Puff-faced Water Snake (Homalopsis buccata)
Jalan Lekar, 27th July 2017

This photograph of a juvenile Puff-faced Water Snake roadkill was shared by Sumita Thiagarajan.

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Photos: Risdawaty Nababan Facebook

Indonesia: Indonesian man comes out on top in life-or-death wrestling match with 7-meter Python
2nd October 2017;

This year, several reptile attacks have made the news in Indonesia, with the scaly beasts claiming human victims during each gruesome incident. However, one man in the Riau province seemingly beat all the odds by not only surviving his encounter with a 7-meter Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) but killing the snake as well.

Robert Nababan, a 37-year-old resident of the Indagiri Hulu regency of Riau, is now resting in a hospital after claiming that he wrestled with the gigantic snake. In his weak physical state, he briefly told reporters the story of his battle with the beast.

According to Robert, he was driving home on his motorcycle from his job as a security guard at a palm oil plantation near his village on Saturday evening. He then came across two pedestrians who wanted to cross the road but stopped in their tracks when they saw the python lying in the middle of the road.

“I tried to catch it (the python). It bit my arm, and we wrestled for a while,” Robert said, as quoted by Detik today.

Unfortunately, before Robert could go on with his story, his family kicked out the journalists who were reporting on the story from the hospital room so that Robert could get some rest.

While we don’t yet have the specifics of the fight between man and snake, the latter’s carcass is being kept as a trophy in Robert’s village, where its long body is tied between two trees for everyone, including children, to see (see photo above).

Considering the size of that snake, it’s incredible that Robert reportedly only suffered deep cuts on his left arm and fingers from the Python’s bite, as well as exhaustion.

In March of this year, a man in West Sulawesi wasn’t as lucky when he encountered a 7-meter Python (rescuers found him dead inside the snake’s stomach, having been swallowed whole). More recently, four people, including a “crocodile shaman”, have fallen victim to reported Crocodile attacks throughout Indonesia.

Source: Coconuts Jakarta

White-spotted Slug Snake (Pareas margaritophorus)
Pasir Ris, 31st May 2017

This White-spotted Slug Snake carcass was found on a park connector, possibly killed after being run over by a cyclist.

Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus)
Old Upper Thomson Road, 4th November 2015

This decomposing young Reticulated Python was found dangling from some vines along Old Upper Thomson Road. It is likely that it had been killed (possibly run over by a vehicle), then placed there by a passer-by.

Equatorial Spitting Cobra (Naja sumatrana)
Bedok Reservoir, 3rd May 2016

This large Equatorial Spitting Cobra was found dead in the drain that runs along the stretch of Tampines Park Connector along Bedok Reservoir Road. The obvious head and spinal injuries suggest that it had been killed by someone, possibly struck repeatedly by a blunt object.

Twin-barred Tree Snake (Chrysopelea pelias)
Upper Peirce, 22nd May 2015

This photograph of a roadkilled Twin-barred Tree Snake was shared by Lena Chow on Facebook.

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  • Fig. 2. View of original position of the snake in the phytotelma upon discovery.
  • Fig. 3. View of snake rearranged to feature head and severed part of the
    body.
  • Fig. 4. View of the dorsum of the snake rearranged within the phytotelma.
  • Fig. 5. View of the dorsum of the snake, with its head at the lowest point.

Photographs by Connor Butler

Carcass of Banded Malayan Coral Snake (Calliophis intestinalis) in a phytotelma

Location, date and time: Singapore Island, Windsor Nature Park, Venus Loop; 20 April 2017; 1000 hrs.

Observation: The anterior two-thirds of a dead Banded Malayan Coral Snake was found partially submerged in the phytotelma (Fig. 2). The posterior section of the snake’s body appeared to have been bluntly removed (Fig. 3). The remaining portion was 25 cm in length (Fig. 4 & 5).

Remarks: The incomplete carcass of the snake suggests that it had been partially eaten. As the Banded Malayan Coral Snake has semi-fossorial habits (see Baker & Lim, 2012: 116), its presence in the elevated phytotelma suggests that it was carried there. Possible predators include raptorial birds such as owls (see Chan, 2013), and
squirrels (see Ogilvie, 1958; Baker, 2017).

References:

  • Baker, N., 2017. Slender Squirrel preying on gecko. Singapore Biodiversity Records. 2017: 54.
  • Baker, N. & K. K. P. Lim, 2012. Wild Animals of Singapore. A Photographic Guide to Mammals, Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes. Updated edition. Draco Publishing and Distribution Pte. Ltd. and Nature Society (Singapore). 180 pp.
  • Chan K. W., 2013. Pink-headed Reed Snake captured by Buffy Fish Owl. Singapore Biodiversity Records. 2013: 89.
  • Ogilvie, C. S., 1958. The Arrow-tailed Flying Squirrel Hylopetes sagitta (Linne). The Malayan Nature Journal. 12 (4): 149-152.

Source: Singapore Biodiversity Records 2017: 71-72