Oriental House Rat (Rattus tanezumi)
Tampines, 22nd May 2017 and 1st June 2017

One and a half weeks after this dead Oriental House Rat was first seen, all that remained were its skull and several other bones.

Plantain Squirrel (Callosciurus notatus)
Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park, 27th March 2016

This photograph of a dead Plantain Squirrel was shared by Raphael Siah.

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Plantain Squirrel (Callosciurus notatus)
National University of Singapore Faculty of Science, 18th March 2014

This carcass of a Plantain Squirrel was found by Amanda Kirsten Lek.

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Fig. 1: Roadkill specimen, Jemaluang, Johor. © Tan Heok Hui
Inset: Example from Sungai Bantang, Johor (2015). © Nick Baker

Malayan Porcupine Hystrix brachyura at Jemaluang, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia

Location: Jemaluang, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.

Habitat: Metalled road, next to lowland swamp forest and primary forest.

Date and time: 29 August 2003, 21:45 hrs.

Description of record: An adult (head and body length 60 cm) was found on a metalled road, a victim of traffic road kill (Fig. 1.). The subject appeared to have been crushed in the abdominal region, as indicated by the naked patch extending from its back to its abdomen, and with its innards extruding from the posterior end. The larger quills had become detached from its body.

Remarks: The colour of this specimen appears brownish, in contrast to ‘typical’ examples in which the anterior part of the body is black and sharply in contrast with the white posterior. A typical example from Sungai Bantang, Johor, is shown in the inset to Fig. 1. Similar brownish specimens also appear to exist in Singapore’s central forests, 80 km to the south of Jemaluang (N. Baker, pers. comm.).

Shepherd & Shepherd (2012) summarize the range of this species as “Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia [Kalimantan, Sumatra], Laos, Malaysia [Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, Sarawak], Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. Also found in Bangladesh, China, India and Nepal”. The state of Johor, Peninsular Malaysia thus lies in the southern part of its range.

Reference:

  • Shepherd C. R. & Shepherd, L. A. (2012). A Naturalist’s Guide to the Mammals of South-East Asia – Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. John Beaufoy Publishing, 176 pp.

Source: Southeast Asia Vertebrate Records 2016: 108-109

One for the @mondaymorgue, an as-yet unidentified rodent carcass from an undisclosable location. Spotted on Friday 11 Dec 2015.

Source: David Tan Instagram

Erica Sena Neves has identified this as likely to be an Asian House Mouse (Mus castaneus or Mus musculus castaneus).

Pellets from Tuas: 10. Black-shouldered Kite’s prey and bone fragments in the pellets
By Melinda Chan, Chan Yoke Meng & YC Wee, 6th June 2015;

On 12th February 2015, Melinda Chan collected two pellets from Tuas, around the area where the pair of Black-shouldered Kites (Elanus caeruleus) was nesting.

One pellet was larger than the other: 55x30x25 mm as compared to 21x20x15 mm. The larger was oval and very tightly packed in hairs. The smaller was disk-shaped, 21x20x15 mm, also covered with hairs but not as tightly packed.

The larger pellet was somewhat smaller than an earlier one that contained a complete skull, believed to come from a Common Barn Owl (Tyto alba).

However, on dissecting this larger pellet, there was no skull, only bone fragments from the head that included jaw bones, loose molars, an incisor, vertebrae, etc. But there was no complete skull. So in all probably the pellet came from a kite that had fed on parts of the mouse head and not from an owl.

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Source: Bird Ecology Study Group

Pellets from Tuas: 8. Black-shouldered Kite feeding chicks
By Chan Yoke Meng & Melinda Chan, 13th April 2015;

The ground below the nest of the Black-shouldered Kites (Elanus caeruleus) is often littered with carcases of mice and numerous pellets. The image above shows a headless mice found below the nest. An intact mouse was also found below the nest.

We believe they fell from the nest when brought in by an adult. We had observed that within minutes on the ground the dead mice would be covered with ants. Thus returning it to the nest would introduce ants and pathogens. Another reason these fallen mice were not retrieved can be that there were no shortage of mice in the area.

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Source: Bird Ecology Study Group