Malaysia: Crocs spotted in Senadin housing drain

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The Crocodile that was found dead in the net.

By Jenifer Laeng, 6th January 2018;

Several residents in Senadin Phase 3, jittery after they spotted a few Crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) in the big drain at the back of their houses recently, are hoping that authorities could do something before anything untoward happens.

According to one of the house owners, she had been living here for years and the sight of the reptiles, believed to be the young ones, had becoming more frequent lately.

“In fact, one was found in the net by my brother-in-law on Thursday. He initially thought that it was not Crocodile, but when we had a close look at it, we knew it was a Crocodile,” she said when contacted today.

The woman, who requested anonymity, said her brother-in-law was surprised when he went to check on his fishing net on Thursday and found the reptile in it.

“The reptile measuring at about two feet in length was however dead when it was found so he got rid of it,” she said.

She added that the drain behind their house was quite big, and she believed there are more of the reptiles in the area.

“There has been no cases of croc attack here in the past, so we are hopeful that the authorities can do something about it to avoid any untoward incident,” she said.

Source: The Borneo Post

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AN UNDESIRED FATALITY

Imagine the worst sore throat you ever endured, or a large fish bone stuck in your throat. Poor Monsty barely endured the fishing hook wedged in her mouth, and it must have painful and excruciatingly uncomfortable for her. Sadly, she succumbed to her injuries.

The Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles (Amyda cartilaginea) are a native species, but Singapore also imports several thousands of wild-caught Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles annually for turtle soup.

You can help wild animals by not buying them from markets or contributing to mercy releases, because it only fuels the demand for the species. Help dispose fishing lines, nets and hooks that may be littered around our environment.

Source: Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Singapore) (ACRES) Facebook

Many-lined Sun Skink


Many-lined Sun Skink (Eutropis multifasciata)
Island Club Road, 16th December 2015

This carcass of a Many-lined Sun Skink roadkill was found by Angelynn Soo.

Find out how you can contribute to Monday Morgue too.

Thailand: At Least 400 Rare Marine Animals Perished in 2017

By Asaree Thaitrakulpanich, 25th December 2017;

Thailand’s life aquatic faces a murky future after a year that saw sensitive species injured by humans, beached ashore or choked on trash.

Marine officials said about 400 endangered marine animals died in Thai waters in 2017, with the population of Dugongs (Dugong dugon) running especially low in a year that also saw the Irrawaddy Dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) declared endangered.

“I can’t estimate whether more or fewer animals will die next year,” Weerapong Laovetchprasit, a government marine wildlife veterinarian in Rayong said Monday.

Although the number rose considerably from last year’s 355, marine officials at a Friday press conference Friday said that’s due to better reporting via social media, not necessarily an increase in animal deaths.

“About 400 rare marine animals died this year, mostly because they were beached, injured by fishing boats or ate trash,” said Jatuporn Burutpat, director of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources.

Sea Turtles, Dugongs, Dolphins and Whales are all among marine animals considered rare.

The department’s developmental institute director Ukkrit Sataphumintr said that only 2,500 to 3,500 Sea Turtles are left in Thailand. There are important breeding grounds on Ko Khram in Chonburi, the Similan Islands and Mai Khao Beach on Phuket. He said the low numbers are a cause for concern but credited awareness campaigns for some progress.

“Campaigns for Thai people to conserve Sea Turtles only started working recently after 30 years of trying,” Ukkrit said. “Thai people only just stopped eating Turtle eggs.”

There are about 2,000 Dolphins and Whales in Thailand comprised of more than 27 species. Ukkrit said the marine department has been following the movement of these mammals, especially those of Bryde’s Whales (Balaenoptera edeni or Balaenoptera brydei), and identified more than 60 individuals.

Dugongs may be in the most dire straits, with only 200 to 250 left, mostly in the Andaman Sea around Koh Libong in Trang province.

Nantarika Chansue, a veterinarian at Chulalongkorn University, said passers-by who encounter beached animals should report them to the Department of Marine Resources’ research branches.

Nantarika’s efforts on behalf of marine animals came to public attention earlier this year when she operated on Piggy Bank, a giant Sea Turtle that died following surgery to remove 915 coins from its stomach.

In March, Piggy Bank became a symbol for Sea Turtles kept in captivity when the 25-year-old reptile died from surgery complications, capturing the news cycle for several days.

In December, the Irrawaddy Dolphin and Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) – freshwater mammals that have their last bastion in Thailand – were declared endangered by the IUCN Red list.

Any beached marine animals, dead or alive, should be reported to the Department of Marine Resources’s research branches in Rayong, Samut Sakhon, Chumphon, Songkhla or Phuket provinces for rescue or autopsy either via Facebook or calling the listed phone numbers.

Source: Khaosod English

Thailand: At Least 400 Rare Marine Animals Perished in 2017

Equatorial Spitting Cobra (Naja sumatrana)
Tampines Eco Green, 2nd December 2017

Photos: Info Kemalangan & Bencana Malaysia Facebook

Malaysia: Crocodile opened up to search for remains of missing man
14th December 2017;

A Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) was captured yesterday after a man went missing at Sungai Sebemban in Serian since Dec 5, believed to have been attacked by the reptile.

According to a Civil Defence spokesperson, the Crocodile was brought to shore after it was trapped to be opened up but no human body parts were found inside its stomach.

The missing man is believed to have been attacked by a Crocodile following the discovery of footprints of the reptile near the victim’s fishing gear.

Ariff Bagoh, 42, was reported missing by his family members after failing to return home from fishing on the day of the incident. The search and rescue (SAR) operation entered its sixth day yesterday.

Source: The Borneo Post