Daily Decay (17th March 2018)

Daily Decay (17th March 2018): Snubnose Pompano (Trachinotus blochii) @ Changi

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in February 2014, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor.

Many of the offshore fish farms in the Straits of Johor raise Snubnose Pompano for human consumption, so this carcass could have come from one of the farmed fishes, instead of being of wild origin.

 

Daily Decay (10th February 2018)


Daily Decay (10th February 2018): Snubnose Pompano (Trachinotus blochii) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in late February and March 2015, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor.

Many of the offshore fish farms in the Straits of Johor raise Snubnose Pompano for human consumption, so this carcass could have been one of the farmed fishes, instead of being of wild origin.

Snubnose Pompano (Trachinotus blochii)
Changi, 8th January 2017

Many of the offshore fish farms in the Straits of Johor raise Snubnose Pompano for human consumption, so this carcass could have come from one of the farmed fishes, instead of being of wild origin.

Photos by Frank Tan of Marine Life Aquaculture

Large stocks of fish wiped out by plankton blooms
Several fish farmers in the East have seen large stocks of their fish wiped out after the coast was hit by a tide containing huge plankton blooms.
28th February 2015;

Several fish farmers in the East saw large stocks of their fish wiped out early Saturday (Feb 28) morning after the coast was hit by a tide containing huge plankton blooms.

When this happens fish have to compete with the micro-organisms for oxygen, which could cause them to die.

Philip Lim, who owns three fish farms, said: “It’s huge. It’ll cost me about S$50,000. All the fishes have come in just about three months ago, some of them just came in one month ago.”

Mr Lim sent Channel NewsAsia videos of the scene on Saturday, saying his entire stock of fish was either dead or dying.

The Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) had said in a statement on Friday that it would monitor the situation, and work closely with the fish farmers to mitigate the situation.

It had warned the farmers early last week after detecting elevated plankton levels in the area, said AVA.

AVA has also deployed waste disposal vessels to assist farmers in the disposal of dead fish at the East Johor Straits caused by the elevated plankton levels.

On Feb 18, coastal fish farms at the Straits reported dead fish in the area. Since then, AVA has been visiting the fish farmers to ascertain the situation, offer advice to them to mitigate the situation, such as canvas-bagging, and collecting fish samples from the affected farms for analyses.

AVA said some farms have carried out emergency harvest of the fish in view of the elevated plankton levels.

It had earlier reported that laboratory tests conducted did not detect marine biotoxins in the fish. AVA said fish harvested from local farms are safe for consumption.

Source: Channel NewsAsia

The bottom photo shows a closeup of several dead Four-finger Threadfin (Eleutheronema tetradactylum). The news clip on the Channel NewsAsia site showed footage of a floating fish cage full of dead Snubnose Pompano (Trachinotus blochii), as well as a dying Spotted Sicklefish (Drepane punctata).

Fishes dying at Pasir Ris?
By Ria Tan, 22nd February 2015;

I heard the water was not quite right at Pasir Ris. So I had a quick look there yesterday.

I saw white powdery insoluble stuff deposited at most recent mid-tide line. Dead fishes of various kinds large and small every 20 steps or so. More below about why it is important for human health, to find out what is killing the fishes.

I saw dead fishes of various kinds large and small, wild and farmed, every 20 steps or so. Thanks to IDs provided by friends on my early Facebook post, here’s some tentative IDs.

Read More

Source: Wild Shores of Singapore

Philippines: Oil spill from Sual power plant threatens 700 fish cages

By Joel Locsin, 28th October 2014;

An oil spill from the coal-fired Sual power plant in Pangasinan is threatening some 700 fish cages in the area.

The sight of thick oil and dead fish startled residents in the area since early Monday morning, GMA Dagupan’s Joyce Segui reported on GMA News’ Saksi.

“Confirmed that we have an oil spill because of pipe rupture sa isa sa aming mga facilities,” said Jessa Calaunan of Team Energy Sual.

Since the oil spill is near 700 fish cages, many fear the incident may affect local mariculture and marine fishing industries.

The Sual mariculture park produces 20 metric tons of bangus (Milkfish) (Chanos chanos) and 10 metric tons of pompano (probably Snubnose Pompano) (Trachinotus blochii). Most are sold in Metro Manila.

Municipal environment and sanitation officials have taken samples of the water.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources in Region 1 has taken efforts to prevent the spill from spreading.

Provincial environment officials are also monitoring the incident.

Source: GMA News Online

Philippines: Oil spill from Sual power plant threatens 700 fish cages

Dropped by Changi Beach on Friday late afternoon for a brief check on the fish mass death situation. Lots of fishes that were likely from the fish farms (e.g. groupers, snappers, barramundi, pompano and golden trevally), but there were quite a number of wild fishes affected as well.