The dead Porpoise and other marine life washed ashore at Luak.

Malaysia: Dead Dolphin, fish and crustaceans washed ashore, cause unknown
18th March 2017;

A Dolphin Porpoise believed to be an adult male Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) locally known as Lumba-lumba was among dead marine creatures washed ashore since last Monday.

Oswald Braken Tisen from Sarawak Marine Mammal Stranding Network (SMMSN) said a staff of a club house – Beach Republic at Luak – found the carcass of the 1.39 metre Dolphin Porpoise at the beach between the club house and the nearby Luak Esplanade.

“Swift action was taken by the Department of Forestry, Miri and Sarawak Forestry Corporation, SFC Miri and other members of the Network upon knowing about the incidence this morning,” he said when contacted by the Borneo Post yesterday.

He said the carcass had been brought to SFC Miri for examination and was later buried at Piasau Nature Reserve.

Braken, who is also SFC’s deputy general manager said currently the cause of death of the Dolphin Porpoise, fish and crustaceans has not been ascertained.

“It is hard to determine and it could that the Dolphin Porpoise is injured or is old and sick. We are still investigating,” he said.

Asked why fish, cockles and crustaceans also died along that stretch of the sea, Braken said he had yet to receive further reports, adding that the case was the first one to occur here this year.

Last year, three dead Dolphins were washed ashore here.

Meanwhile, the staff of Beach Republic said that he had sensed something unusual when he detected a stench blown from the sea and many dead clams and cockles were washed ashore since Monday.

Source: The Borneo Post

The shells appear to be those of Button Snails (Umbonium vestiarium), while the Ray is likely to be a Long-nosed Eagle Ray (Aetobatus flagellum) and the fishes are a species of Puffer (Lagocephalus sp.).

  1. The bigger individual had a full stomach when we collected its content, indicating it was feeding before it met its demise.
  2. A squid (Teuthida) which had not been digested.
  3. Partially digested fish also in the stomach of the Finless Porpoise.
  4. Partially digested prawns in the stomach of the Finless Porpoise.

Last Friday (28 October 2016), we received a phone call from one of the fisherman in Kampung Buntal that there were two “empesuts” (Irrawaddy Dolphin) (Orcaella brevirostris) entangled in his net. Both animals were already dead when he hauled his net, so he brought it back to the shore and contacted us. When we arrived at the scene, it was confirmed that the “empesuts” as locals call it were actually Finless Porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides).

Samples and stomach contents were collected with permit approval from the Controller of Wildlife, Sarawak. A report and these photos have been shared with authorities from The Sarawak Forestry Corporation and Forestry Department.

If you ever encounter a dead marine mammal, please contact us. There are plenty of information that we can learn from a dead animal as we can on a live one.

Source: Sarawak Dolphin Project Facebook

(This is Part 2 of a 2-part photo series)

  1. The Finless Porpoises were entangled in a 3-inch monofilament gillnet.
  2. Both animals were released from the net, measured and samples were taken. One animal measured 1.34m whilst the other only 1.03m.
  3. Both animals were females. Notice the mammary slits on this photo.
  4. Clear signs of net marks and rope scars were presence on the body and flippers of both animals.
  5. Rope marks on the smaller Porpoise.
  6. Its teeth were not blunt and some teeth were still erupting from the tooth sockets, indicating this was probably a juvenile animal.
  7. Finless Porpoise as its name suggests, has no fin. Unlike Irrawaddy Dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris) or Humpback Dolphins (Sousa sp.). Skin lesions were observed on the flanks of one of the finless porpoise.

Last Friday (28 October 2016), we received a phone call from one of the fisherman in Kampung Buntal that there were two “empesuts” (Irrawaddy Dolphin) (Orcaella brevirostris) entangled in his net. Both animals were already dead when he hauled his net, so he brought it back to the shore and contacted us. When we arrived at the scene, it was confirmed that the “empesuts” as locals call it were actually Finless Porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides).

Samples and stomach contents were collected with permit approval from the Controller of Wildlife, Sarawak. A report and these photos have been shared with authorities from The Sarawak Forestry Corporation and Forestry Department.

If you ever encounter a dead marine mammal, please contact us. There are plenty of information that we can learn from a dead animal as we can on a live one.

Source: Sarawak Dolphin Project Facebook

(This is Part 1 of a 2-part photo series)

A 96 cm length, code 4 Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) was found at Paloh Beach, West Kalimantan today (9 October 2016). News by Dwi Suprapti WWF Indonesia. Paloh and adjacent coasts of West Kalimantan have resident populations of Finless Porpoise; bycatch is their main anthropogenic threat.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

The rotting carcass of a Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) was found on the southern coast of Bird Island in Bang Pakong District, Chachoengsao Province.

Source: Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) of Thailand Facebook

The carcass of a Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) measuring 1.5 metres long was found on Puk Tien Beach in Phetchaburi.

Source: Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) of Thailand Facebook

A young Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) measuring 85 centimetres long and weighing about 5 kg was found on the beach of Pak Nam Pran, Pran Buri District, in Prachuap Khiri Khan.

Source: Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) of Thailand Facebook