Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger rescued from Wild Boar snare in West Sumatra

27th May 2016;

A Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), which was trapped in a Wild Boar (Sus scrofa vittatus) snare in a hilly forest of Nagari Mandeh Village, West Sumatra, was rescued and evacuated by the local Natural Resource Conservation Agencys (BKSDAs) rescue team.

The team arrived in the area at 11:30 a.m. local time and managed to rescue the Tiger, which had been trapped since Tuesday (May 24), after making the big cat unconscious by shooting a tranquilizer dart, Head of Area III Conservation of West Sumatra BKSDA Surajiya stated here on Friday.

The Tiger would be brought to the Wildlife Cultural Kinantan Park in Bukittinggi District for rehabilitation.

“After undergoing rehabilitation, we will observe the Tiger’s recovery. If possible, we would return the Tiger to its habitat,” Surajiya affirmed.

Meanwhile, Chief of the Nagari Mandeh Village of Koto XI Tarusan Sub-district Jasril Rajo Basah expected the Tiger to be returned to its habitat near the village since the wild cat had not disturbed the day-to-day life of the villagers.

In fact, the village chief and local people acknowledged that the Tiger had several times helped the local people who had lost their way in the forest.

Moreover, the Tiger had become a natural predator of Wild Boars, which ravaged the peoples agricultural areas.

“We live side by side with the Tiger, therefore we hope the big cat will be returned here soon,” Basah added.

Source: Antara

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger rescued from Wild Boar snare in West Sumatra

Indonesia: Death of rare Sumatran Tiger draws ire, scorn

By Apriadi Gunawan, 11th March 2016;

Enviromental activists have condemned the killing and butchering of a Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) by residents of Silantom Tonga village in North Tapanuli regency, North Sumatra.

Activists from the Sumatra Rainforest Institute, Scorpion, the Indonesian Species Conservation Program and the Orangutan Information Center on Thursday flocked to the North Sumatra Police headquarters in Medan to urge the force to thoroughly investigate the mistreatment of the Tiger.

A spokesperson for the groups, Panut Hadisiswoyo, said they had called on the police to take tough action against the police officer reported to have shot the Tiger dead after it wandered into Silantom Tonga.

“This was a barbaric act and a violation of law,” Panut said after meeting officers from the North Sumatra Police’s special crime directorate.

When Tigers wandered into villages, he went on, they should not be killed, but shooed away back into the jungle.

“Ironically, it was a police officer — who should be aware that the Sumatran Tiger is a protected animal — who shot the Tiger,” he said.

Directorate head Adj. Sr. Comr. Robin Simatupang said the force would begin investigation upon reception of complete reports from the North Tapanuli Police.

The 1.5-meter female Tiger weighing 80 kilograms was shot dead by an officer from the Pangaribuan Police on Monday, at the request of local people who had alerted the police after the beast wandered into the village.

The villagers then dismembered and butchered the carcass, distributing the meat to local households to be eaten.

Such practices are locally referred to as binda, a tradition whereby any wild animals encountered are slaughtered and eaten.

Anthropologist and noted Batak cultural figure Bungaran Simanjuntak of Medan State University insisted that eating wild animals, especially protected ones, was not a Batak tradition.

If certain Batak communities ate Tiger meat, he said, it might mean they were related to a certain cult or local tradition.

“For a long time now, we Bataks have shunned eating the meat of Sumatran Tigers,” Bungaran said.

Animals traditionally eaten by the Batak people as part of certain traditions included Buffalo, Swine, Cows and Goats, he said.

Bungaran added that although the killing of the Tiger was intolerable, he did not want to rush to blame the denizens of Silantom Tonga.

“It’s possible that they didn’t realize that the Sumatran Tiger was a protected species,” he suggested.

To prevent similar incidents from reoccurring, he urged authorities to inform villagers of which species were endangered and should not be eaten.

North Sumatra Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) protection section head Joko Iswanto said the agency would summon 50 residents of Silantom Tonga for questioning.

Questioning, Joko said, would be carried out in stages, starting from village leaders to local community figures. “We will announce later whether they are guilty or not,” he said.

