Daily Decay (29th May 2018)

Daily Decay (29th May 2018): Unidentified Rabbitfish (Siganus sp.) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of yet another fish mass mortality event that was triggered by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor in February and March 2015.

Daily Decay (18th February 2018)

Daily Decay (18th February 2018): Unidentified Rabbitfish (Siganus sp.) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in late February and March 2015, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor.

Daily Decay (11th January 2018)

Daily Decay (11th January 2018): Unidentified Rabbitfish (Siganus sp.) @ Pasir Ris

The remains of numerous fishes were found on the ground below the trees that were occupied by a colony of nesting Grey Herons (Ardea cinerea). It’s likely that these had been dropped by the Herons.

1-3. Fishermen unloading dead fish from the fish farms at Changi Point Ferry Terminal, Feb 12 2014.
4. Dead fish from the fish farms being collected in a waste skip at Changi Point Ferry Terminal, Feb 12 2014.
(Photos by Ernest Chua)

160 tonnes of dead fish found in farms along Johor Straits
By Amanda Lee, 12th February 2014;

About 160 tonnes of fish from fish farms on both the East and West Johor Straits have been found dead, possibly due to low levels of dissolved oxygen in the waters or a plankton bloom or both, as well as the hot weather, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) said yesterday.

The authority has received reports of fish deaths — €which include Groupers (F. Serranidae), Threadfin (Eleutheronema tetradactylum), Golden Trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) and Rabbitfish (Siganus sp.) — ”at 34 fish farms along the East Johor Straits and five fish farms along the West Johor Straits.

TODAY understands that fish supplies to Singapore are unlikely to be affected, as the numbers are relatively low for now. In 2012, fish imports totalled 103,859 tonnes while 5,128 tonnes of fish were produced locally.

Plankton are micro-organisms found in the seawater that can bloom or multiply quickly in a very short time. Plankton blooms can be triggered by fickle weather, higher concentrations of nutrients in sea water and poor water exchange between high and low tides. When their numbers rise quickly, they drain seawater of oxygen and this can result in fish death. The AVA said it has collected samples from the affected farms for analysis and no marine biotoxins were detected.

Clusters of dead fish have been found in various parts of Singapore since last week, including yesterday at the beach at Pasir Ris Park and Raffles Marina. Responding to queries about the dead fish at Raffles Marina, the National Environment Agency said its officers yesterday spotted about 40 dead fishes, most of them mostly Grey Mullet (F. Mugilidae). “€œWater samples taken showed that the water quality parameters are in the normal range,"€ said a spokesperson, noting that the dead fish could have been brought in by the incoming tide.

Source: TODAY (Mirror)

Streaked Rabbitfish (Siganus javus)
Beting Bronok, 12th August 2008