1. Children look at a dead Sperm Whale, one of four that died after a small pod became stranded yesterday in Aceh Besar, Aceh province, Indonesia November 14, 2017.
  2. A man walks near a dead Sperm Whale, one of four that died after a small pod became stranded yesterday in Aceh Besar, Aceh province, Indonesia November 14, 2017.

Photos: REUTERS/Oviyandi Emnur

Indonesia: Indonesian volunteers save six beached Whales
By Kanupriya Kapoor, 14th November 2017;

Indonesian volunteers managed to save six Whales beached on the northern tip of Sumatra but four died, a conservation official said on Tuesday.

The rescuers worked late into Monday night to free six of 10 massive Sperm Whales (Physeter macrocephalus) using ropes and patrol boats and turn them back into the waters off Aceh province.

“Some people got injured on the coral and the high tide was also an obstacle but we tried our best,” said Sapto Aji Prabowo, head of the Aceh conservation agency.

“It is an important lesson for us on how to evacuate such huge animals if it happens again.”

Prabowo said it was not known why the Sperm Whales, which are among the biggest mammals on the planet, had washed up in shallow water.

“We plan to collect samples from the dead Whales to determine the cause of death and for future research,” he said.

Officials will bury the dead Whales as soon as possible as there is a risk of gases building up and causing the carcasses to explode.

Earlier this year, authorities in New Zealand had to cut holes in hundreds of Long-finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala melas) that washed up on beaches on the South Island to keep them from bloating and exploding.

“If we leave them there to rot, that could also cause disease,” said Prabowo.

Volunteers will use excavators to move and bury the animals. An adult Sperm Whale can grow up to 12 meters and weigh up to 57 tonnes.

Though unusual, Whale beachings have been seen in other parts of Indonesia, a vast archipelago of over 17,000 islands.

In 2016, 29 Short-finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) were briefly trapped in a mangrove swamp off the eastern coast of Java, but managed to free themselves or were helped back out to sea by fishermen.

Officials previously said 12 Whales had been stranded in Aceh.

Source: Reuters

  1. A man touches a dead Whale after it got stranded on the coast of Pesisir beach in Probolinggo, Indonesia, June 16, 2016.
  2. A child hugs a fin of a dead Whale stranded on the coast of Pesisir beach in Probolinggo, Indonesia, June 16, 2016.
  3. Indonesian environmental activists redirect a disoriented Short-finned Pilot Whale to sea during a rescue operation in Probolinggo on June 16, 2016. Eight Pilot Whales have died after a mass stranding on the coast of Indonesia’s main island of Java that sparked a major rescue operation, an official said on June 16. Thirty-two of the Short-finned Pilot Whales came ashore during high tide early on June 15 in Probolinggo, East Java province.
  4. A man tries to rescue a Short-finned Pilot Whale which washed up on Randu Pitu village beach on June 16, 2016 in Probolinggo, East Java Province, Indonesia. According to the Probolinggo Head of Department of Fisheries and Marine Resources Deddy Isfandi, of the 32 Short-finned Pilot Whales which had become stranded, 8 died and 24 were successfully pushed out to sea.
  5. Animal rescuers try to rescue a Short-finned Pilot Whale which washed up on Randu Pitu village beach on June 16, 2016 in Probolinggo, East Java Province, Indonesia. According to the Probolinggo Head of Department of Fisheries and Marine Resources Deddy Isfandi, of the 32 Short-finned Pilot Whales which had become stranded, 8 died and 24 were successfully pushed out to sea.

Photos: Antara Foto/Zabur Karuru/via REUTERS, Juni Kriswanto/AFP/Getty Images, Shalasah Talista/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Indonesia: Most of beached Whales free themselves in Indonesia
By Angie Teo, Kanupriya Kapoor & Nick Macfie, 16th June 2016;

Most of the 29 Short-finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) trapped in an Indonesian mangrove swamp on Thursday managed to free themselves or were gently helped out to sea as the tide rose, fisheries officials said.

Villagers on the east of Java island helped fisheries staff free the Pilot Whales that became trapped at low tide.

“Today, of the 29 beached Whales, seven died, four were helped back out to sea and 18 were able to swim back themselves,” the World Wildlife Fund said in a statement.

Officials said they did not know why the Whales ventured into the mangrove swamp. Residents said Whales were rarely seen in the area.

Whale beachings, while unusual, have been seen in other parts of Indonesia.

This year, a four-tonne, 16-metre (52 foot) Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) was found dead on a beach on the resort island of Bali.

Source: Reuters

  1. Indonesian soldiers, policemen and residents work to remove a dead Whale stranded on the coast of Pesisir beach in Probolinggo, Indonesia, June 16, 2016.
  2. Residents take pictures of a dead Whale stranded on the coast of Pesisir beach in Probolinggo, Indonesia, June 16, 2016.
  3. Children stand on a dead Whale stranded on the coast of Pesisir beach in Probolinggo, Indonesia, June 16, 2016.
  4. An Indonesian soldier and a resident inspect dead Whales stranded on the coast of Pesisir beach in Probolinggo, Indonesia, June 16, 2016.

Photos: Antara Foto/Zabur Karuru/via REUTERS

Indonesia: Rescuers struggle to save beached Whales in Indonesia
By Angie Teo, Kanupriya Kapoor & Robert Birsel, 16th June 2016;

Indonesian rescuers worked on Thursday to save a pod of beached Short-finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) that got trapped in a mangrove swamp at low tide, fisheries officials said.

Villagers in the area in the east of Java island were helping fisheries staff trying to lead the 30 or so whales, most of which were believed to be young Pilot Whales, back to sea.

Several of the Whales had died after being hurt in the shallows and many of the others were weak, officials said.

“The residents are trying to push the active Whales back toward deeper water … but some are still stuck,” Deddy Isfandi, a fisheries official in the coastal town of Probolinggo, told media.

Another fisheries official, Wahid Noor Azis, told Reuters seven of the Whales were calves while the biggest of the adults was up to four metres (13 feet) long.

The officials said they did not know why the animals ventured into the mangrove swamp. Residents said Whales were rarely seen in the area.

Whale beachings, while unusual, have been seen in other parts of Indonesia.

This year, a four-tonne, 16-metre (52 foot) Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) was found dead on a beach on the resort island of Bali.

Source: Reuters