mr William concluded.

On another note when asked about the latest condition of the injured Orangutan, Mr William Baya mentioned, “After one week of emergency treatment and monitoring, the injured Orangutan was sedated once again today to further treat the deep parang wound. Upon a closer examination of the wound, we found it was extremely deep, where the parang had actually penetrated into the air sac, causing air sacculitis (state of severe infection of the air sacs). The air sac is a loose pouch located around the throat of an Orangutan, which is used for vocalizing”.

Baya further added, “Our veterinary team managed to suture the parang wound that penetrated the air sac and drained more than 120ml of purulent exudates. Other wounds were also treated but all were quite superficial and not at urgent risk of major infection. Even though his condition has improved, with the new problem of air sacculitis diagnosed today, intensive care is still required for the next few weeks. We hope that once all the problems are resolved, we will be able to return him to the wild where he belongs.”

Source: Sen Nathan Facebook