Daily Decay (13th May 2018)

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Daily Decay (13th May 2018): Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of yet another fish mass mortality event that was triggered by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor in February and March 2015.

Sagor Catfish

 

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Sagor Catfish (Hexanematichthys sagor)
Yishun Dam, 26th October 2013

These photographs of a Sagor Catfish were shared by ‘Nikita Hengbok’.

African Walking Catfish

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African Walking Catfish (Clarias gariepinus)
Kampong Java Park, 24th September 2016

This dead African Walking Catfish was spotted by Kian Min Yeo, and shared to Monday Morgue’s Facebook page.

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Daily Decay (28th February 2018)

Daily Decay (28th February 2018): Eeltail Catfish (F. Plotosidae) @ Changi

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in February 2014, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor. Three species of Eeltail Catfish are present in Singapore waters – the Striped Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus lineatus), Black Eeltail Catfish (Plotosus canius), and White-lipped Eeltail Catfish (Paraplotosus albilabris). Due to the decomposed state of this carcass, it’s not clear which species it is.

Source: Hilbert Montell Facebook

Some of the dead fishes seen in Sungai Oya in Sarawak, presumably casualties of a recent mass mortality event. Two of the fishes in these photos are identifiable as Fire Eel (Mastacembelus erythrotaenia), while the other two are of unidentifiable Catfishes (Siluriformes).

 

Malaysia: No reason found yet on why lobsters, fish in Oya River died


Source: Berita Harian

22nd February 2018;

The mass surfacing and and subsequent dying of aquatic life, particularly lobsters prawns and fish, in Oya River, Dalat that went viral on social media could have been caused by many factors, including poisoning.

Nanoplankton specialist Musa Musbah said 20 to 30 years ago, such phenomenon occurred not only in Dalat river but also in other rivers in Sarawak including in Niah and Sibuti areas in Miri, with varying degrees.

He was asked to comment on the so-called ‘drunken phenomenon’ of aquatic life in Oya River, which drew many comments on his Facebook page.

Musa reminded those who doubted the safety of such prawns or fish sold in the market to temporarily avoid eating them until the authorities come up with their findings and give assurance that whatever is caught from the river is safe to consume.

He did not deny that there might be some individuals who used poison to catch fish and prawns due to ignorance on its impact on health, while there might be others who did it for quick profit.

Meanwhile, Natural Resources and Environment Minister Dato Sri Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar was reported in the local media as saying that the Department of Environment (DoE) would investigate and study the causes of the phenomenon.

Source: The Borneo Post

Those are not lobsters, but Giant River Prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), while the fish in the photo appears to be a Helicopter Catfish (Wallagonia leerii).

 

Malaysia: Visitor released fish into lake

 

Photos: Rahayusnida Roosley Facebook

21st February 2018;

The mystery behind scores of dead fish found floating in Tasik Permaisuri Park, Cheras, may have been solved.

A visitor was reportedly seen releasing a batch of Catfish into the lake on Saturday morning, a day before a large number of fish were found floating in the lake, giving out a foul smell.

Kuala Lumpur City Hall corporate planning director Fadzilah Abd Rashid said the fish likely died as they could not adapt to the new environment.

“The maintenance and administration team did not receive any request from the public to release fish into the lake.”

Fadzilah said similar incidents happened last year, where fish reared as pets were released into lakes around the city.

Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Ministry’s deputy secretary-general (policy), Datuk Sallehhuddin Hassan, said the Fisheries Department had collected fish samples for tests.

“We sent our officers to take samples of the lake water and fish,” he said, adding that the ministry would work with the Department of Environment on the matter.

The Fisheries Department, in a statement, said images posted on social media showed that the dead fish belonged to the Catfish species.

“A team was despatched to check the site after a report was lodged by the public.”

He said the turbidity and oxygen levels in the lake were normal.

It was learned that the department had not approved any fish-breeding programmes in the park.

Source: New Straits Times

The photos show what are likely to be Walking Catfish (F. Clariidae). Several species are raised for food in Malaysia, such as the native Common Walking Catfish (Clarias aff. batrachus), the possibly non-native Broadhead Catfish (Clarias macrocephalus), and the introduced Clarias gariepinus, as well as hybrids between the three species.

Malaysia: Dead fish in Cheras lake


Photos: Rahayusnida Roosley Facebook

20th February 2018;

The sight and smell of dead fish floating at the lake at Taman Tasik Permaisuri in Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, shocked many people over the weekend.