“We have noted 50 names allegedly involved in the distribution of the Tiger meat,” he added.

BKSDA data show that the population of Sumatran Tigers in North Sumatra is sharply decreasing as a result of conflict with humans.

In 2014 a Sumatran Tiger was speared to death by people in Toba Samosir regency, while last year, a 5-year-old Tiger almost died after having its leg amputated. The leg was decaying after being caught in a trap set by residents in Batu Madinding subdistrict, Batang Natal district, Mandailing Natal regency.

The Wildlife Conservation Society Indonesia Program (WCSIP) has recorded a decrease in the population of Sumatran Tigers from 150 in the 1990s to 100 as of today; the majority live in and around Mount Leuser National Park, which straddles the border between North Sumatra and Aceh.

Source: Jakarta Post

Indonesia: Death of rare Sumatran Tiger draws ire, scorn

A photo session a moment before cutting the Tiger into pieces. Parts of the Tiger body were distributed among the local community for cooking/meal.
Photo: Emvawari Candra Sirait/Mongabay

Indonesia: A Critically Endangered Sumatran Tiger snared, killed, and eaten, Indonesian NGO Group insists on full investigation
10th March 2016;

A group of Indonesian NGOs on Thursday (10th of March 2016) visited Sumatran Provincial Police in Medan to insist a full investigation of a case of Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) which was snared, killed, and eaten in North Tapanuli, North Sumatra province of Indonesia.

The NGO group comprises Scorpion Foundation, Sumatra Rainforest Institute (SRI), Indonesian Species Conservation Programme (ISCP), and Yayasan Orangutan Sumatra Lestari (YOSL)-OIC. Representatives from these NGO’s met with the Head of Special Crimes Unit at the North Sumatra Provincial Police, Superintendent Robin Simanjuntak.

“We from the environmental NGOs come here to insist full investigation of the Sumatran Tiger which was snared, killed, and eaten in North Tapanuli. Sumatran Tiger is a protected species in the Indonesian law and regulation, and listed as a critically endangered species by the World Conservation Union (IUCN),” Gunung Gea, Director of Scorpion Foundation, told Superintendent Robin Simanjuntak in the meeting. Gunung Gea was appointed by the NGO group members as the speaker of the group in the mission to the North Sumatra Provincial Police.

It is reported by the media that the Tiger was snared by illegal hunters in Silantom village, sub-district Pangaribuan, North Tapanuli Regency in Sumatra. The Tiger was then shot dead by a police officer (Kapolsek Pangaribuan) Mr. VS. The body of the Tiger was cut into pieces and distributed among the local community for cooking/meal.

Superintendent Robin Simanjuntak told the NGOs that he could not make any decision yet on that case before receiving a report from the head of District Police in North Tapanuli Regency. A decision will be taken by the provincial Special Crime Unit after receiving complete information from the head of district police in North Tapanuli.

Source: Scorpion Foundation

Photo: Mongabay-Indonesia

Indonesia: Tiger shot dead, chopped up, eaten

By Apriadi Gunawan, 10th March 2016;

A female Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) has been shot dead after wandering into a village in North Tapanuli regency, North Sumatra, according to the North Sumatra Natural Resource Conservation Agency (BKSDA).

The agency’s protection, preservation and mapping section head, Joko Iswanto, told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday that residents of Silantom Tong village had had the beast shot, then butchered it.

“Only the head remains; we’re keeping it safe at the BKSDA office in Medan,” Joko said.

His office, he added, had not yet ascertained the age of the ill-fated animal, but said that going by the size of its head, it was an adult.

According to reports compiled by Joko, the Tiger was caught in a trap set by villagers.

It managed to free itself, but instead of fleeing back into the jungle, the Tiger instead made its way into the village.

The Tiger reportedly roamed the streets of the village for some time, unnerving residents, who reported the sighting to the police.

R. Simatupang, a resident of Silantom Tong, said that he and his fellow villagers had asked the police to shoot the Tiger; once the Tiger was dead, the villagers dismembered and diced the carcass, distributing the meat to the settlement’s households to be eaten.

Locals refer to such practices as binda.

Binda is a traditional way to treat wild animals — we cut them into pieces and distribute the meat,” Simatupang said.

