Another Oarfish (Regalecus sp.) was found in Bontoc, Southern Leyte yesterday.

Source: Jekie Quirong Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

A 3m long Oarfish (Regalecus sp.) was found in Lugsongan, Limasawa, Southern Leyte yesterday afternoon.

Source: Van Lacerna on Ibarra Blog Site, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines

An Oarfish (Regalecus sp.) stranded in Barangay Talisay, Bontoc, Southern Leyte last 15 February.

Source: Cebu Flash Report Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

There was some initial confusion about where this occurred; these photos were shared on the Cebu Flash Report Facebook page, stating that the Oarfish was found in Talisay. There is a place called Talisay in Cebu, but this is a name that has been given to several different locations in the Philippines. It turns out that “Talisay” here refers to a barangay in Southern Leyte.

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 8 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 7 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 6 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

An afternoon of supposed marine mammal stranding rescue but turned out to be necropsy and burial, a sad afternoon.

Two Spinner Dolphins were seen by a fisherman in Manhilo, Maasin City. One was very weak and the other was accompanying the weak one at around past 11 am of January 20, 2016. The fisherman dragged the weak Spinner to their fish corral and have her rest in the area, the other one was released back to the sea. Report was received by the undersigned at around 12:20 noon and proceeded to the area immediately after changing office uniform and arrived to the site at exactly 12:44 noon.

When we arrived the area, the Spinner was already dead so we decided together with the MCAIFTF or Maasin Bantay Dagat to bring the dead spinner dolphin to the shore.

The basic facts of the Spinner Dolphin, Stenella longirostris, a.k.a. Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin: length 205 cm (from tip of snout to tail), girth 84 cm (near front dorsal fin), span of tail fluke 44 cm, dorsal fin height 13.2 cm, pectoral flipper length 25 cm, weight approximately 45-50 kilos. Other distinguishing marks observed: an oblong hole in the left-side back of dorsal 7 x 4 cm; the tail was obviously tied by a nylon as shown by the wounds; #3 hook was found at the right side of the snout/mouth.

Necropsy findings: cause of death was the accidental biting of hook that led to hunger. The dolphin cannot bite or eat because definitely the hook cause pain in biting. But there was an intriguing observation that the tail was tied by a nylon as shown in the picture. The necropsy was done by the city veterinarian and assisted by MCAIFTF member, Brgy Manhilo Kagawads, BFAR personnel & PENRMO technical staffs.

Gasoline was poured over the dead Spinner Dolphin to avoid people from exhuming the buried Dolphin.

Source: Armando Estrella-Ordiz Basco-Gaviola Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

(This is Part 5 of a 8-part photo set)

This is actually a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).