Oriental House Rat (Rattus tanezumi)
Tampines, 22nd May 2017 and 1st June 2017

One and a half weeks after this dead Oriental House Rat was first seen, all that remained were its skull and several other bones.

Plantain Squirrel (Callosciurus notatus)
Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park, 27th March 2016

This photograph of a dead Plantain Squirrel was shared by Raphael Siah.

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Plantain Squirrel (Callosciurus notatus)
National University of Singapore Faculty of Science, 18th March 2014

This carcass of a Plantain Squirrel was found by Amanda Kirsten Lek.

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Fig. 1: Roadkill specimen, Jemaluang, Johor. © Tan Heok Hui
Inset: Example from Sungai Bantang, Johor (2015). © Nick Baker

Malayan Porcupine Hystrix brachyura at Jemaluang, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia

Location: Jemaluang, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.

Habitat: Metalled road, next to lowland swamp forest and primary forest.

Date and time: 29 August 2003, 21:45 hrs.

Description of record: An adult (head and body length 60 cm) was found on a metalled road, a victim of traffic road kill (Fig. 1.). The subject appeared to have been crushed in the abdominal region, as indicated by the naked patch extending from its back to its abdomen, and with its innards extruding from the posterior end. The larger quills had become detached from its body.

Remarks: The colour of this specimen appears brownish, in contrast to ‘typical’ examples in which the anterior part of the body is black and sharply in contrast with the white posterior. A typical example from Sungai Bantang, Johor, is shown in the inset to Fig. 1. Similar brownish specimens also appear to exist in Singapore’s central forests, 80 km to the south of Jemaluang (N. Baker, pers. comm.).

Shepherd & Shepherd (2012) summarize the range of this species as “Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia [Kalimantan, Sumatra], Laos, Malaysia [Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, Sarawak], Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. Also found in Bangladesh, China, India and Nepal”. The state of Johor, Peninsular Malaysia thus lies in the southern part of its range.

Reference:

  • Shepherd C. R. & Shepherd, L. A. (2012). A Naturalist’s Guide to the Mammals of South-East Asia – Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. John Beaufoy Publishing, 176 pp.

Source: Southeast Asia Vertebrate Records 2016: 108-109

Thailand: Flying Squirrels Rescued after their Home was set on Fire
23rd June 2016;

Yesterday evening some concern locals brought in a pair of Grey-cheeked Flying Squirrels (Hylopetes lepidus) into the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre for emergency treatment. They had been found on the floor under a burning tree after it had been set on fire by a farmer who was clearing an area of land to create more space to grow his produce. Human-wildlife conflict doesn’t only occur with megafauna such as Elephants, it affects many of the Earth’s species. Having been almost burned alive in their home these shy tree-dwelling nocturnal rodents fell to the ground, they sustained many burns over their small bodies. Much of the fur has been damaged by the fire, their little hands and feet are badly burned, and their eyelashes have been totally singed off. The WFFT Vet Team have cleaned and treated the burns, they are now being cared for in the WFFT Wildlife Hospital. Unfortunately for these little ones it means they have been displaced, and are now homeless, if they manage to survive this ordeal we will need to find a suitable environment, far away from humans to release them bacl to the wild. We will do everything we can to help these little souls recover. If they pull through they will be taken to a safe protected forest area.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 2 of a 2-part photo set)

Thailand: Flying Squirrels Rescued after their Home was set on Fire
23rd June 2016;

Yesterday evening some concern locals brought in a pair of Grey-cheeked Flying Squirrels (Hylopetes lepidus) into the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre for emergency treatment. They had been found on the floor under a burning tree after it had been set on fire by a farmer who was clearing an area of land to create more space to grow his produce. Human-wildlife conflict doesn’t only occur with megafauna such as Elephants, it affects many of the Earth’s species. Having been almost burned alive in their home these shy tree-dwelling nocturnal rodents fell to the ground, they sustained many burns over their small bodies. Much of the fur has been damaged by the fire, their little hands and feet are badly burned, and their eyelashes have been totally singed off. The WFFT Vet Team have cleaned and treated the burns, they are now being cared for in the WFFT Wildlife Hospital. Unfortunately for these little ones it means they have been displaced, and are now homeless, if they manage to survive this ordeal we will need to find a suitable environment, far away from humans to release them bacl to the wild. We will do everything we can to help these little souls recover. If they pull through they will be taken to a safe protected forest area.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 1 of a 2-part photo set)

One for the @mondaymorgue, an as-yet unidentified rodent carcass from an undisclosable location. Spotted on Friday 11 Dec 2015.

Source: David Tan Instagram

Erica Sena Neves has identified this as likely to be an Asian House Mouse (Mus castaneus or Mus musculus castaneus).