The rotting carcass of a male Irrawaddy Dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris measuring 89.6 centimetres in length was found in Bang Poo, Samut Prakarn.

Source: Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) of Thailand Facebook

Thailand: Whale died of sudden shock
3rd July 2014;

The Bryde’s Whale (Balaenoptera edeni) which was found dead in the coastal mangrove forest in Tambon Laem Fah Pa of Samut Prakan on June 29 was believed to have died of sudden shock caused by extreme stress after being caught in fishing net.

The cause of the Whale’s death was announced Thursday by Dr Nanthrika Sansue, director of the Research Centre on Diseases of Marine Lives, Chulalongkorn University, at a press conference held at the department of marine and coastal resources.

The male Whale was about ten years old 11.27 metres long and weighed about eight tonnes. Its skin bore four markings of being bound.

Dr Nanthrika said that the animal’s stomach was full of food but there were no traces of alien matters in its intestines. The lungs were fine but no blood was found in its heart with its muscle tightened, she said, adding that the symptoms suggested that the beast suffered sudden shock and died unnaturally.

On how to dispose of the rotten carcass, Mr Noppol Srisuk, director-general of marine and coastal sources, said that the carcass would be cut up in small pieces and some of the samples would be sent to a laboratory for toxic tests and if no traces of toxic substances were found, a private firm would be hired to get rid of the carcass.

He also warned tour operators and fishermen to attach importance to the Whales and to refrain from getting too close to them.

There are approximately 45 Bryde’s Whales in the upper part of the Gulf of Thailand. They can be seen almost throughout the year in the sea 4-30 kilometres off the coasts of Samut Prakan, Samut Sakhon, Samut Songkram and Petchaburi.

Source: Thai PBS

The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Sittang or Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Confusion with the similar Omura’s Whale (Balaenoptera omurai) is also possible.

Dead Bryde’s Whale washed ashore in Samut Prakarn
1st July 2014;

A dead Bryde’s Chale (Balaenoptera edeni) weighing about 11 tons was washed ashore in Phra Samut Chedi district of Samut Prakarn province.

The Whale is 11 metres long. It was found by residents near the Phra Chulachomklao fortress shore.

The cause of death of this sea mammal was not known but locals said they spotted the dead Whale in the sea a few days earlier but could do nothing because of its size.

The dead Whale was washed ashore only yesterday.

Officials from the Marine Resources Research and Development Centre in the Gulf of Thailand have inspected the body of the Whale but could not find a cause yet.

They have collected samples of its skin tissues and fin for laboratory test before the exact cause could be established.

But an assistant village headman Wisanu Kengsamut said local people have sighted the dead Whale on Sunday at the shore near the navy prison.

He went to inspect the Whale with the centre officials by boat but could not get near because the area is used for shell farming and has lots of poles, and therefore could not drag it out.

He said he has to wait until the wind and waves washed it to shore.

But he noticed that the Whale was decomposed and might have died two weeks ago.

He also said that there are about 50 Bryde’s Whales wandering for food in the Gulf of Thailand near Samut Prakarn.

This dead whale was the second dead Whale that was washed ashore in the past seven years.

Source: Thai PBS

The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Sittang or Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Confusion with the similar Omura’s Whale (Balaenoptera omurai) is also possible.