He would not be surprised, he added, to see further Tigers enter the village, which is located on the edge of the jungle.

“We hope the [local] forestry agency and security officers will determine the whereabouts of Tigers in the forest near Silantom and stop them from disturbing people,” Simatupang said.

Joko, meanwhile, said that the tiger was a victim of growing conflict between humankind and other species, as its habitat had been destroyed by illegal logging.

“Tigers are forced to leave their natural habitats because the forest and surroundings are being damaged by illegal logging,” Joko said.

He added that the conflict between Tigers and humans had claimed numerous lives on both sides.

In 2014, a Sumatran Tiger was speared to death by people in Toba Samosir regency.

Last year, a 5-year-old Tiger almost died after one of its legs was amputated. The leg was decaying after being caught in a trap set by residents of Batu Madinding subdistrict in Mandailing Natal regency.

In terms of human fatalities, Joko said, at least eight people living in the environs of Batang Gadis National Park (TNBG) in North Sumatra had reportedly been killed in Tiger attacks between 2008 and 2014.

The population of Sumatran Tigers in the park is thought to stand at between 10 and 19.

The Switzerland-based International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has listed the Sumatran Tiger as a critically endangered species since 1996.

The organization has reported that the species is struggling with habitat loss amid the expansion of oil palm and acacia plantations, as well as illegal trading, primarily for the domestic market.

Poachers frequently hunt the Tigers, which are native to the vast and diverse habitats of Sumatra, as their body parts fetch high prices for use in traditional medicines in Asia.

Data from the BKSDA show that the population of Sumatran Tigers in the wild currently stands at around 400 across the entirety of the island of Sumatra.

Source: Jakarta Post

Indonesia: Two Sumatran Tigers Rendered Crippled by Trap

27th January 2016;

Two wounded Sumatran Tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) were found in a production forest in Mukomuko regency, Bengkulu, Indonesia. The wounds were suspected to be caused by traps set up by hunters.

The Head of Criminal Unit, AKP Welman Feri, stated to the press that the Chief of Mukomuko Police Department, AKBP Andhika Vishnu, has directly observed the Tigers’ condition through camera trap recordings owned by PT Sifef Biodiversity Indonesia, and it was apparent that Toth tigers are crippled.

Welman added that both crippled Tigers most likely got injured from trying to escape hunter traps, which made them lose their legs. However, the police cannot yet confirm the fact because the recordings are the only evidence. The camera traps were set up by PT Sifef Biodiversity Indonesia who is running a restoration project in the nearby state forest.

In addition, the company workers also claimed to have found lots of traps, which they assume were set up to catch Tigers within production forests and concessions.

“We do not know the total number yet, but it was a lot,” said Welman.

The amount of Tiger traps in the forest proves that Tiger poaching is still taking place in Mukomuko.

The police have arrested two poachers and dealers, also confiscated Tiger skin and organs. Other suspects are still under investigation. Mukomuko Police Department will continue the monitoring to prevent any more poaching around the regency.

Source: ProFauna

Indonesia: Two Sumatran Tigers Rendered Crippled by Trap

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger’s leg amputated after getting trapped

By Apriadi Gunawan, 2nd December 2015;

A 5-year-old Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) lost a leg after getting caught by a trap set by residents in Batu Madinding village, Batang Natal district, Mandailing Natal, North Sumatra.

The Tiger hailing from the Batang Gadis National Park (TNBG) underwent a leg amputation conducted by three veterinarians.

TNBG Center head Bambang Herianto said the team of veterinarians carried out the procedure at the TNBG Center in Mandailing Natal regency on Monday evening.

“Her leg was in poor condition for almost a week. For the sake of her well-being, we decided to amputate her leg with the help of a veterinarian from Australia,” Bambang told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday.

Bambang said the female Tiger’s condition had gradually improved following the surgery. He added that the TNBG Center planned to hand over the Tiger to a conservation institute, such as a zoo, or safari park, after she became stable.

“Releasing the Tiger back to her habitat is impossible because she has lost a leg,” said Bambang.

