Daily Decay (21st February 2018)

Daily Decay (21st February 2018): Red Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Red Tilapia are hybrids, typically between Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), although other species have also been involved. They are commonly raised in fish farms for human consumption, and escapees are regularly seen in some parts of Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve.

Daily Decay (4th February 2018)

Daily Decay (4th February 2018): Red Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) @ Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Red Tilapia are mostly hybrids, typically between Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), although some Red Tilapia strains have involved crossing other species such as Blue Tilapia (Oreochromis aureus) and Wami Tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis hornorum). There are also red-coloured mutants of Nile and Mozambique Tilapia. Red Tilapia are commonly raised in fish farms for human consumption, and escapees are regularly seen in some parts of Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve.

Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.)
Kranji, 30th December 2008

This Tilapia was found floating in a concrete tank full of its live counterparts at Jurong Frog Farm.

The Tilapia species commonly encountered in ponds, rivers, reservoirs and canals, and even in mangroves, estuaries, and coastal waters, is likely to be the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

The Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is also known to be present in some of Singapore’s reservoirs.

Although reddish-coloured mutants are known to occur in the Mozambique and Nile Tilapias, the so-called Red Tilapia raised for aquaculture in Asia are predominantly hybrids descended from crossing Mozambique Tilapia and Nile Tilapia. Red-coloured hybrid Tilapia strains have also been produced by crossing Nile Tilapia with Blue Tilapia (Oreochromis aureus), as well as from crossing Mozambique Tilapia and Zanzibar Tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis). These strains have also been crossed with one another, with other hybrid strains of unclear parentage, as well as with wild-type Tilapia, which means that the ancestry of some Tilapia stocks may be unclear.

Blue Tilapia (Oreochromis aureus)

Zanzibar or Wami Tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis)