Indonesia: Wanted: Tiger Killer on Facebook
30th June 2015;

Only a few days after the case of a (presumed) Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) slaughter in Central Kalimantan, which arose after some photos were uploaded on Facebook by a user named Polo Panitia Hari Kiamat, now the netizens are again bewildered by a killing of a Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). Again, the case became widespread after the photos were uploaded and shared by lots of Facebook users.

Sumatran Tiger is a protected species, and its population has been dwindling due to habitat loss and poaching. Poaching and killing Sumatran Tigers is a crime. According to the Law no.5 of 1990 concerning the Conservation of Living Natural Heritage and Its Ecosystem, anybody who violates this law is liable to 5 years of prison and IDR 100 million fines.

If you happen to recognize or know the men shown on the photos, please inform Protection of Forest & Fauna (PROFAUNA) Indonesia by email to: international@profauna.net, or by sms to 081336657164, 081615711592, or call us at 08563693611

PROFAUNA will forward the infomration to the authority. Help us find these felons, save the remaining Tiger population! Remember that the case of Orangutan slaughter in Borneo could never be solved quickly if not for your participation in spreading the words. Thank you!

Source: ProFauna

Unintended target: West Sumatra Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) officers load a dead Tiger onto a truck for burial in the provincial capital of Padang, Monday. The adult 2 meter-long protected Sumatran Tiger was found dead on Saturday in a trap that local farmers set up for Wild Boars. Antara/BKSDA Sumbar

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger found dead in wire trap
By Syofiardi Bachyul Jb, 5th May 2015;

A Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) has been found dead in a wire trap laid by a farmer in Pelangai Gadang village, Ranah Pesisir district, Pesisir Selatan regency, West Sumatra.

West Sumatra Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) Region II section head Surajiwa said the farmer, named Darwin, 55, reported to the local police that a Tiger had been caught in his trap on May 2. The police then reported it to the BKSDA.

“Our officers inspected the location and found the Tiger already dead. We estimate it was trapped for two days. We have brought its carcass to Padang to be buried this morning,” Surajiwa told The Jakarta Post on Monday.

The female Tiger was estimated to be around 10-years-old. It died of wounds to its head and body. The location of the trap was around 2 kilometers from a village and 10 km from the Kerinci Seblat National Park (TNKS). The farmer had placed the trap for Wild Boars (Sus spp.) that often destroyed his chili and rubber farm.

“Based on information, he unintentionally trapped the animal, but we will send a joint team to the location again to further investigate the cause of death,” said Surajiwa.

The BKSDA has made efforts to secure the location and prevent the same incident from happening because based on a report from residents, an adult male Tiger and a Tiger cub were also roaming in the area. The Tigers have killed people’s livestock on several occasions.

TNKS Tiger protection and conservation field manager Dian Risdianto said although the dead Tiger was found as far as 10 km away, it would likely be from the TNKS.

According to Dian, the Tiger population was dwindling because of Tigers being trapped by poachers and farmers who placed traps. The current Tiger population in TNKS, spanning 1.37 million hectares, is 166.

“This is the latest data from the 2015 survey, by setting up cameras in various locations,” Dian told the Post on Monday.

In 2007, the Sumatran Tiger population across Sumatra was estimated at between 400 and 500.

Dian said the highest risks faced by the Tigers were traps, so TNKS Tiger protection and conservation conducted routine patrols to remove them. Each year, up to 40 active and inactive Tiger traps are found in the TNKS.

In the past five years, she added, three Tigers had been found dead by traps laid by farmers around TNKS, based on data from Pesisir Selatan, while four others were saved after being ensnared.

“We were able to arrest two poachers in Kerinci regency this year and another three in Sarolangun in February. We also seized a complete Tiger pelt and its bones,” said Dian.

She added that the Tigers were also threatened by habitat encroachment due to illegal logging and conversion as well as human-animal conflicts.

“With routine patrols, the Tiger population in TNKS could rise to 10 percent. However, members of the community must help by being careful with their traps and coordinating with the BKSDA and TNKS,” said Dian.

Source: Jakarta Post

Top: Decomposing carcass of an adult Orangutan in the forest of Southwest Aceh.
Bottom: Elephant bones found with a noose near Gunung Leuser National Park. This Elephant’s ivory is missing.
Photos by Leuser Conservation Forum

Indonesia: Poachers target Elephants, Tigers in Sumatran park
By Loren Bell, 31st July 2014;

The Leuser Ecosystem in Aceh, Indonesia is gaining the attention of international animal traffickers, according to the Leuser Conservation Forum (FKL). From the beginning of 2013, FKL patrols have dismantled 282 makeshift traps targeting high value threatened species, and the situation is getting worse.

“This is a crisis for Leuser,” said Dediansyah, Director of FKL, “We have found many wild animal traps in the forest installed by hunters. Their major targets are Sumatran Tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) and Sumatran Elephants (Elephas maximus sumatranus).”

The snares are typically constructed from simple materials of varying size and design depending on the animal. In 2013, FKL patrols dismantled 127 such devices: 43 set for Tigers, 32 for birds, 20 for deer, 19 for Elephants, and 13 for Sumatran Rhinoceroses (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis). In the first six months of 2014, patrols found 160, suggesting an marked increase in hunting activity.

In addition, FKL patrols have found several Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) and Elephant carcasses, which investigators believe were the victims of hunting.

On the south end of Gunung Leuser National Park, FKL investigated four separate Elephant carcasses found with their tusks removed. The team discovered large steel cable snares, pit traps, and poison in the surrounding areas. Near one Elephant, a large number of bent and broken trees indicate that the animal was caught by its leg, and thrashed about trying to escape until it presumably died from exhaustion.

“[The hunters] seem to know where the Elephants migrate,” said Dedi, “and install traps along that route and wait for the Elephant to stumble across them.”

According to Dedi, more hunters are coming from outside the region, working in cooperation with wildlife traffickers. In addition to regular hunting for meat and the pet trade, an increased demand for body parts on the international Chinese medicine market has put pressure on Leuser. Unlike most other forests in Indonesia, Leuser’s wild animal population is still relatively intact and abundant.

In addition to tigers and elephants, other commonly hunted animals include Hornbills (F. Bucerotidae), Deer (F. Cervidae), and Orangutan, while songbirds are regularly trapped for sale in the pet markets.

During the last year, Porcupine (F. Hystricidae) hunting in particular has seen a sharp increase, with the price for a single animal reaching Rp 300,000 ($26). It is believed that bezoar stones (masses of undigested organic and inorganic material) found inside the digestive tracts of some of these animals have medicinal or magical powers. Reportedly, stones sell in the city of Medan in Indonesia for Rp 5-10 million ($430 – $860) apiece.

Currently, FKL has only eight patrol teams working in cooperation with the Forestry Department to monitor only four of the 13 regencies that comprise the 2.6 million hectare Leuser Ecosystem.

Source: Mongabay

(ANTARA FOTO/Helti Marini Sipayung)

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger rescued from trap undergoes leg amputation
By Helti Sipayung, 5th April 2014;

A Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), rescued earlier after becoming entangled in a sling snare trap in Bengkulu Province, had one of its legs amputated on Saturday due to a severe infection.

The medical team at Bengkulu Natural Resource Conservation Agency (BKSDA) had to amputate the tiger’s front right paw to prevent the spread of the infection.

“The tiger may set her paws on the ground again in three weeks,” a veterinarian of BKSDA Erni Suyanti Musabine said.

Elsa, the name of the tiger, will receive treatment for the next three weeks.

The three-year old female tiger was 1.5 meters long and weighed 70 kilograms. It was rescued by the BKSDA in Beriang Tinggi Village, Tanjung Kemuning Sub-district, Kaur District, Bengkulu.