Bambang said the Tiger was a victim of animal-human conflict as residents living around TNBG had often set traps to protect their village from attacks by wild animals, such as Tigers and Sun Bears (Helarctos malayanus).

“There are around six villages located around TNBG whose residents are often involved in conflicts with wild animals. Residents have become anxious because the wild animals frequently invade their villages,” said Bambang.

He added that the current Sumatran Tiger population in TNBG stood at between 10 and 19 tigers.

According to data from 2006 to 2014, eight people living in villages located around TNBG had been mauled to death by Tigers.

Bambang said the Tigers had trespassed human settlements as their cruising range and habitat had been encroached by humans.

He acknowledged that many of the forest reserves in TNBG had been converted by residents into rubber farms.

TNBG currently spans 72,150 hectares, having declined from three years ago when it spanned 108,000 hectares.

Padang Sidempuan Conservation and Natural Resources Affairs head Subhan said the decreasing area of TNBG had resulted in the depletion of Sumatran Tigers’ food sources, leading them to venture out of their habitat and invade human settlements in search of food.

“Sumatran Tigers often venture out of the TNBG area to seek food in villages because its habitat corridor has been damaged by illegal loggers, thus prompting human-animal conflict,” said Subhan.

Besides conflict with humans, the declining number of Sumatran Tigers is also due to rampant hunting.

A joint team of officers from the North Sumatra Police and a forest rangers’ quick response unit from the Mount Leuser National Park recently cracked a syndicate trading Sumatran Tiger skins, following the arrest of four suspects during a transaction in a hotel in Binjai.

Source: Jakarta Post

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger’s leg amputated after getting trapped

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger’s leg amputated after getting trapped

By Apriadi Gunawan, 2nd December 2015;

A 5-year-old Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) lost a leg after getting caught by a trap set by residents in Batu Madinding village, Batang Natal district, Mandailing Natal, North Sumatra.

The Tiger hailing from the Batang Gadis National Park (TNBG) underwent a leg amputation conducted by three veterinarians.

TNBG Center head Bambang Herianto said the team of veterinarians carried out the procedure at the TNBG Center in Mandailing Natal regency on Monday evening.

“Her leg was in poor condition for almost a week. For the sake of her well-being, we decided to amputate her leg with the help of a veterinarian from Australia,” Bambang told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday.

Bambang said the female Tiger’s condition had gradually improved following the surgery. He added that the TNBG Center planned to hand over the Tiger to a conservation institute, such as a zoo, or safari park, after she became stable.

“Releasing the Tiger back to her habitat is impossible because she has lost a leg,” said Bambang.

Bambang said the Tiger was a victim of animal-human conflict as residents living around TNBG had often set traps to protect their village from attacks by wild animals, such as Tigers and Sun Bears (Helarctos malayanus).

“There are around six villages located around TNBG whose residents are often involved in conflicts with wild animals. Residents have become anxious because the wild animals frequently invade their villages,” said Bambang.

He added that the current Sumatran Tiger population in TNBG stood at between 10 and 19 Tigers.

According to data from 2006 to 2014, eight people living in villages located around TNBG had been mauled to death by Tigers.

Bambang said the Tigers had trespassed human settlements as their cruising range and habitat had been encroached by humans.

He acknowledged that many of the forest reserves in TNBG had been converted by residents into rubber farms.

TNBG currently spans 72,150 hectares, having declined from three years ago when it spanned 108,000 hectares.

Padang Sidempuan Conservation and Natural Resources Affairs head Subhan said the decreasing area of TNBG had resulted in the depletion of Sumatran Tigers’ food sources, leading them to venture out of their habitat and invade human settlements in search of food.

“Sumatran Tigers often venture out of the TNBG area to seek food in villages because its habitat corridor has been damaged by illegal loggers, thus prompting human-animal conflict,” said Subhan.

Besides conflict with humans, the declining number of Sumatran Tigers is also due to rampant hunting.

A joint team of officers from the North Sumatra Police and a forest rangers’ quick response unit from the Mount Leuser National Park recently cracked a syndicate trading Sumatran Tiger skins, following the arrest of four suspects during a transaction in a hotel in Binjai.

Source: Jakarta Post

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger’s leg amputated after getting trapped