Joggers and visitors who frequented the park claimed a foul smell was permeating the area on Sunday morning.

This led them to the dead fish at the lake.

Rahayusnida Roosley, 52, said she saw many dead fish at the end of the lake close to the Bandar Tun Razak Stadium.

She was there with family members jogging when they made the discovery.

“I was there from 7.30am to 9am.

“It’s a landscaped park with ample parking paths and a lovely lake with water features. It’s frequented by a lot of people who jog, walk, do tai-chi and aerobics.

“It’s a shame if the park is not maintained. I hope Kuala Lumpur City Hall will fix it soon,” said Rahayusnida, who posted pictures of the dead fish on her Facebook account.

Checks by Actionline the same day saw some fish floating, but not as many as indicated in the photos taken by Rohayunisda.

A visitor, Shakir, 19, when met at the park, said he saw the dead fish the night before, but did not report it to the authorities because it was late in the evening.

“I was at the park with friends when I noticed something floating on the lake.

“I do not know about my friends, but I saw the fish floating, so I assumed they were dead.

“I figured the park maintenance workers would take care of it.”

Another visitor, who wanted to be known only as Din, claimed that the lake would normally be replenished with fish before fishing competitions.

City Hall health and environment director Datin D. Noor Akma Shabudin confirmed reports were lodged by the public on the dead fish.

She said City Hall would get to the bottom of the problem and would seek help from other departments.

“We have notified the Fisheries Department to take samples from the lake to determine the cause.

“The Landscape Department has been informed as the park is under its purview.”

“I do not know about dead fish, but usually, when festive seasons come, there will be fishing competitions.

“It could probably be fish that were released for the competitions, but they then died.”

A maintenance supervisor, who declined to be named, said visitors complained to them about the dead fish the same day and some claimed the fish might have been poisoned.

“I received a complaint from the visitors around 8am and went to see the lake before calling the cleaning team.

“I saw Catfish with breadcrumbs near them. This is the first time Taman Tasik Permaisuri has faced such a bizarre situation. We removed the fish because the smell was unbearable.”

Source: New Straits Times

The photos show what are likely to be Walking Catfish (F. Clariidae). Several species are raised for food in Malaysia, such as the native Common Walking Catfish (Clarias aff. batrachus), the possibly non-native Broadhead Catfish (Clarias macrocephalus), and the introduced Clarias gariepinus, as well as hybrids between the three species.

Malaysia: Caged fish breeders suffer major losses due to flood

13th January 2018;

The flood that hit the district early this month had not only caused damage to public and private properties, but also caused major losses to caged fish breeders here as they were left with thousands of dead fish.

Most of the breeders attributed the death of their fish to several reasons, including the strong river current on Jan 1 and 2 when the water level of Sungai Pahang began to rise.

Khaidir Ahmad, 55, from Kampung Tebing Tinggi, Lebak here, when contacted today said he suffered losses of more than RM33,000 after over 5,000 patin (Iridescent Shark Catfish) (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and Tilapia (Oreochromis spp.), as well as 300 kerai (Lemon-fin Barb) (Hypsibarbus wetmorei) fish, in his cages died during the flood.

He said the strong river current had caused the fish to suffer wounds as they were cornered and squeezed to the cage.

“The fish were also believed to have died due to the high turbidity level of the river which caused the fish gills to be covered with mud and deprived them of oxygen,” he said, adding that bacterial infection in the eyes and scales of the fish due to the deterioration in the water quality of Sungai Pahang was also believed to be the cause of death of the fish.

Meanwhile, Temerloh Fisheries Officer Shahidan Roslan said the Fisheries Department had taken samples from the live fish in order to determine the cause of death of thousands of caged fish of several breeders in the district.

He said the department had also informed the state Fisheries Department Bio-security Division, immediately after receiving a report on the incident.

Shahidan said initial inspection found that the death of patin and Tilapia fish was probably due to the strong river water pressure during the recent flood.

“The investigation revealed that most of the dead fish were found in the front area of the cage which might have received the high impact of the strong current,” he said.

Source: The Sun Daily

African Walking Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) being scavenged by Apple Snails (Pomacea sp.)
Kallang Riverside Park, 2nd February 2015

This photograph of a dead African Walking Catfish was shared by Leroy Alphonso. This invasive species, introduced to Singapore in the 1990s, has effectively replaced the native Common Walking Catfish (Clarias batrachus) in both rural and urban freshwater ecosystems throughout Singapore.

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