The BKSDA received a report about the trapped tiger on Tuesday, April 2, from an official of the local Forestry Office, who was measuring the perimeter of the commercial permit (HGU) for PT Dinamika Selaras Jaya, a private oil palm plantation company in Beriang Tinggi Village.

The BKSDA team began the rescue operation on Thursday morning, as it was difficult to work at night. The veterinarian said it might be difficult for the tiger to hunt once it is returned to the wilds.

However, research from the agency using camera traps, showed that some tigers, who also have had one of its legs amputated, are able to survive.

Sling snare traps set by poachers or even local residents have become a serious threat to wildlife in Sumatra.

Last year in February, another female Sumatran Tiger was found entangled in a sling snare trap in Bengkulu.

Due to a severe infection, the tiger died two months later. The local BKSDA veterinarian said one of the tiger’s rear legs had a pinched nerve after being entangled in the sling snare trap. It also suffered from liver disease.

Source: Antara

Indonesia: BKSDA Saves Trapped Sumatran Tiger

By Phesi Ester Julikawat, 5th April 2014;

The Natural Resource Conservation Agency (BKSDA) of Bengkulu has saved a Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) that was trapped by residents in Kaur Regency on Thursday.

According to BKSDA veterinarian, Erni Suyanti, the tiger was found in a man-made trap in the palm plantations area belonging to PT Dinamika Selaras Jaya in Trans Sulau Village, Kaur Regency with its right foot decayed.

“Since it was trapped for more than three days, its right foot was rotten and had to be amputated,” said Yanti to Tempo yesterday.

The female tiger weighed 70 kilograms and has been treated with antibiotic injections, pain killers and hydration treatment. It is currently quarantined in the BKSDA’s facility for recovery. BKSDA is awaiting the instruction from the Forestry Ministry regarding the tiger.

“Ideally, it would be released back to the wild, but considering its conditions, we have to wait for the minister’s decision about where it’s going to be transferred,” said the vet.

Source: Tempo

Indonesia: BKSDA Saves Trapped Sumatran Tiger

Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). (ANTARA/Helti Marini Sipayung)

Indonesia: Sumatran Tiger rescued from trap may undergo leg amputation
By Helti Marini Sipayung, 4th April 2014;

A Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) may have one of its legs amputated due to infection after being entangled by a hunter’s sling snare trap in Bengkulu.

Veterinarian of Bengkulus Natural Resource Conservation Agency (BKSDA) Erni Suyanti Musabine said here on Friday the tiger’s front right leg had to be amputated to prevent the spread of bacterial infection.

“It must have been entangled for three days,” she said.

Despite the defective front right leg, the tiger was in good physical condition. It had neat fur and his weight was proper.

The three-year old female tiger was 1.5 meters long and weighed 70 kilograms.

Antibiotics were used to prevent the spread of the bacterial infection to the other parts of the tiger’s body.

The tiger was now kept in the BKSDA office and will receive follow-up treatment on Saturday, April 5.

Previously, the BKSDA received report about the trapped tiger on Tuesday, April 2, from an official of the local Forestry Office, who was measuring the perimeter of the commercial permit (HGU) for PT Dinamika Selaras Jaya, a private oil palm plantation company in Beriang Tinggi Village, Tanjung Kemuning Subdistrict, in the Kaur district of Bengkulu.

The BKSDA team began the rescue operation on Thursday morning as it was difficult to conduct the operation during the night.

The sling snare traps from poachers or even local residents have become a serious threat for wildlife in Sumatra.

Last year in February, another female Sumatran Tiger was found entangled by a sling snare trap in Bengkulu.

Due to severe infection, the ill-fated big cat died two months later. The local BKSDA veterinarian said one of the tiger’s rear legs had a pinched nerve after being entangled on the sling snare trap. It also suffered from liver disease that worsened its condition

Source: Antara