Photo: Apple Amor

“Matt”, the Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) that stranded last October 6 in Santo Domingo, Ilocos Sur was transferred to the BFAR 1 field office in Narvacan, Ilocos Sur using their newly fabricated marine mammal ambulance. Rehab efforts are led by BFAR 1 and PVO of Ilocos Sur.

Source: Friends of PMMSN – Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network

A juvenile male Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) stranded last October 6 in Santo Domingo, Ilocos Sur during the 4th National PMMSN Symposium in Vigan, Ilocos Sur. Some of the participants left the event to attend to the stranding. PMMSN 1, headed by BFAR 1, PAO, and PVO of Ilocos Sur are attending to the animal as of this post.

Source: Leo Jonathan Suarez Facebook, via Friends of PMMSN – Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network Facebook

It appears that earlier articles misidentified the stranded Dolphin as a Rough-toothed Dolphin (Steno bredanensis).

Philippines: Dolphin beached along Ilocos Sur coastline

By Yolanda Sotelo, 6th October 2016;

A Dolphin was found beached along the coastlines of Santo Domingo town in Ilocos Sur on Thursday (Oct.6).

Fishermen found the Rough-toothed Dolphin (Steno bredanensis) at 8 a.m. and carried it toward the delta that leads into the sea.

The Dolphin was very weak but did not bear any visible injuries, said Randy Reburon, fishery coordinator of Sto. Domingo town.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

Based on this post by the Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network, it was actually a Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris).

Philippines: Dolphin beached along Ilocos Sur coastline

The Melon-headed Whale, shown here being treated at a Bureau of Aquatic and Fisheries Resources office facility in Alaminos City, Pangasinan province, died on Thursday.

Philippines: Whale won’t leave coast, dies while being treated
By Yolanda Sotelo, 7th October 2016;

A female Melon-headed Whale (Peponocephala electra) caught two weeks ago in Dasol, Pangasinan province, died on Thursday while undergoing treatment at a facility of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR).

Fishermen found the 2-meter long Whale beached along Dasol Bay on Sept. 23 and brought it back to the sea. But it was sighted again in the afternoon on the same day so village officials decided to bring it to the BFAR facility in Alaminos City.

Samantha Licudine, a BFAR veterinarian, said the Whale had many scratches in the body and had a deep cut near its snout.

“Maybe it was trying to escape from something so there was a laceration,” she said.

The Whale was given intensive medication and was under observation when it died.

“The Whale already had a good appetite and was interacting with BFAR employees, so we had high hopes it would survive,” Licudine said.

Hours after the Whale died, a Rough-toothed Dolphin (Steno bredanensis) was found beached at the coastlines of Sto. Domingo town in Ilocos Sur province. Fishermen carried it toward the delta that leads into the sea.

The Dolphin was very weak but did not bear any visible injuries, said Randy Reburon, fishery coordinator of Sto. Domingo.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

The Dolphin that stranded at Santo Domingo was actually a Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris).

A dead Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) stranded in Barangay Colon, Maasim, Sarangani Province yesterday. The non-fatal wound on the dolphin was caused by a Cookie-cutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis).

Source: Maasim Sarangani Facebook, via Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines Facebook

This Spinner Dolphin was found dead in Maasin, Saranggani by the MENRO of the city. Cause of death is unknown.

Source: Maasim Sarangani Facebook, via Friends of PMMSN – Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network Facebook

A worker carries a Dolphin’s carcass for burial at the fish cemetery inside the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources compound in Dagupan City.
Photo: Willie Lomibao

Philippines: Trapped Dolphin dies, gets buried in Dagupan
By Gabriel Cardinoza, 2016;

A dead Bottlenose Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) was spared from being cut up to pieces and taken to a fish cemetery here instead.

The Dolphin died on Tuesday after it got caught in a fisherman’s net in the Lingayen Gulf.

The Dolphin, a female, was still alive but weak when a fisherman found it trapped in his net around 8:30 p.m., according to Bonuan Gueset village chair Ricardo Mejia.

The Dolphin was carried to shore where it died hours later.

Mejia said he took custody of the Dolphin when he learned that villagers want to butcher it. Butchering endangered animals is against the law.

Mejia said he turned over the dead Dolphin to the National Integrated Fisheries Technology Development Center (NIFTDC) here, where it was buried in the fish cemetery.

Westly Rosario, NIFTDC chief, said the Dolphin had no signs of external injuries. But its snout was bleeding, an indication of internal injuries caused by blast fishing, Rosario said.

Earlier this month, Consuelo Perez, former Board of Investments governor, complained of unabated blast fishing in the Lingayen Gulf, which, she said, could be heard from her house in nearby San Fabian town.

This was the first reported Dolphin beaching here this year.

In January last year, at least 17 injured Bottlenose Fraser’s Dolphins (Lagenodelphis hosei) were found beached in the coastal areas of the Lingayen Gulf from Alaminos City in Pangasinan to Aringay town in La Union.

Rosario said Dolphins come to the Lingayen Gulf to look for flowing water whenever they are ill. He said the West Philippine Sea is a natural marine migration path and Dolphins usually swim by the gulf in search for food.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

If the photo shows the Dolphin involved in this incident, and isn’t that of a different Dolphin, then it’s likely to be a Spinner Dolphin instead of a Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops sp.). Similarly, photos indicate that the mass stranding of Dolphins in 2015 involved Fraser’s Dolphins, not Bottlenose Dolphins.

Philippines: Dolphin interment
29th June 2016;

A Spinner Bottlenose Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) which perished at Tondaligan Beach last Tuesday is carried to the Fish Cemetery at the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources compound on Wednesday for proper burial. The Dolphin was discovered with blood oozing from its mouth and may have been wounded due to blast fishing activities in the area. The practice of burying dead marine creatures was started in 1999 to heighten awareness on the importance of respecting, preserving and protecting marine resources.
Photo: Jojo RiƱoza

Source: Manila Bulletin