Striped Kukri Snake

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Striped Kukri Snake (Oligodon octolineatus)
Dempsey Hill, 22nd August 2016

This Striped Kukri Snake roadkill was seen by Ho Ee Kid, and shared with the Nature Society (Singapore) Facebook group.

Dead turtle found trapped in fishing nets along East Coast Park

By Tanya Ong, 1st June 2018;

A turtle was found dead and trapped in fishing nets along East Coast Park.

Trapped in fishing nets

It was discovered by wildlife lover Sidi Baker on May 21 at about 4pm.

He noticed the large net in the sea and realised there was a dead turtle trapped inside when he removed the net from the water.

He took to Facebook to share several photos of the turtle, hoping to “create awareness on what’s going in and at our waters and beaches”.

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This is his full post.

Wildlife harmed

Baker told Mothership.sg that he helps to remove nets or rubbish at the beach as “it might harm sea creatures.”

He also throws away unwanted hooks and lines.

In Singapore, where animal and human habitats overlap, there have been multiple instances of wildlife being hurt as a result of human activity.

Previously, an otter at Pasir Ris Park was found with a rubber ring around it, and a monitor lizard was seen entangled in a plastic bag along the Singapore River.

Source: Mothership.sg

Keel-bellied Whip Snake

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Keel-bellied Whip Snake (Dryophiops rubescens)
Pulau Ubin, 28th February 2018

This Keel-bellied Whip Snake was found dead on a road on Pulau Ubin, likely killed by a passing vehicle.

Daily Decay (9th March 2018)

Daily Decay (9th March 2018): Spiny-tailed House Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus) @ Bukit Batok

This hatchling Spiny-tailed House Gecko was probably squashed by a pedestrian, bicycle, or electric scooter while it was on the pavement.

Daily Decay (25th January 2018)

Daily Decay (25th January 2018): Changeable Lizard (Calotes versicolor) @ Lorong Halus

Turtle found in Yishun with fish hook in its mouth, dies from wound

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The Turtle succumbed to its injuries after it was found by a passer-by in Yishun Avenue 1.

Lydia Lam, 6th January 2018;

A Turtle that was found in Yishun with a fish hook in its mouth was taken to the Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Acres) to be treated, but it died that same day.

Acres highlighted the incident, which happened on Dec 22, in a Facebook post on Friday (Jan 5).

Acres deputy chief executive Anbarasi Boopal told The Straits Times on Saturday that a passer-by had found the turtle in Yishun Avenue 1 in the wee hours of Dec 22.

“The call came in at 2am. The caller said there was a nail sticking out of its mouth, and we realised it was a fish hook. It was taken to Acres and our vet removed the hook, however, the Turtle died that same evening,” she said.

The turtle was an Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtle (Amyda cartilaginea), native to Singapore. They live in freshwater streams, rivers or in reservoirs. However, it is unclear where this particular turtle came from.

“There are a few possibilities. It could be a native turtle from nearby Seletar Reservoir, or it could have been a released or abandoned turtle,” said Ms Boopal. “People think they are doing good by releasing them into the sea or a water body, but they might die as they are just suddenly left in an unfamiliar environment.”

Ms Boopal said the animal rescue group “increasingly sees a lot of wildlife affected by fish hooks, like Monitor Lizards, Snakes and a lot of Turtles”.

“We have rescued quite a few Red-eared Terrapins (Trachemys scripta elegans) with fish hooks in their mouths, even Box Turtles (Cuora amboinensis),” she said.

She advised members of the public who come across wounded Turtles or animals to call Acres at its hotline 9783-7782.

Callers should provide photos if possible and seek advice on what further actions to take. Some Turtles may bite, particularly if in pain.

Source: The Straits Times

Malaysia: Crocs spotted in Senadin housing drain

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The Crocodile that was found dead in the net.

By Jenifer Laeng, 6th January 2018;

Several residents in Senadin Phase 3, jittery after they spotted a few Crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) in the big drain at the back of their houses recently, are hoping that authorities could do something before anything untoward happens.

According to one of the house owners, she had been living here for years and the sight of the reptiles, believed to be the young ones, had becoming more frequent lately.

“In fact, one was found in the net by my brother-in-law on Thursday. He initially thought that it was not Crocodile, but when we had a close look at it, we knew it was a Crocodile,” she said when contacted today.

The woman, who requested anonymity, said her brother-in-law was surprised when he went to check on his fishing net on Thursday and found the reptile in it.

“The reptile measuring at about two feet in length was however dead when it was found so he got rid of it,” she said.

She added that the drain behind their house was quite big, and she believed there are more of the reptiles in the area.

“There has been no cases of croc attack here in the past, so we are hopeful that the authorities can do something about it to avoid any untoward incident,” she said.

Source: The Borneo Post

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AN UNDESIRED FATALITY

Imagine the worst sore throat you ever endured, or a large fish bone stuck in your throat. Poor Monsty barely endured the fishing hook wedged in her mouth, and it must have painful and excruciatingly uncomfortable for her. Sadly, she succumbed to her injuries.

The Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles (Amyda cartilaginea) are a native species, but Singapore also imports several thousands of wild-caught Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles annually for turtle soup.

You can help wild animals by not buying them from markets or contributing to mercy releases, because it only fuels the demand for the species. Help dispose fishing lines, nets and hooks that may be littered around our environment.

Source: Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Singapore) (ACRES) Facebook

Many-lined Sun Skink


Many-lined Sun Skink (Eutropis multifasciata)
Island Club Road, 16th December 2015

This carcass of a Many-lined Sun Skink roadkill was found by Angelynn Soo.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue too.